Image

The ‘Fulanisation’ Of Nigeria And The Perfidy Of The British (Part 2) – Femi Fani-Kayode

Femi-Fani-Kayode

Perhaps the most insightful and concise contribution that I have read about the history of the Fulani and their inordinate ambition and insatiable thirst for domination and conquest was provided by Mr Gbonkas Ebiri.

His research and analysis of this topic are as historically accurate as it is outstanding. Permit me to share his words.

“Kingdoms that accommodated Fulani herdsmen in the past were eventually overthrown by the Fulani. In all situations, these herdsmen took up arms and fought for a Fulani leader to overthrow the kingdoms that accommodated them and their cattle. Examples in history:

The first Fulani Jihad was at Futa Jallon. Fulani pastoralists migrated here in large numbers from North Africa in the 1600’s (they migrated in smaller factions earlier).

Futa Jallon was a mountainous rich agricultural land. Shortly after the Pastoralist migrations, Fulani clerics migrated as well. they were called Ulamas.

In 1726, the Fulani community elected one of their own by the name Ibrahim Musa as their leader and gave him the title of Al-Imam (Leader of the Muslim community). Shortly after his election he proclaimed a jihad against the local rulers of the region and enlisted the herdsmen as soldiers in his Jihad.

His successor after his death and new Al- Iman, Ibrahim Sori completed the Jihad in 1776. The new Fulani aristocracy drove out many of the natives. Those they did not drive out, they enslaved.

Slave trade thrived in the region after the Jihad, this was when the slave castle at Goree Island (Point of no return) was built. They captured mostly the people of the Mandinka tribe (this was the tribe of Kunta Kinte).

Another region not far from Futa Jallon was Futa Toro. It was rich in Agriculture and the stretch of the Senegal river passed through it. By the banks of this river was fertile farmlands.

This region was of great importance to the Fulani pastoralists who migrated to the region around the same time they migrated to Futa Jallon. They could have the cattle feed and drink by the banks of the river. Shortly after the herdsmen arrived, clerics migrated as well.

They formed the majority of the Torobde clerics. A Fulani cleric called Sulayman Bal was nominated by the clerics as the spiritual leader. In the year 1776, Sulayman Bal launched a Jihad against the Denyanke dynasty and enlisted herdsmen into his army of the faithful.

They were overthrown and replaced with a new aristocracy of Fulani leaders. He died while trying to expand the empire to the regions of Trarzas. His successor, Abd al- Qadir completed the expansion and expanded the empire Southeast.

In our own Nigeria, the Fulani migrated as herdsmen and lived in communities. As at the time Dan Fodio arrived, they had Fulani leaders in almost all the Hausa City states with a large concentration in Katsina and Kano.

These leaders included Moyijo at Kebbi, Mohammadu Namoda at Zamfara, Salihu and Mohamadu Dabo of Kano. Very much like the previous Jihads, Dan Fodio was recognized as the leading cleric and given the title of ‘Sarkin Musulmi.’ (Leader of the Faithful).

He formed a community after his confrontation with the authorities at Gobir and called on the faithful to join him, from the community he launched his Jihad.

Majority of his soldiers were herdsmen and another faction natives that fell for his charismatic leadership. Dan Fodio would eventually give flags of leadership to the Fulani leaders of the various Hausa cities.

By far, the Dan Fodio’s Jihad was the most successful and all Fulani Jihads in West Africa. He would also replace the Hausa kings with Fulani aristocrats, and like the previous Fulbe leaders, the new empire was hostile to the natives.

Their lands were taken from them and they were relegated to second-class citizens in their ancestral homeland. Many of them were forced into slavery under an oppressive feudal system and others sold to Arab slave traders.

At Ilorin, the shortsighted rebel Afonja made it so easy for the Fulani to get rid of him. Unlike the other kingdoms where they migrated on their free will and chose their spiritual leader, Afonja personally wooed the Fulani to his kingdom and appointed Alimi as the cleric of the province.

Both vital foundations for a Fulani takeover were given on a platter of gold by the warlord. Very much as in all cases, the Fulani got rid of him and ensured the throne of Ilorin for their kinsman.

So far they have not been able to invade beyond Ilorin. The warriors at Ibadan fought them back as well as Benin warriors. To conquer the south, it is important to have Fulani herdsmen and clerics stationed in the land.

It is important to indoctrinate natives who profess same religion with them to trade their ancestry for a religious theocracy of a divine cleric.

Among the Yoruba people, they will succeed as they did in the old Ilorin emirates when many natives of old Oyo empire enlisted in the army of Alimi’s descendants to invade villages under Oyo and capture their fellow kinsmen as slaves to be sold to the Portuguese.

All observations of history prove beyond doubt that giving colonies and settlements to Fulani people under the guise of land for grazing is very dangerous.

