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Trump To Move US Embassy In Tel Aviv To Jerusalem |The Republican News

donald-trump1

The official Palestinian news agency says President Donald Trump informed Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas of his plans to move the U.S. Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to contested Jerusalem.

The WAFA agency says Trump informed Abbas of his decision in a phone call Tuesday.

Abbas spokesman Nabil Abu Rdeneh says Abbas warned Trump of the dangers of such a decision to Mideast peace efforts as well as security and stability in the region and the world.

The statement did not say if Trump told Abbas when he plans to move the embassy.

The Palestinians seek east Jerusalem as the capital of a future state, and have warned they would halt contacts with Washington if Trump makes unilateral decisions about the status of the city.

Jerusalem, home to key Muslim, Christian and Jewish shrines, is the combustible centerpiece of the Arab-Israeli conflict.

(Source: AP)

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2019 Presidency: We’ve Not Endorsed Any Candidate – U.S. |The Republican News

John-Sullivan1

United States Deputy Secretary of State, Mr John Sullivan

From Aidoghie Paulinus, Abuja

Ahead of general elections in Nigeria, the United States of America declared it has not endorsed any candidate for the presidency in 2019.

US Deputy Secretary of State, John Sullivan, disclosed this in his comments during the closing ceremony of the US-Nigeria Bi-national Commission in Abuja.

He said this in response to a question on the level of involvement of President Donald Trump’s administration in the 2019 elections in Nigeria.

Sullivan said any statement by the United States, with regards to the 2019 elections, would be in support of the Nigerian people and democracy in the country.

“What we want to do, is to ensure to the extent that we can assist, free and fair elections and we won’t pick those candidates.

“We won’t pick any candidate, we won’t endorse any candidate, we want to support the Nigerian people and democracy in Nigeria,” Sullivan said.

He had earlier said the support of the US to Nigeria is usually for the people and not in support of any particular candidate.

“Any statement by the United States, in the events of the 2019 elections, would be in support of the Nigerian people and democracy in Nigeria and not in support of any particular candidate.

“We want free and fair elections, we are not picking candidates, the Nigerian people should pick their candidates and choose among them and make the final choice for themselves,” Sullivan added.   (The Sun)

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A Black Student Wrote Those Racist Messages That Shook The Air Force Academy, School says

Samantha Schmidt
In late September, five black cadet candidates found racial slurs scrawled on message boards on their doors at the U.S. Air Force Academy Preparatory School. One candidate found the words “go home n‑‑‑‑‑‑” written outside his room, his mother posted on social media, according to the Air Force Times.

The racist messages roiled the academy in Colorado Springs and prompted the school to launch an investigation. They led its superintendent to deliver a stern speech that decried the “horrible language” and drew national attention for its eloquence.

Surrounded by 1,500 members of the school’s staff, Lt. Gen. Jay Silveria told cadets to take out their phones and videotape the speech, “so you can use it . . . so that we all have the moral courage together.”

“If you can’t treat someone with dignity and respect,” Silveria said, “then get out.”

The speech, which the academy posted on YouTube, went viral. It was watched nearly 1.2 million times, grabbed headlines nationwide, and was commended by former vice president Joe Biden and Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.).

But on Tuesday, the school made a jolting announcement. The person responsible for the racist messages, the academy said, was, in fact, one of the cadet candidates who reported being targeted by them.

“The individual admitted responsibility and this was validated by the investigation,” academy spokesman Lt. Col. Allen Herritage said in a statement to the Associated Press, adding: “Racism has no place at the academy, in any shape or form.”

Lt. Gen. Jay Silveria, superintendent of the U.S. Air Force Academy.© Mike Kaplan/U.S. Air Force/Handout/Reuters Lt. Gen. Jay Silveria, superintendent of the U.S. Air Force Academy.

The cadet candidate accused of crafting the messages was not identified, but the Colorado Springs Gazette reported that the individual is no longer enrolled at the school. Sources also told the Gazette the cadet candidate “committed the act in a bizarre bid to get out of trouble he faced at the school for other misconduct,” the newspaper reported.

The announcement thrust the Air Force Academy Preparatory School onto a growing list of recent “hate crime hoaxes” — instances in which acts of racism or anti-Semitism were later found to be committed by someone in the targeted minority group.

