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U.S Allies Give Blunt Reviews Of Trump’s Foreign Trip |The Republican News

 

Gregory Korte
US President Donald Trump (front row C) reacts as he stands by (front row from L) Portuguese Prime Minister Antonio Costa, Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, Hungary's Prime Minister Viktor Orban, Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May, (back row from L Romanian President Klaus Werner Iohannis, Slovakia's President Andrej Kiska and Iceland's Prime Minister Bjarni Benediktsson, during a family picture during the NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) summit at the NATO headquarters, in Brussels, on May 25, 2017.© MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images US President Donald Trump (front row C) reacts as he stands by (front row from L) Portuguese Prime Minister Antonio Costa, Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, Hungary’s Prime Minister Viktor Orban… 

WASHINGTON — President Trump received a largely cordial welcome on the first overseas trip of his presidency. But now that he’s returned to Washington, the foreign leaders he met with are increasingly blunt in their reviews of the American president.

In separate remarks intended mostly for domestic consumption, leaders of Germany, France and Israel all sought to distance themselves from Trump, just days after meeting with the president during his nine-day foreign trip to Saudi Arabia, Israel, Vatican City, Brussels and Italy.

Among the sources of friction: Trump’s reluctance to unreservedly commit to the North Atlantic alliance, his skepticism of a climate change accord signed on to by his predecessor, President Obama, and outreach to Palestinians in pursuit of a Middle East peace agreement.

“It’s clear that in Europe at least, that anti-Trump position plays well domestically,” said Ivo Daalder, a former U.S. ambassador to NATO in the Obama administration. “But the larger issue is that the trip didn’t go well in Europe.”

The dynamic is partly one of Trump’s brash style. “I think what grates on European leaders is the sense that he does not treat them as equals, let alone as allies,” Daalder said. “He approaches them in this confrontational way, in an attempt to constantly get a better deal out of them.”

Trump hasn’t spoken about the trip publicly, avoiding press conferences for the entire journey. But on Twitter, he pronounced the mission a triumph. “Just returned from Europe. Trip was a great success for America. Hard work but big results!” Trump tweeted on Sunday.

The reaction abroad was more cautious:

France: New French President Emmanuel Macron said his now-famous white-knuckled handshake with Trump was a deliberate attempt to demonstrate that he wouldn’t be bullied by the American president. “One must show that you won’t make small concessions, even symbolic ones, but also not over-publicize things, either,” he told the French newspaper Journal du Dimanche“My handshake with him — it wasn’t innocent.”

Germany: Chancellor Angela Merkel said Sunday at a Bavarian beer hall that Europe can no longer “fully rely” on its overseas allies. On climate issues, she said, the Group of Seven meeting was “seven against one” — counting the European Union as part of the seven (and the United States as the one). Her chief political rival took umbrage at the way Trump sought to “humiliate” Merkel in Brussels. “I reject with outrage the way this man takes it upon himself to treat the head of our country’s government,” said Martin Schulz, who is challenging Merkel for the chancellorship as an “anti-Trump” candidate. He said Trump was “acting like an autocratic leader.”

United Kingdom: British Prime Minister Theresa May is upset that American intelligence officials leaked information about the Manchester concert bombing to the media. Trump acknowledged that he got an earful from May, tweeting Sunday that she was “very angry” about the leaks. “Gave me full details!”

Israel: Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who has said Israel has “no better friend” than Trump, appeared to hold the president at arm’s length on Monday. Speaking to members of his conservative Likud party, Netanyahu warned that a Trump-brokered peace negotiation with the Palestinians “comes at a price.” And while he welcomed U.S. support for Israel, he emphasized that “there is no such thing as innocent gifts.”

Palestinian Authority: An Israeli television station reported that Trump shouted at Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, during their meeting in Bethlehem last week yelling, “You tricked me!” and accusing the Palestinian Authority of inciting violence in the West Bank. (The Palestinians denied the report.)

Trump’s trip began in Saudi Arabia with a summit of Muslim Arab leaders — and they’re perhaps the least likely to grumble. After feeling neglected by Obama, the Saudis welcomed a $110 billion arms package and Trump’s more bellicose rhetoric toward mutual enemies like Iran and the Islamic State.

But in Europe, Trump’s “America First” foreign policy appeared to alienate other members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the 68-year-old alliance intended to contain Russia — the country at the center of a growing controversy over ties to Trump aides.

At a ceremony meant to solemnize the collective defense provision of the NATO charter in Brussels, Trump failed to explicitly reassure European allies that the U.S. would come to their aid in the event of an attack. Instead, he renewed his complaints that they were not paying their fair share. (In doing so, he misrepresented the commitment by NATO allies to spend at least 2% of their economies on defense.)