The Fulani is obsessed to conquer the South and take it from the ancestral owners like they did to the Hausas. The South owns the Ports and oil. It owns the best companies and rainforests. That is what they secretly want and not grazing land for cows.

With scattered Fulani settlements in the south, they will bring their clerics and launch a new phase of Jihads from our base…. Cattle colonies is a plan to conquer the South.

Herdsmen are foot soldiers of the Fulani empire and the demand for lands in the South is the first step in future to take over the ancestral lands of the Southern people”. (CONCLUDED).

I commend Mr Ebiri for his courageous submission and I wholeheartedly concur with his conclusions and findings. He has said it all and there is very little left to say.

It is left for the Nigerian people to either resist the attempt to ‘Fulanise’ their entire nation by learning from the lessons of history, increasing their depth of knowledge, creating awareness about the formidable challenges with which they are faced and rise to the occasion or they can sit back, act as if there is no danger or threat and be indoctrinated, stripped of all they have and all they are, conquered, dehumanised, enslaved and overwhelmed. The choice is ours.

And if anyone still doubts the assertion that we are in mortal danger I would urge them to read the words of Professor Ango Abdullahi, the spokesman of the Northern Elders Forum and a leading member of the Fulani cabal, in a recent interview with the Sunday Vanguard Newspaper where he told us “why herdsmen must kill”, where he sought to defend, justify and rationalise the bestial and barbaric acts of mass murder, genocide and ethnic cleansing that the Fulani herdsmen and terrorists have unleashed on the people of the south and the Middle Belt and where he claimed that the British had “granted” what he described as “grazing routes” in the Middle Belt and the south to the Fulani terrorists and herdsmen as far back as 1914!

Never in the history of our country, other than during the civil war, has a mass murder, genocide, ethnic cleansing, the slaughter of infants and babies, rape, destruction and the burning and pillaging and violent occupation of other people’s lands and homes been justified and defended in this way.

Professor Abdullahi has proved to the world that we are a nation of bloodthirsty barbarians and sociopaths where human life has no meaning and has no value.

His views reveal nothing but madness in its most brazen form and the truth is that this reckless and irresponsible elderly man is playing with fire and is courting nothing but disaster for his Fulani people. Simply put he is begging for war.

I am disgusted and appalled by his cold-blooded, blood-thirsty and blood-lusting mindset but I cannot say that I am surprised. That is their way and these are their thoughts!

In addition to Abdullahi’s absurd and provocative submissions, the sceptics should also read Professor Umar Muhammed Labdo’s insulting assertions about Fulani supremacy and the Fulani being “born and destined to rule” over the whole of Nigeria.

If, after reading the contributions of these two supposedly “learned” Fulani men, some still do not understand what is going on or that we have a major challenge in this country, then such persons are indeed part of the problem and are in dire need of help.

Permit me to end the concluding part of this essay with the following.

To those who say that my words are too blunt, plain and harsh and that suggest that I should be more circumspect and temperate when discussing the powers that be in our country, the state of our nation, the Fulani invasion and our ruling Caliph, I say the following: I am the Servant of Truth and the Voice of the Voiceless.

If I do not speak up and say what others know but dare not say who will speak for the downtrodden, the enslaved, the weak, the oppressed, the slaughtered and the silent majority?

It is a calling and I cannot but do as I do and say as I say. I cannot but speak bluntly and plainly, calling a spade a spade.

In any case bullies, tyrants, conquering foreign hordes and alien invaders neither understand subtlety and restraint nor do they appreciate its nuances.

Worse still they misconstrue gentle words and a kind and generous disposition for weakness and this fuels and feeds their appetite for bestial acts and tyranny and encourages their naked aggression.

Unlike most, I fear not the heathen hordes that seek to conquer and enslave our people nor the bloody sword or the mighty roar of the uncircumcised Philistines.

I fear not the armies of Rome nor the occultic Egyptians with their satanic covenants, ancient spells and powerful invocations.

And neither will I bow, quiver or tremble before the Chaldeans or the Amalekites that rule our land with their unrelenting display of violence, barbarity and cruelty.

I am led by the Holy Spirit of the Living God and I trust in Him for all. He is my strength, my shield, my glory and the lifter of my head.

I am in the Lord’s power and hands and not in that of my adversaries or the enemies of my people. Most importantly I am persuaded that He will never leave me or forsake me.

I am also guided by the wise counsel of our very own Nobel Laureate and celebrated bard, Professor Wole Soyinka, who wrote the following historic and powerful words in his famous book titled, ‘The Man Died’ many years ago.

He wrote, “the man died in him who remained silent in the face of tyranny”.

Today I proclaim, may the man never die in any of us.