On Monday, police in Riley County, Kansas, revealed that a 21-year-old black man, Dauntarius Williams, admitted to defacing his car with racist graffiti as a “Halloween prank that got out of hand.” Scrawled in washable paint were racist messages telling blacks to “Go Home,” “Date your own kind,” and “Die.” The incident provoked controversy and concern at nearby Kansas State University, especially after Williams spoke with the Kansas City Star, claiming to be a black student who was leaving the school because of the incident. He was not, in fact, a student.

Officials decided not to file criminal charges against Williams for filing a false report, saying it “would not be in the best interests” of citizens of the Manhattan, Kan., community, police said in a news release. They said Williams was “genuinely remorseful” for his actions and published an apology on his behalf.

“The whole situation got out of hand when it shouldn’t have even started,” Williams said in the statement. “I wish I could go back to that night but I can’t. I just want to apologize from the bottom of my heart for the pain and news I have brought you all.”

When reports circulated last week about the racial slurs on the car, African American students at the nearby Kansas State University campus held a meeting to talk about the incident.

Andrew Hammond, a journalism student at Kansas State, told the Kansas City Star Monday he was “outraged and hurt” to learn the crime was fake.

“As a black student who has witnessed racist incidents first-hand around Manhattan this hurts the credibility of students who actually want to step out and say something about it,” Hammond said. “I’m not sure what type of human being does this kind of thing as a prank.”

About three weeks earlier, police announced that a 29-year-old black man, a former student named Eddie Curlin, had been charged in connection with three racist graffiti incidents at Eastern Michigan University: “KKK” sprayed on a dorm wall, messages ordering blacks to leave scrawled on a building, and a racist message left in a men’s restroom stall.

It’s unclear exactly what prompts people to commit these hoaxes, stunts and false reports. But such revelations have become a major concern for civil rights activists who document racist and anti-Semitic incidents, particularly amid a rise in reported hate crimes since the 2016 general election.

“There aren’t many people claiming fake hate crimes, but when they do, they make massive headlines,” Ryan Lenz, senior investigative writer for the Southern Poverty Law Center Intelligence Project, told ProPublica. All it takes is one false report, Lenz said, “to undermine the legitimacy of other hate crimes.”

These reports have also energized many right-wing commentators and President Trump supporters, who argue that reports about hate speech and racist graffiti are often fake accounts disseminated by liberal media.

“Anyone (including the lapdog media) who was surprised by this hate crime hoax hasn’t been paying attention,” Jeremy Carl, a research fellow at the right-leaning Hoover Institution at Stanford University, tweeted early Wednesday in response to the news about the Air Force Academy Preparatory School. “The stream of fake hate crimes became a flood after Trump’s election.”

“HATE HOAX: Air Force Academy Cadet Candidate Wrote Fake Racist Messages Himself,” read a headline in the conservative Daily Caller.

There is even a website — fakehatecrimes.org — committed to listing hate crime hoaxes.

In August, Sebastian Gorka, then-deputy assistant to Trump and his spokesman on national security matters, appeared on MSNBC to explain why the president hadn’t condemned the bombing of a mosque in Bloomington, Minn. He suggested it was because the attack may have been a “fake” hate crime.

“There’s a great rule: All initial reports are false,″ Gorka said. “We’ve had a series of crimes committed, alleged hate crimes, by right-wing individuals in the last six months, that turned out to actually have been propagated by the left.”

Despite the string of frauds, experts on hate crimes say that false accounts are still relatively rare.

Brian Levin, director for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University at San Bernardino, told Talking Points Memo that hoaxes do appear in hate crime reports, just as they do in reports of other criminal offenses. But these fakes are a “tiny fraction” of the hundreds of hate crimes reported to law enforcement every year.

“These hoaxes have become symbols for some who want to promote the idea that most hate crimes are hoaxes,” Levin said. “That’s important to rectify.”

And indeed, scores of these incidents are cropping up across the country, particularly on college campuses.

Using a ProPublica database, BuzzFeed News found 154 total incidents of hate speech at more than 120 college campuses nationwide. More than two-thirds promoted white supremacist groups or ideology, while more than a third cited Trump’s name or slogans, BuzzFeed News reported.

Yet authorities caught fewer than 5 percent of perpetrators in cases of vandalism or threats. In at least three instances, college officials determined the incident was a hoax, according to BuzzFeed News.

On Tuesday, Silveria, the Air Force general who gained national fame for his speech condemning the September incidents at the preparatory academy, stood by his original remarks.