And in Sicily, where leaders of the G-7 economic powers gathered, Trump continued his hard-line stance on climate and trade issues. He reportedly told Merkel that Germany was “bad” or “evil” (depending on the translation) because of its trade imbalance with the United States.

But among Trump supporters, his tough talk to foreign leaders drew raves. Sen. Bob Corker, the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said he “could not be more pleased” with Trump’s international travels.

“The trip was executed to near perfection and it appears the president has made great progress on the broad range of objectives,” he said after speaking with Trump on Sunday. (USA TODAY)

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Chinese Jets Intercept U.S Surveillance Plane: U.S Officials |The Republican News

 

P-3 surveillance plane                   © Joshua Replogle/AP Photo P-3 surveillance plane  

WASHINGTON, May 26 (Reuters) – Two Chinese fighter jets intercepted a U.S. Navy surveillance plane over the South China Sea on Wednesday, with one coming within 200 yards (180 meters) of the American aircraft, U.S. officials told Reuters.

The officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, said initial reports showed that the U.S. P-3 Orion surveillance plane was 150 miles (240 km) southeast of Hong Kong in international airspace when the Chinese aircraft carried out the unsafe intercept. One Chinese aircraft flew in front of the American plane, restricting its ability to maneuver.

The Pentagon confirmed that two Chinese jets had carried out the intercept, saying it was “unsafe and unprofessional.”

“We continue to review the facts of this incident and will convey our concerns through appropriate channels with the Chinese government,” Pentagon spokesman Navy Commander Gary Ross said in a statement.

A U.S. Navy warship sailed within 12 nautical miles (22 km) of an artificial island built up by China in the South China Sea, U.S. officials said on Wednesday, the first such challenge to Beijing in the strategic waterway since U.S. President Donald Trump took office.

China is deeply suspicious of any U.S. military activity around its coastline, especially in the resource-rich South China Sea, parts of which are disputed by China and its smaller neighbors, including the Philippines, Vietnam and Malaysia.

Incidents such as Wednesday’s interception are not uncommon.

Earlier this month, two Chinese SU-30 aircraft intercepted a U.S. aircraft designed to detect radiation while it was flying in international airspace over the East China Sea.  (REUTERS)

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Interracial Marriage Highest It’s Ever Been In The U.S. |The Republican News

 

Janice Williams
Heather Lindsay and her common-law husband Lexene Charles stand in front of the garage door of their Stamford, Connecticut residence on February 22, 2017 that was vandalized with a racial slur on January 14, 2017. Interracial marriage is on the incline in the U.S., according to a Pew Research Center report released on May 18, 2017.© TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images Heather Lindsay and her common-law husband Lexene Charles stand in front of the garage door of their Stamford, Connecticut residence on February 22, 2017 that was vandalized with a racial slur on January 14… 

 

Fifty years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled miscegenation laws–or laws preventing people of different races and ethnicities from getting married–unconstitutional. Decades later, interracial marriage is now the highest its ever been in the United States, up 14 percent compared to what it was in 1967 when the courts ruled in favor of Richard and Mildred Loving, an interracial couple who were thrown in jail in Virginia for violating the state’s rules against multicultural love.

Only 3 percent of couples in the country had intermarried at the time of the ruling, but by 2015, 17 percent of newlyweds in the U.S. had a spouse from a different racial background, according to U.S. Census Bureau data reviewed by the Pew Research Center in a report released Wednesday.  The increase is the highest it’s ever been, with interracial marriages of black people nearly tripling from 5 percent to 18 percent since 1980. White newlyweds with spouses of a different ethnicity have also increased, from 4 percent to 11 percent since 1980.

Interracial marriages aren’t just up for black and white love birds. About three-in-10, or 29 percent, of Asian newlyweds living in the U.S. entered an interracial marriage in 2015, according to the report. Of those marriages, 27 percent included spouses from Hispanic or Latino decent. As for American born Asians, 46 percent married someone from a different race in 2015 while 39 percent of American born Hispanics tied the knot with a person of a different ethnicity in 2015.

Personal views toward interracial relationships and marriage have changed even more dramatically in the U.S. A separate Pew survey recently found 39 percent of adults viewed intermarriage as a “good” thing for society, compared to just 24 percent who advocated for intermarriage in 2010.

Attitudes toward mixed marriages have shifted even more drastically when considering American views on the matter back in 1990, when 63 percent of non-black adults said they would be completely or somewhat opposed to a family member marrying a black person. In 2015, only 14 percent of non-black adults surveyed said they wouldn’t agree with a relative marrying a black person.