Again I am inspired by the compelling, beautiful and eternal words written by the great 19th-century author and English sage, Thomas Babington Macaulay, in his famous poem titled ‘Lays Of Ancient Rome’. He wrote,

“Then out spake brave Horatius, the Captain of the Gate: to every man upon this earth death cometh soon or late.

And how can man die better than facing fearful odds, for the ashes of his fathers and the temples of his gods?

And for the tender mother who dandled him to rest, And for the wife who nurses his baby at her breast.

And for the holy maidens who feed the eternal flame, to save them from false Sextus that wrought the deed of shame?

Haul down the bridge, Sir Consul, with all the speed ye may; I, with two more to help me, will hold the foe in play”.

Today I pray that we be like brave Horatius and hold the foe in play.

Finally, I am strengthened and encouraged by the words of King David in Psalm 27 when he said,

“The Lord is my light and my salvation, whom shall I fear?

The Lord is the stronghold of my life, of whom shall I be afraid?

When evildoers assail me uttering slanders against me, my adversaries and foes, they shall stumble and fall”.

They say courage is a virtue and the word of the Lord says “perfect love casts out fear”.

I, therefore, urge each and every one of us to cast out any and every fear of the enemy and of our collective adversaries, no matter what lies ahead or comes our way and, instead, stand firm and strong with heads held up high, giving thanks to God.

Finally, we must always remember that it is not how long we live that matters but what we stood for during our sojourn on the earthly plain, no matter how short or brief that sojourn may be.

I would rather speak truth to power, live a short life and die as a free man on my feet than remain silent in the face of slavery, tyranny and evil, and live a long life on my knees.

To Mahdi Buhari and his Fulani terrorists and herdsmen, I say this: southern Nigeria will never be ‘Fulanised’ or conquered and neither will we be Islamised.

We are and shall remain a nation of freeborn men and women, who are proud of our history and heritage and who are prepared to make the ultimate sacrifice in defence of our freedom, our faith, our values, our plurality, our land, our resources and our people.

Any attempt to enslave or subjugate us by guile, deceit, subterfuge or insincere and false notions of integration and assimilation and the force of arms shall be resisted and shall ultimately fail. Of this, I have no doubt.

May the Living God guide and defend us and may He grant us peace and justice.

(Femi Fani-Kayode is a lawyer, a Nigerian politician, an evangelical Christian, an essayist, a poet and he was the Special Assistant (Public Affairs) to President Olusegun Obasanjo from July 2003 until June 2006. He was the minister of culture and tourism of the Federal Republic of Nigeria from June 22nd to Nov 7th, 2006 and as the minister of Aviation from Nov 7th, 2006 to May 29th, 2007. He runs a syndicated column on The Trent. He tweets from@realFFK.)

http://www.twitter.com/RNNetwork1

Continue reading

Advertisements
Image

The Innoson Affair, The Igbo And The Orphans Of The Corporate World – Fani-Kayode |RN

Femi-Fani-Kayode3 (2)

By Femi Fani-Kayode

Such was his shock and anger at the turn of events that the real estate magnate and owner of the resplendent, opulent and stunningly beautiful ‘Amen Estate’ on the outskirts of Lekki in Lagos, Babatunde O. Gbadamosi, wrote the following:

“I have studied the case. I am going to withdraw ALL my funds from Guaranty Trust Bank tomorrow morning”.

The basis of his angst and consternation was the plight of the propietor of Innoson Motors at the hands of Guaranty Trust Bank, the EFCC and the Buhari administration.

Babatunde’s disgust and repugnance at the way in which the bank and the EFCC behaved accurately reflects the mood and sentiment of millions of Nigerians on this matter.

Yet in my view the matter goes much further and deeper than just GTB and the EFCC.

They are simply willing puppets, tiny minions and minor players in a much bigger game and a much wider picture.

Permit me to cross the “t”s, dot the “i”s, consider the background and look at the facts.

In the last one year alone no less than three prominent Igbo businessmen have been arrested, humiliated and detained by the Buhari administration.

All three are major employers of labour who fared extreemly well under the administration of President Goodluck Jonathan and whose companies have become household names.

The first is Cletus Ibeto of Ibeto Cement, a humble, charming, hard-working, low-profile and exceptionally profound and insightful man who I met when I was in detention last year.

The second is the ebullient, young and vocal Ifeanyi Uba of Capital Oil and Gas, who later joined politics and who was indeed a member of President Goodluck Jonathan’s campaign organisation in 2015 where we worked closely together.

The third is Innocent Chukwuma, the owner of Innoson Motors whose company is the only one in Nigeria that produces cars, who I am told is an absolute gentleman and whom I have never met.

These three men are amongst the five biggest and most prominent Igbo businessmen in the country today. The remaining two are Arthur Eze of Atlas Oronto Petroleum International and Emeka Offor of Chrome Oil both of whom have done very well but that have also had their own fair share of persecution and travails over the years.