“Regardless of the circumstances under which those words were written, they were written, and that deserved to be addressed,” Silveria told the Colorado Springs Gazette in a Tuesday email. “You can never over-emphasize the need for a culture of dignity and respect — and those who don’t understand those concepts, aren’t welcome here.”         (The Washington Post)

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Despite Tough Talk, Trump Follows Obama Footsteps On Terror Suspects |RN

By SADIE GURMAN
In this Nov. 1, 2017 photo, President Donald Trump speaks during a cabinet meeting at the White House in Washington. Trump on Thursday backed away from his threat to send the suspect in the New York bike path attack to Guantanamo Bay, acknowledging in an early morning tweet that the military judicial process at the Cuban detention center takes longer than the civilian federal court system. But Trump called again for the man to be executed. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)© The Associated Press In this Nov. 1, 2017 photo, President Donald Trump speaks during a cabinet meeting at the White House in Washington. Trump on Thursday backed away from his threat to send the…

 

WASHINGTON — Donald Trump promised he would fill the military prison at Guantanamo Bay with “bad dudes” and slammed the Obama administration for prosecuting terrorists in U.S. courts. But so far, Trump has treated terror suspects just as President Barack Obama did, passing on Guantanamo in favor of having his own Justice Department lawyers try them in federal court.

The strongest sign yet that he is retreating from his earlier promise came Thursday, when Trump conceded that the civilian courts offer a swifter way to bring terror suspects to justice in the communities they attacked.

A day after he assailed the U.S. criminal justice system as a “joke” and a “laughingstock,” Trump backed off his threat to send the suspect in Tuesday’s New York bike path rampage to the troubled military commission system at Guantanamo.

“Statistically that process takes much longer than going through the Federal system,” Trump said in an early morning tweet, adding that there is “also something appropriate” about keeping him “in the home of the horrible crime he committed.”

It was legally questionable whether the Trump administration could have sent 29-year-old Sayfullo Saipov to Guantanamo, in part because the courts have not ruled whether the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force — which permits the government to detain enemy combatants for the duration of a military conflict — applies to the Islamic State and its followers. And no one held within the U.S. has been sent to Guantanamo since the detention center opened in January 2002 to hold suspected members of al-Qaida and the Taliban.

Trump has passed on other chances to send suspects there, including earlier this week, when the Justice Department said a militant captured in Libya and accused of playing an instrumental role in the 2012 Benghazi attacks would be prosecuted in federal court in Washington, where a trial for the alleged mastermind is already under way.

On Wednesday, the U.S. announced that a man arrested in Bosnia had been brought to New York to face charges that he abandoned the United States in 2013 to join the Islamic State group. And the administration this summer sent an al-Qaida suspect linked to a plot to kill a Swedish cartoonist from Spain to Philadelphia to face terrorism charges in federal court, another break from Trump’s tough-on-terror talk.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who has long argued that terror suspects should be prosecuted at the military prison, expressed confidence Thursday that the U.S. justice system can handle terror suspects like Saipov, an immigrant from Uzbekistan who authorities say was inspired by the Islamic State.

Sessions said the administration would “use all lawful tools at our disposal” in the fight against terror, leaving open the possibility of sending suspects to Guantanamo, but touting for the first time the hundreds of terrorism-related convictions the Justice Department has secured since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

Trump’s early record is a far cry from the rhetoric of his fellow Republicans who for years demanded terror suspects be held as enemy combatants.

Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said Thursday he was “dumbfounded as to why the Trump administration still follows the Obama playbook when it comes to dealing with terror suspects.” Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona made a similar call for Saipov to be interrogated as an enemy combatant, without some of the protections afforded under the American legal system.

Trump’s argument that Saipov should be tried in the same place where he committed his attack closely resembles the one Obama and former Attorney General Eric Holder made in trying to move the five men accused in the Sept. 11 attacks from Guantanamo to New York for trial in a civilian court. That effort that was derailed by political opposition. The men remain at Guantanamo and have yet to be tried. Their cases are likely years from resolution.

Holder expressed vindication after Trump changed course Thursday, writing on Twitter: “Those who criticized my decision to try 9/11 plotters in federal system take note. I was right. 16 years-no justice. Use courts-not Gitmo.”

Just seven men have been convicted at Guantanamo either by trial before military commission or through plea bargains, including four whose convictions were later overturned on appeal or invalidated.