Following the Civil War, many states, particularly ones located in the South, still had regulations that made it illegal for a white person to marry anyone other than a white person. Virginia law also prohibited residents from traveling to other states to avoid miscegenation laws, which is exactly what Richard Loving, a white man, and Mildred Loving, a black and Native American woman, did when they exchanged vows in Washington in 1958.

When the couple was found out by the local sheriff of Central Point, Virginia, where they lived, they chose to move to the country’s capital and later had three children. It wasn’t until they returned to Virginia for a visit in 1967 that they were imprisoned for engaging in an interracial marriage.

Their case made it all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which unanimously ruled miscegenation laws violated the Constitution, most evidently the 14th Amendment. And on June 12, 1967, marriage across racial and ethnic lines was deemed federally legal in the U.S.

Some states took longer than others to adapt to the ruling. Alabama was the last state to completely lift bans against interracial marriage in 2000.   (NEWSWEEK)

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North Korea Says Missile It Tested Can Carry Nuclear Warhead

 

By CHOE SANG-HUN
People watch a television showing a graphic of a North Korean missile launch at at railway station in Seoul on Sunday.© Agence France-Presse — Getty Images People watch a television showing a graphic of a North Korean missile launch at at railway station in Seoul on Sunday.  

SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea said on Monday that the missile it launched a day earlier was a new ballistic missile that can carry a large, heavy nuclear warhead, warning that the United States’ military bases in the Pacific were within its range.

North Korea launched what American officials called an intermediate-range ballistic missile on Sunday from the northwestern town of Kusong. The missile, believed to have a longer range than any other North Korean missile tested so far, landed in the sea between the North and Japan, sparking angry comments from President Trump, as well as from President Moon Jae-in of South Korea and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan.

The North’s official Korean Central News Agency said on Monday that the new ground-to-ground missile, Hwasong-12, hit the targeted open water 489 miles away after soaring to an altitude of 1,312 miles. The missile was launched at a deliberately high angle so it would not fall too close to a neighboring country, the news agency said.

The flight data announced by the North roughly matched that released by Japanese and South Korean officials hours after the launch.

David Wright, a director of the Global Security Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists, wrote in a blog post that if the same missile was flown on a standard trajectory, it would have a maximum range of 2,800 miles.

That would qualify the projectile as an intermediate-range ballistic missile, which could fly far enough to target key American military bases in the Pacific, including those in Guam. The North on Monday used the unfamiliar term “medium-long range” to describe the missile.

The missile test was conducted to verify “the tactical and technological specifications of the newly developed ballistic rocket capable of carrying a large-size, heavy nuclear warhead,” the state news agency said, adding that the North’s leader, Kim Jong-un, watched the launch.

“He declared that the D.P.R.K. is a nuclear power worthy of the name whether someone recognizes it or not,” said the agency, using the acronym of the North’s official name, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

If the United States provokes North Korea, Mr. Kim said, it will not escape “the biggest disaster in history” because “its mainland and Pacific operation region are in the D.P.R.K.’s sighting range for strike,” according to the news agency.

“The coward American-style fanfaronade militarily browbeating only weak countries and nations which have no nukes can never work on the D.P.R.K., and is highly ridiculous,” Mr. Kim said, without naming Mr. Trump. “If the U.S. dares opt for a military provocation against the D.P.R.K., we are ready to counter it.”

Although North Korea has vowed to develop the ability to attack the United States with nuclear warheads and has tested missiles that can reach throughout the Korean Peninsula and its vicinity, it has never tested a long-range missile that could fly across the Pacific. Missile experts say North Korea may still be years away from mastering the technologies needed to build a reliable intercontinental ballistic missile, although Mr. Kim warned in his New Year’s Day speech that his country had reached a “final stage” in preparing to conduct its first ICBM test.

The new missile “may represent a substantial advance to developing” an ICBM, said John Schilling, a missile expert, in an analysis posted on 38 North, a United States-based website that specializes in North Korea.

“This missile would allow North Korea to conduct at least some of the testing necessary to develop an operational ICBM, without actually launching ICBMs, particularly if it includes the same rocket engines,” Mr. Schilling said.

Under a series of United Nations Security Council resolutions, the country is banned from developing or testing ballistic missiles.

The North’s launch took place as its biggest supporter, China, was hosting delegations from around the world at its “One Belt One Road” forum in Beijing. It also came only days after Mr. Moon, the South Korean leader, took office with a call for dialogue with the North.