I made a point of doing the research in the cases of Chukwuma, Ibeto and Uba and why they were having issues with the EFCC and the SSS respectively and I came to the conclusion that not only had they done nothing wrong but they were being targetted simply because they were perceived as being “Jonathan men”, because they were deemed as being sympathetic to the PDP, because they were Igbo and finally simply out of envy from ruthless competitors.

Given that it came as no surprise to me when, just yesterday morning, I was informed that Chukwuma’s home was raided and tear-gassed by the EFCC and he was arrested and detained in what can only be described as brutal and questionable circumstances.

I was reliably informed that officers of the EFCC and the Nigerian Police not only injured many in his home but that they also slapped his wife.

Never mind that he was later reportedly offered bail after what can only be described as a gruelling and harrowing period of torment and trauma: the fact is that his home should never have been raided and he should never have been arrested, detained and subjected to this brutal affront and indecorious indignity in the first place.

Such was my concern for him and the way in which the security forces had behaved at his home that I was constrained to post the following on both my twitter handle and Facebook page on that same day. I asked,

“Why should anybody be surprised about the arrest of the owner of Innoson Motors? They did the same to Cletus Ibeto about a year ago.These people come from the “wrong” part of the country and they are providing a service and employment for Nigerians. They must be punished for it!”.

I went further by offering some gentle and wise counsel to an old and dear friend by also posting the following:

“I have known the MD of GTB, Segun Agbaje and his two older brothers, Femi and Jimi, for close to 40 years and I have immense respect and deep affection for them. I urge him not to expose himself to the shark infested waters of politics by allowing himself to be used by these barbarians to destroy Innoson. If he does he will regret it”.

Yet it does not stop there. The matter goes much deeper and further than just the travails of Innocent Chukwuma of Innoson Motors or indeed those of Cletus Ibeto and Ifeanyi Uba.

It goes to the very heart and foundation of the fundamental problem of what Nigeria has been turned into by those who believe that they own her.

It touches on the nationality question, the quest and struggle for equal rights and opportunities for the various ethnic naionalities that make up Nigeria and the unofficial and unannounced policy of the Buhari administration to treat southerners as slaves and to discredit, crush and malign any Igbo person who aspires to excellence and greatness and who is a source of pride and inspiration to their people.

To those that doubt this grave assertion I have one question to ask: can they, under ANY circumstances, imagine or envisage Aliko Dangote of the Dangote Group or Abdul Samad Rabiu of the BUA Group , both of whom are highly successful, extreemly wealthy and very well-known northern Muslim Hausa-Fulani businessmen, being treated in this way by ANY Nigerian government let alone one like Buhari’s that was established by the Fulani and solely for the interests of the Fulani? The answer to the question is a resounding “no”.

Yet for the southern businessman and particularly for the Igbo one the rules are very different and the treatment that they get from the government and its security agencies are a world apart.

As a matter of fact they are unfairly deemed and insidiously labelled as the “fatherless ones” and the “orphans of the corporate world” simply because they are on their own and they have no favour or protection from government.

It is clear that any Igbo man that has the temerity and the fortitude to shine and to rise up by dint of conviction, vision, passion and hard work must be humiliated, demonised and denigrated.

The story and the theme appears to be a never-ending one and it touches on all spheres of human endeavour in Nigeria. The policy, principle and practice is the same: as long as you are Igbo you are in trouble and in order to survive you must sing the praises of the Buhari administration, bow and grovel to the Fulani, accept your servitude and slavery with stoic ignomy and “bend the knee”.

In the field of the struggle for self-determination and the quest for the establishment of the independent and sovereign state of Biafra the powers that be did it to the great Nnamdi Kanu, to his IPOB and to MASSOB.

In the field of business they have done it to the Chukwumas, the Ubas and the Ibetos of this world.

In the field of partisan politics they have done it to countless Igbo elders and leaders who have refused to bow to the Fulani hegemony that the Buhari administration represents.

In the field of the Armed Forces, the Nigerian Police Force and the various security and intelligence agencies they have done it as countless Igbo career officers have either been denied promotion and operational command or they have been prematurely retired.
Yet all this pales before the fact that thousands of young Igbo men and women have been secretly slaughtered, have been subjected to mass murder and genocide and have been buried in mass graves by agents of the Buhari government and security forces over the last two years and six months.

I have written about this over and over again simply because I believe that an attack on the Igbo is an attack on the whole of the south and is indeed an attack on humanity and all right-thinking people.

It is also an attack on the Christian faith of which I am a member because virtually every single one of the 50 million Igbos in Nigeria are Christians whilst those that are waging this unofficial and undeclared war against them are predominantly Muslims.