Mary McCord, who oversaw the Justice Department’s National Security Division before her departure in April, said she hoped Trump and Sessions were beginning to recognize the long and successful track record of federal terrorism prosecutors.

“It’s a good sign that the president and the attorney general are listening to the advice of counterterrorism prosecutors, career professionals who have a lot to offer” when it comes making decisions about where to try such suspects.

But the Justice Department said only that such decisions are made on a case-by-case basis and wouldn’t say whether the recent cases are a sign of any formal policy. It remains to be seen how the administration will handle a U.S. citizen picked up on the Syrian battlefield in September for allegedly fighting with Islamic State militants.

In at least a physical sense, there are no practical reasons why the U.S. couldn’t hold someone at Guantanamo. The detention center, which reached a maximum population of about 680 in the summer of 2003, is now down to just 41.    (Associated Press)

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Hitler Survived WWII And Lived In Colombia In 1954 – CIA |The Republican News

Robert Valencia
Copies of Adolf Hitler's book "Mein Kampf" (My Struggle) are pictured at the media preview of "Hilter und die Deutsche Volksgemeinschaft und Verbrechen" (Hitler and the German Nation and Crime) at the Deutsche Historisches Museum (German Historical Museum) in Berlin October 13, 2010.© REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch Copies of Adolf Hitler’s book “Mein Kampf”  

A newly declassified document from the CIA claims that Adolf Hitler apparently survived World War II and lived in Colombia for several months in 1954.

The intelligence memo, part of the just-released files related to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, provides details from an informant, who told CIA agent codenamed Cimelody-3 that Hitler was alive. The informant, who also happened to be the agent’s friend, added that Phillip Citroen, a former German SS agent, appeared to be in touch with the former Führer in the city of Tunja in Colombia’s Boyacá department.

According to the memo, Citroen said that the Germans residing in Tunja followed Hitler “with an idolatry of the Nazi past, addressing him as ‘der Führer’ and affording him the Nazi salute and storm-trooper adulation.” The memo also shows a picture of “Adolf Schrittelmayor,” signaling that Hitler could have changed his last name.

The picture above shows Citroen sitting next to the alleged Hitler, who committed suicide in a Berlin bunker on April 30, 1945, according to the Allies and virtually every historian. But the CIA document ignites a discussion on whether Hitler managed to escape to South America after the war.

“Citroen also stated Hitler left Colombia for Argentina around January, 1955,” the memo says.

The CIA memos make it clear that the agency was skeptical of the reports, but had to take them seriously. “Neither Chimelody-3 nor this station is in a position to give an intelligent evaluation of the information and it is being forwarded as of possible interest,” reads another page of the memo, dated October 3, 1955.

Argentine writer Abel Basti, author of “Tras Los Pasos de Hitler (After Hitler’s steps),”  reconstructed Hitler’s alleged trip across South America, including a months-long stay in Colombia. But the book has been rejected by historians because it lacked evidence, according to Colombia Reports.

Hitler meeting iwth Hungarian Prime Minister Döme Sztójay to discuss strategy, at the Klessheim Palace in Salzburg, Germany, 7 June 1944© ullstein bild/ullstein bild via Getty Images Hitler meeting iwth Hungarian Prime Minister Döme Sztójay to discuss strategy, at the Klessheim Palace in Salzburg, Germany, 7 June 1944

Hitler’s fate has been subject to widespread speculation. According to a report by CNN in 2009, Soviet KGB agents burned Hitler’s remains in 1970 and threw them into a river in Germany based on orders by then-chief Yuri Andropov. According to the report, the bodies of Hitler, his companion Eva Braun and the Goebbels family were discovered by the Soviet Army in May 1945.

But such account sparked more doubts. Nick Bellantoni of the University of Connecticut in 2009 analyzed a piece of a skull that Russia claimed it belonged to Hitler, but the scientist confirmed that it rather came from a 20 to-40-year-old woman.

Historians widely believe that Hitler committed suicide by gunshot and cyanide poisoning as the Soviet Army rushed into Berlin in the waning days of the war.

Slide 1 of 17: Adolf Hitler (1889 - 1945) in Munich in the spring of 1932. (Photo by Heinrich Hoffmann/Archive Photos/Getty Images)

(Newsweek)

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Trump May Not Seek Re-election, Say White House Insiders |The Republican News

Nicole Goodkind
Senator Rand Paul says he isn't sure that Donald Trump will run for a second term.: RTS1G88B                            © Reuters RTS1G88B

Another top GOP official has raised doubts about whether President Donald Trump will run for re-election.