Analysts say North Korea has often raised tensions to test new leaders in Washington or in Seoul or to increase its leverage when its foes propose negotiations.                              (The New York Times)

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Russian Jet ‘Buzzes’ Another US Plane In Black Sea, Second Incident In A Week

 

Lucas Tomlinson

For the second time in a week, a Russian fighter jet flew up close to a U.S. Navy reconnaissance plane in the Black Sea, a U.S. official tells Fox News.

This latest incident occurred about 30 miles from Russia in a northern portion of the Black Sea about 100 miles from Russian-held Crimea.

The two incidents occurred before and after Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov’s visit to Washington and Alaska this week.

The latest incident occurred Friday morning, when another Russian Su-27 jet flew 40 feet from a U.S. Navy P-8 Poseidon recon plane flying in international airspace, according to U.S. officials.

A previous incident on Tuesday involved an armed Russian Su-27 jet flying within 20 feet of the U.S. reconnaissance plane

It is not immediately clear if the Russian fighter jet on Friday was armed or whether the same American and Russian jets were involved in this latest episode.

A U.S. Defense official tells Fox News the jet was armed and the maneuver was provocative; Rich Edson has the details for 'Special Report'© FoxNews.com A U.S. Defense official tells Fox News the jet was armed and the maneuver was provocative; Rich Edson has the details for ‘Special Report’  

The Friday Russian intercept comes a day after Fox News first reported an armed Russian fighter jet with six air-to-air missiles under its wings came “dangerously close” to US Navy recon plane off the coast of Crimea, according to U.S. officials.

Fox News has since learned the Russian missiles were medium-range AA-10 air-to-air missiles, which NATO calls “Alamo.”

The Pentagon has stepped up its reconnaissance flights in the Black Sea since 2014 when Russian annexed Crimea under the guise of a military training exercise. The U.S. Navy has also sent more warships to the region.

In February, Russian jets buzzed a U.S. Navy destroyer in the Black Sea. Last month, that same warship – USS Porter — launched cruise missiles into Syria from the Mediterranean.

The US Army has deployed dozens of battle tanks and hundreds of soldiers to conduct joint training exercises in Romania along the Black Sea since first arriving in a February. More NATO exercises are expected in the region in the coming months.

On Thursday, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis visited Lithuania to reassure anxious Baltic NATO allies on Russia’s doorstep.

In addition to the two incidents in the Black Sea, on Thursday, a Russian Su-24 attack jet flew south from eastern Russia into South Korea’s air defense zone, forcing Seoul to scramble two F-16 fighter jets. More concerning to the Pentagon, the Russian jet flew 70 miles from the USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier in the Sea of Japan.

Also on Thursday, a new shipment of Russian SA-21 surface-to-air missiles arrived in Syria, doubling the number of missiles the Russians have there, less than a week after pushing forward a new ceasefire agreement in Syria along with Iran and NATO-ally Turkey. While the U.S. government had a representative at the Syrian peace talks in Astana, Kazakhstan, the United States was not a party to the agreement.

President Trump’s national security advisor H.R. McMaster told White House reporters Friday the United States would continue to “confront” Russia going forward.

“What the president has made clear is that he will confront Russia’s disruptive behavior, such as the support for the murderous Assad regime in Syria … its enabling of Iran, and it’s very destructive policy and strategy that it’s executing across the Middle East.”

But McMaster also said the Trump administration would explore areas where the two nations could potentially cooperate.

Russia “could best advance its interests from cooperating with the United States and others to resolve those conflicts rather than perpetuate them,” McMaster said.              (FOX NEWS)

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BREAKING: Trump Has Fired FBI Director, Comey – White House (video)

 

FILE: FBI Director James Comey arrives to testify before a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on "Oversight of the Federal Bureau of Investigation" on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., May 3, 2017.© REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque FILE: FBI Director James Comey arrives to testify before a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on “Oversight of the Federal Bureau of Investigation” on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., May 3, 2017.

Breaking news alert:

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump on Tuesday fired FBI Director James Comey in a shock development, saying Comey was no longer able to effectively lead the agency.

“It is essential that we find new leadership for the FBI that restores public trust and confidence in its vital law enforcement mission,” he said in a letter to Comey released by the White House.  REUTERS

 

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For Over A Year, Serial Killing Suspect Went Undiscovered, Arrested

 

PHOENIX (AP) — For more than a year, Phoenix police were stumped by a string of killings in which a shooter stalked victims after dark and gunned them down as they stood outside their homes or sat in their cars. Nine people were killed in all in a case dubbed the Serial Street Shooter.