That is why the meeting between the Igbo and the Yoruba leaders slated for Jaunuary 11th in Enugu, under the auspices of Nzuko Umunna and which will be attended by the Obi of Onitsha, the Ooni of Ife, Afenifere, Ohanaeze and all the key Igbo and Yoruba leaders, intelligensia and politicians from all sides of the political divide is so crucial.

The Igbo and the Yoruba must set aside our dfferences, look at these matters, speak the bitter truth, come together and agree on how to move forward and protect our collective interest.

Whichever way it goes and whatever happens the matter shall come to an expected end because the God of Heaven will not sit by idly and allow this injustice and wickedness to go on for much longer.

I say this because the blood of the innocent cries to Him in heaven for vengeance and sooner or later He will hear their cry and both deliverance and judgement shall come.

In the meantime when I heard about the injustice that Innoson and his family had been subjected to I wrote the following words which came to my spirit and which burn in my soul right up until this very moment.

It is a heart-felt and powerful lamentation and it reflects the way virtually every right-thinking and sensitive southerner feels and thinks today about what is happening in Nigeria even though they may be too scared to voice it.

“O Igbo what have you done to the sons of Futa Jalon? Why do the heathans rant and rage? Why do the cow-loving aliens and foreign invaders seek to subjugate you and wipe you off the face of the earth?

In silent whispers they claim that they have cursed you, that you are not fit to rule or lead and that they hate you with a perfect hatred. Yet in 1966 you saw all this coming.

You warned us about what would happen and you tried to do something about it. Sadly we would not listen and we laughed you to scorn. You saw what we never saw. You knew what we never knew.

You suffered what we never suffered and you shed the tears that we never shed. 51 years later nothing has changed. They still kill you and rape your women. Only now they have widened the circle and it is no longer just you.

They have enslaved the rest of us as well. They kill us too and rape our women. Those of us from the South West, South South and the Middle Belt that joined forces with them to kill you and starve your children to death have now been turned into their slaves and serfs.

They kill us too and rape our women as well. They also take our land, shame our children and hate and denigrate our faith.

Yet we look on sheepishly and helplessly all in the name of keeping the peace and political correctness: we accept our pitiable plight and we suffer in silence.

The Bible asks, “what can flesh do to me?”, yet we ignore this divine injunction and holy scripture and bow our heads in trepidation and shame.

Our men have become women and we mask our accursed fear of death, destruction and incarceration and our inexplicable awe of our collective oppressors with a shameful and cowardly smile.

We readily accept every shame, every insult, every indignity and every act of savagery, brutality, barbarity and callousness that they inflict on us all for the sake of an illusionary, ephemeral, undefined and far-fetched concept known as “one Nigeria” which bears false and delusionary pretentions and claims of nationality and nationhood.

We even thank our collective oppressors and captors and we rejoice with them when they denigrate our faith and when they slaughter our children and our beloved in the fields and in the streets.

O Southern Nigeria: who has bewitched you? Cowardice is thy name.”

May God deliver us!

http://www.twitter.com/RNNetwork1

Continue reading

Image

Restructuring: You Can’t Treat Unequals Equally, El-Rufai Tells Igbo, Others |RN

 

 

nasirel_rufai

Governor of Kaduna State, Nasir El-Rufai

ABUJA — Amid agitation by leaders of the South East for the creation of an additional state in the zone, Kaduna State governor and chairman of ruling All Progressives Congress, APC, Committee on True Federalism, Mallam Nasir El-Rufai, has declared that it would be a grave injustice to agitate for “equal by unequals”.

 

According to him, even in population and resources, the regions of the country are not uniformly endowed.

He, however, said though the representatives of the agitators were few in number, “the majority must always win.”

Speaking at a town hall meeting organised by his committee to get inputs from youths, the governor said when people talk about restructuring, most proponents think of their zones while no one thinks of the country.

He said: “The greatest injustice is trying to make equals unequal and unequal equal; things are not done like that. What do I mean by that? There are those who have said that Nigeria and United States are the same.

“It is just like saying everyone who is six feet, five can play basketball. As human beings, we are equal but you cannot come and stand here and say we should create nine states in each zone, Nigeria is not equal, likewise the population and resources, you can’t do that.

“The representatives of the agitators are few in number and so the majority must always win. The president of the country exists, the Senate exists and there are 36 states of the federation.

‘’We the old ones are still here, some of us are good, some are bad, like the youths but you must learn to live with us because we are still here.

“Now, some people say because we have oil, let us have resource control. We must think of what is in the overall interest of Nigeria.