Senator Rand Paul said Sunday night that even though the president is raising millions for a 2020 campaign, Republicans should not assume he’s running.

“There could well be a primary,” the junior senator from Kentucky said on MSNBC, after being asked if a 2020 primary would be good for the Republican Party.

Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) speaks to reporters as he arrives for a vote on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., October 18, 2017.© REUTERS/Joshua Roberts Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) speaks to reporters as he arrives for a vote on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., October 18, 2017.

Paul had prefaced his remark by saying Republicans “need to know [if] President Trump [is] running for re-election. I think you won’t know that until you get into sort of second, third year of his presidency.”

Paul’s comment echoes what Trump insider and New Jersey Governor Chris Christie told the Today show’s Matt Lauer on October 27: “If he runs again I would support him, yes, but I’m not so sure what will happen.”

Christie added, “Four years is a long time, and especially for someone who has not spent a lifetime in politics, so I think those years affect him differently. So I’m sure the president will make whatever decision is best for him and his family and the country.”

Trump, who hates losing, may be exploring his options for a graceful exit that can be framed as a win.

Paul’s and Christie’s comments came after special counsel Robert Mueller filed his first indictments in his investigation into Russian attempts to interfere in the 2016 election. Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort and Rick Gates, his longtime business partner, have been named in a multiple-count indictment citing money laundering and other illegalities. The indictment was unsealed Monday morning, and the charges don’t look good for a president who campaigned on “draining the swamp.”

Ohio Governor John Kasich is already running a primary campaign against Trump, according to a new report. Vice President Mike Pence and Senators Tom Cotton and Ben Sasse are also running shadow primary campaigns, an August New York Times piece claimed.

Opting not to run for a second term would be an unorthodox move, much like the rest of Trump’s unprecedented presidency.

Only three other presidents have purposefully stepped away from the White House after one term. James Polk ran in 1844 on the promise that he’d serve for just four years and did just that. In 1927, Calvin Coolidge, known for being rather terse, handed reporters a slip of paper that simply said, “I do not choose to run for President in 1928.” In 1968, amid growing protests over the Vietnam War, Lyndon Johnson announced he would not seek re-election.     (Newsweek)

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Lucky Student Becomes Model After Homecoming Photos Go Viral |RN

Rachel Hosie
a group of people standing in front of a crowd© Provided by Independent Print LimitedA 19-year-old student his set to become a model after pictures of her went viral.
 

Anok Yai is a sophomore at Plymouth State University in New Hampshire and she was snapped by a photographer at Howard University’s homecoming celebrations in Washington, DC last weekend.

But after the photos were posted by the photographer on his Instagram account, TheSUNK, Yai went viral.

Not only were the images widely shared and commented upon, but they’ve even led to Yai being contacted by multiple model agencies who want to sign her.

“Saw her right at the end of Yardfest,” wrote the photographer. “Stunning @anokyai.”

He was looking for the best dressed students at the event and Yai caught his eye. She thought perhaps she could gain a few more followers so struck a pose and moved on.

But the reaction to the pictures was greater than Yai could’ve imagined.

The artist shared two photos of Yai, which have now racked up over 11,000 likes and hundreds of comments on Instagram.

Speaking to the Boston Globe about when she realised her photos were going viral, Yai said: “My phone just started vibrating rapidly for a long, long time.

“At first, I honestly thought someone made a meme of me or something.”

She said she didn’t really understand what all the fuss was about, admitting that she thought it was “an average photo.” “At first, I questioned what everyone was seeing because I didn’t really see it,” she said. “Honestly, I think that people get so used to seeing themselves that people don’t see their own beauty because they see it everyday.”

But as her followers grew and the comments poured in, many members of the public urged modelling agencies to sign Yai.

And by Tuesday evening she’d been contacted by three agencies.

Yai says she’s always been interested in fashion and art but never thought she could actually be a model.

But now Yai would like to pursue modeling alongside her biochemistry degree.

“It was a dream that I always wanted, but I wasn’t sure if it was going to happen,” she said.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BahqMEDh22W/embed/captioned/?cr=1&v=7&wp=1051#%7B%22ci%22%3A0%2C%22os%22%3A3929.2109155000912%7D

a group of people standing in front of a crowd
(The Independent)
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