Police fielded thousands of tips, went door-to-door in a largely Hispanic neighborhood of Phoenix where the shootings happened and analyzed ballistics from a different, unrelated serial shooting case. On Monday, they announced they had arrested a former city bus driver in the killings while providing scant detail about what motivated him or details about how they made a break in the case, other than to credit tips.

Aaron Juan Saucedo, 23, faces 26 felony counts of homicide, aggravated assault and drive-by-shooting for 12 shootings that took place between August 2015 and July 2016, Phoenix Police Chief Jeri Williams said.

The investigation into the serial killings had focused on what authorities said were seven fatal shootings. But police on Monday said they had tied Saucedo to nine killings in all — eight random victims and one man that he knew.

Saucedo was a bus driver for the city of Phoenix through a temp agency for several months in July through August 2015, Phoenix police said. Records show Saucedo was pulled over for allegedly running a red light on Oct. 27, 2015, just a month after the first killing.

On Monday, Williams and Mayor Greg Stanton appeared alongside other top officials, including Maricopa County’s top prosecutor, to announce the break in a case that had appeared largely stalled in recent months as leads and tips dried up.

“This case plagued our community for more than a year … and left behind a trail of victims that included mothers, sons, brothers, sisters and families still mourning the loss of their loved ones,” William said.

Police say they don’t know what motivated Saucedo and that he didn’t have any connection to any of the eight people who were killed. They said they’d be giving out the $75,000 reward offered for tips, but they wouldn’t reveal details about whether the money was going to one person or multiple people.

The case finally broke when Saucedo was arrested last month in connection with the August 2015 fatal shooting of a man, 61-year-old Raul Romero, who had a relationship with Saucedo’s mother. Authorities investigated Saucedo more closely and connected him to the serial killings.

The Associated Press was unable to reach Saucedo’s public defender on Monday.

Police say that after Romero’s killing, Saucedo struck again about four months later in killing 22-year-old Jesse Olivas, who was gunned down on New Year’s Day 2016 while standing in front of a home.

Phoenix Police Chief Jeri L. Williams announces, Monday, May 8, 2017, in Phoenix, the arrest of 23-year-old Aaron Saucedo in connection with the serial street shootings that terrorized the Phoenix area over four months in 2016.© Matt York/ AP Photo Phoenix Police Chief Jeri L. Williams announces, Monday, May 8, 2017, in Phoenix, the arrest of 23-year-old Aaron Saucedo in connection with the serial street shootings that terrorized the Phoenix area over four months in…

The suspect then went on a killing spree from March of last year through July, police said.

In the end, nine people were killed in 12 separate shootings. All of the killings were random except for the first one, Williams said. “We hope that our community will rest a little easier and that our officers will get a little more sleep knowing that the wheels of justice are finally in motion,” she said.

Gisela Castro, the mother of shooting victim Manuel Castro-Garcia, said news of the arrest felt like she was reliving the day she was told her son had been killed. Castro-Garcia, 19, was fatally shot on June 10, 2016.

“For one part I’m happy because there’s going to be justice in my son’s death and others’ deaths and that person is not gonna do more damage. But my son is not coming back,” Castro said. “I waited every day for justice, but things don’t change. The pain is the same.”

Castro said her son was a noble person who studied and worked hard and was loved by everyone he knew. She said he was never a trouble-maker and preferred playing basketball with friends over partying.

“The only thing I can say is thank God there’s going to be justice and we leave it in God’s hands. May God bless (Saucedo), and I’m not anybody to wish bad upon him,” she said.

Marina Smith, the partner of 21-year-old Diego Verdugo-Sanchez, who was gunned down on April 1, 2016, said she welcomed news of the arrest but was still struggling with his loss.

Smith was seven months pregnant with the couple’s child when Verdugo-Sanchez was fatally shot in front of a home.

Smith said she had grown frustrated over the past year as detectives kept her in the dark about the investigation. “The fact of them finding somebody, at least it was some type of news,” she said.

Police say Saucedo shot at two teenage boys on March 17, 2016, striking one of them in the arm. The suspect struck again the next day but didn’t kill anyone.

The next shooting didn’t happen until April 1, 2016, when Verdugo-Sanchez was fatally shot.

Police also have linked Saucedo to the April 19, 2016, death of 60-year-old Krystal White; the June 3, 2016, death of Horacio de Jesus Pena; and to the killings of two women, Angela Linner and Stefanie Ellis, and 12-year-old girl Maleah Ellis on June 12, 2016. He killed Manny Castro Garcia on June 10, 2016, police said.

In the most recent attack on July 11, 2016, a 21-year-old man and his 4-year-old nephew escaped injury after the gunman shot at a vehicle they were sitting in.     (AP)

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