‘’By that, I mean what works for everyone. Because what works for one part of the county will not necessarily work for the other and so as long as we are from one country, we must seek for what is of the common good, not the one that serves one interest group.

http://www.twitter.com/RNNetwork1

Continue reading

Image

Your Claim That Nigeria’s Unity Is Settled Not Tenable, Southern Leaders Tell Buhari |RN

 Buhariworksfromhome
                        President Muhammadu Buhari

Olalekan Adetayo and Gbenga Adeniji

The Southern Leaders Forum on Wednesday in Lagos faulted President Muhammadu Buhari’s statement that issues of national discourse should be taken to the National Assembly and the National Council of State.

Buhari made the statement among others in his Monday broadcast after a 104-day medical trip to the United Kingdom.

Related: Nigeria’s Unity Not Negotiable, Says Buhari |The Republican News

The forum, represented by Chiefs Edwin Clark, Albert Horsfall (South-South); Chief John Nwodo, Prof. Joe Irukwu (South-East); and Chief Reuben Fasoranti, Chief Ayo Adebanjo (South-West), spoke in Lagos at a press conference titled, ‘Only Restructuring will Ensure the Unity, Peace and Development of Nigeria.’

Others at the event included Prof. Banji Akintoye, Tony Uranta, National Coordinator of the Oodua Peoples Congress, Chief Gani Adams; Supo Shonibare, Guy Ikokwu, Tony Nyiam and Prof. Walter Ofonagoro.

The forum stated that while it did not dispute the legality of the National Assembly and NCS, the bodies were not the appropriate bodies to superintend the discourse on the social contract that could bind Nigeria together.

“While the composition of the National Assembly is clearly jigged and indeed one of the bodies to be restructured, the National Council of State is not open to Nigerians. If any discourse is to take place on constitutional changes within the democratic framework, Mr President is the one who has the responsibility to initiate the process,” the SLF said.

The forum added that the attempt to treat hate speech as terrorism was a veiled threat to bare fangs and criminalising dissenting opinions in the national discourse.

The group accused the President of deploying the imagery of the late Chief Emeka Ojukwu in his broadcast to play down the demand for the renegotiation of the structure of Nigeria by saying they both agreed in Daura in 2003 that the country must remain one and united.

The SLF said, “The meeting between the two of them could not have been a Sovereign National Conference whose decisions cannot be reviewed. We agree with their conclusion that we should remain united, but that does not foreclose discussions of the terms and conditions of the union.

Related IPOB Releases Statement In Response To Buhari’s Broadcast, Meeting Ojukwu In 2003 |RN

“The claim that Nigeria’s unity is settled and not negotiable is not tenable. Every country is in a daily dialogue and there is nothing finally settled in its life. Stable nations are still fine-tuning details of the architecture of their existence. How much more Nigeria that has yet to attain nationhood? If we are settled as a nation, we will not be dealing with the many crises of nation-building that are afflicting us today, which have made it extremely difficult to squarely face issues of growth and development.

“The British negotiated to put the various ethnic groups together. All the constitutional conferences held in the years before independence were negotiations. When the North walked out of the parliament in 1953 after Chief Anthony Enahoro moved the motion for independence, it took negotiations to bring them back into the union after an eight-point agenda, which was mainly about confederations.”

It pointed out that the one sentence in the President’s speech that every Nigerian could live anywhere without let or hindrance if meant to address the quit notice by Arewa youths to the Igbo living in the North was too short to check the unwarranted threat.

The group further said it was miffed by Buhari’s description of the attacks by deadly Fulani herdsmen on defenceless farmers as a conflict between two quarrelling groups.

“To present the various onslaughts on farmers by the herdsmen as ‘two fighting,’ would portray the President as taking sides with the aggressive Meyitti Allah. While we do not hold the administration responsible for all agitations in Nigeria due to the crises of a unitary constitution, there are clearly many errors of commission and omission that have accentuated the strong self-determination feelings across the country which only restructuring can tame,” the group said.

According to the leaders, some of the errors made by the current administration are lopsided recruitment and appointment into federal institutions, breach of the Federal Character principle, early retirement of mostly Southern senior officers from the Armed Forces and other security services and concentration of most heads of Armed Forces and other national security agencies in a section of the country.

The group identified others to include the appointment of the legal adviser of Meyitti Allah as the secretary of the Federal Character Commission, indifference to the deadly activities of herdsmen and the President’s declaration that he could not treat those who gave him five per cent votes equally with those who gave him 97 per cent votes in the 2015 presidential election.

The Southern elders noted that having spent most part of their lives fighting for the country’s unity based on justice, fairness and equity, it was necessary to urge the President to realise the mess the country was in and exhibit statesmanship and not ethnic, religious, regional and political partisanship in renegotiating Nigeria along federal lines to tackle separatist feelings and agitations.

No united Nigeria without restructuring, says N’Delta agitators

Some Niger Delta agitators on Wednesday faulted the position taken by President Buhari on the calls for restructuring.

They said without restructuring as being suggested by prominent Nigerians, the nation would not remain united.

The agitators’ position was contained in a statement made available to journalists in Abuja.

Signatories to the statement included John Duku (Niger Delta Watchdogs); Ekpo Ekpo (Niger Delta Volunteers); Osarolor Nedam (Niger Delta Warriors); Henry Okon Etete (Niger Delta Peoples Fighters); Asukwo Henshaw (Bakassi Freedom Fighters); Ibinabo Horsfall (Niger Delta Movement for Justice); Duke Emmanson (Niger Delta Fighters Network) and Inibeghe Adams (Niger Delta Freedom Mandate).

“We wish to thank all well-meaning Nigerians who threw their weight behind restructuring and disassociated themselves from the President’s position on restructuring.

“We want to remind him (the President) that without restructuring, there would be no united Nigeria,” the agitators said.

They said they were surprised that the President said the unity of Nigeria was not negotiable when “indeed he did not believe in other Nigerians apart from those from the North.”

They insisted that Northerners and the Yoruba must leave their region before October 1.

“The Coalition of Arewa Youths’ quit notice to Igbo was in collaboration with the Northern elders, the President’s cabal and top security chiefs from the North. They were properly consulted by the youths.

“Therefore, we maintain our previous position that Northerners and Yorubas should vacate the Niger Delta region before October 1, 2017, until justice is done,” the statement read.

The agitators called on Buhari to reshuffle the Federal Executive Council, as well as appointments to boards of agencies and parastatals in a manner that would reflect federal character.

They also called for the return of oil blocks to natives of the region and the immediate relocation of the oil companies’ headquarters to their operational base, as well as relocation of the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation’s headquarters to the Niger Delta region.

They claimed that over 75 per cent of the oil blocks in the Niger Delta region were owned by Northerners, 20 per cent by Yoruba, three per cent by Igbo and the remaining two per cent of people of the region.

“We can no longer tolerate this injustice, marginalisation and be treated as slaves in our own land. We, therefore, demand that the Northerners should return 70 per cent and Yorubas 15 per cent of their oil blocks to the Niger Delta people for justice to prevail,” they said.

They claimed that they had put all machinery in place to protect Niger Delta from external forces, adding that they would not hesitate to bring the Nigerian economy to a standstill.

The Presidency advises Nigerians against harsh words

The Presidency on Wednesday advised opinion leaders in the country to exercise restraint in their choice of words as they criticise Buhari based on his position on restructuring.

The Senior Special Assistant to the President on Media and Publicity, Garba Shehu, gave the advice in a statement.

Shehu said the restraint was necessary to avoid heating up the polity and causing acrimony across the country.

He noted that while Nigerians are free to express themselves, they should “exercise such liberty with restraint and a sense of responsibility.”

The presidential spokesman said calling Buhari an enemy of Nigeria was in “extremely bad taste.”

He added that nothing in the President’s service record would justify “such scurrilous language.”

Shehu said he was satisfied that majority of Nigerians welcomed Buhari’s broadcast.

He, however, said it was off the mark to criticise him for not responding to calls for restructuring.

“To criticise the President for not imposing a restructuring on the country – whatever that means – is completely off the mark,” he said.

Shehu said Buhari had no power to impose a restructuring on the country by military fiat.

He said National Assembly members were the elected representatives of the people who can handle agitations for restructuring and other constitutional changes.

He explained that the President is constitutionally bound to work with the National Assembly to deal with such issues, reminding critics that the President would not exercise arbitrary powers or bypass the legislature in taking fundamental decisions.

He added, “Changes don’t happen on a whim in a democracy. The ‘immediate effect’ military mentality cannot work under a democratic order.

“Since the President has sworn to defend the constitution, he would remain faithful to that oath by working with the legislature in taking major decisions on the future of Nigeria’s federal system.

“The country’s parliament is ready and willing to discuss all issues but the pundits are more interested in TV and newspaper headlines.

“Threats don’t work in a democracy. Democracy requires planning and proper process. Issues are resolved through established processes, not by abuses, insults or irresponsible statements.”

Buhari cancels FEC meeting, receives probe report

The meeting of the Federal Executive Council that holds every week did not hold on Wednesday.

The Special Adviser to the President on Media and Publicity, Mr Femi Adesina, did not disclose the reason behind the decision to cancel the meeting.

This is just as Vice President Yemi Osinbajo on Wednesday submitted the report of the committee that investigated allegations against the suspended Secretary to the Government of the Federation, Babachir Lawal; and the Director-General of the National Intelligence Agency, Ayo Oke, to Buhari.

The committee, which had the Attorney-General of the Federation, Abubakar Malami (SAN); and the National Security Adviser, Babagana Monguno, as members, was initially billed to submit its report to Buhari on May 8, 2017, but could not do so because the President left the country on May 7 for London.

Speaking to State House correspondents after submitting the report, Osinbajo declined to divulge the details of the report.

He said the ball was in the President’s court to study the report and take his decision.

He said, “It is a fact-finding committee and our terms of reference were to find out what transpired in the cases; one involving the SGF and the other, the DG of NIA.

“We have concluded our job and we submitted a full report with recommendations to the President.

“We cannot, of course, give you any detail because the President has to look at the report, study it and then make his own decisions based on the report.”

Osinbajo said members of the committee were fair-minded, adding that justice was done in all cases.

He said it was in the interest of the nation that things were done properly.

When asked how soon Nigerians should be expecting the President’s decision on the report, the Vice President said, “All I can say now is that we have submitted the report to the President and it is a very detailed report as a matter of fact. The President has to study the report and make decisions.

On whether heads will roll based on the report, the Vice President said, “How can I tell you? If you want to know that, you have to wait. You really have to wait.”

Present at the brief ceremony where Osinbajo presented the report to the President were the two other members of the committee and the Chief of Staff to the President, Abba Kyari.

The President had on April 19 suspended Lawal and Oke and constituted a three-man committee led by Osinbajo to investigate them.

The panel investigated allegations of violations of law and due process made against Lawal in the award of contracts under the Presidential Initiative on the North-East while it probed Oke on the discovery of large amounts of foreign and local currencies by the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission in a residential apartment at Osborne Towers, Ikoyi, Lagos, for which NIA is laying claim to.   (Punchng.com)

http://www.twitter.com/RNNetwork1

Continue reading

Image

No Restructuring, No 2019 Election -Southern Leaders |The Republican News

SouthernLeaders

Archive photo: Southern Leaders Forum summit 2015

By Chinelo Obogo

Prominent leaders from the Southern part of the country yesterday said without restructuring and devolution of powers, there may be no general election in 2019.

This formed part of the discussion held at a colloquium on restructuring organised by the Island Club, Lagos.

The colloquium titled ‘Restructuring: Challenges, implications and the way forward’, was attended by prominent leaders in the South West, South East, South South and the North.

Niger Delta activist, Annkio Briggs, who was one of the discussants said she had the mandate of the Niger Delta people to speak on their behalf. She said if the country does not restructure, there would not be elections in 2019.

Annkio Briggs said: “The country is like a moving train without brakes and in order not to crash, we need to restructure. All regions must come together and agree on restructuring and everybody must say what restructuring means to them, and we must agree on restructuring before 2019 election. There is so much injustice in the country.

“For instance, there are 419 local governments in the North and 365 local government in the South and the North gets far more resources from the Federal Government than the people producing oil in the country. Niger Delta is producing more and getting less.

We must have a new constitution or we can use the 1963 constitution and work on it. We can have a new constitution that will take care of these injustices like the issue of Fulani herdsmen and religion. If we cannot restructure, we should call the zones together to call for a referendum, so that each zone can determine how they want to live.”

The lead discussant, Prof. Stephen Adebanji Akintoye, said the federal government has become inefficient and corrupt because of oil revenue from the Niger Delta. He said the abandonment of export products that were helping Nigeria has become a problem. 

“Restructuring has become inescapable for Nigerians. The struggle for a rational federal structure has been a major concern since we were young men. Nigeria needs to restructure due to the harsh effect of the federal structure of Nigeria. Youths in South-East, Niger Delta and South-West are telling us that they do not want to be part of Nigeria anymore. It is under this that the cry for restructuring is growing louder.

“Some people are saying restructuring is a confusing idea and I dare say their strategy is clever, but not clever enough. We want a federalism that is widely accepted and the best structure is federalism whereby each zone would be a federating unit and control and develop its own resources for the good of its people. This is the only solution to our nationality problem.The structure we operated in 1963 was very productive because each region had its constitution and controlled its resources,” he said.

Prof. John Ogu, a former Deputy governor of Ebonyi State, who represented the President General of Ohanaeze Ndigbo, John Nwodo, said the marginalisation of the South-East and the unfair treatment meted out to the Igbo from the end of the civil war till date were the factors that aided the rise of separatist groups like the Indigenous Peoples of Biafra (IPOB).

He said: “What IPOB is doing now is a cry for justice.They are saying the Igbo have been treated very badly and have been marginalised since the civil war ended, and it is only restructuring that can remedy some of those wrongs. It can be done by amending the 1999 Constitution holistically or by creating a new constitution. “Restructuring does not mean the disintegration of the country, but making Nigeria a federation and changing the unitary system of government, that the military handed to us, to a federal system of government to ensure security.”

The former governor of Ondo State, Olusegun Mimiko, said restructuring is not about the North against the South.

“Restructuring is decentralising power to make a way from distribution and consuming arrangement for every federating units to increase its financial resources for development. The country is on a precipice. No one can predict what will happen on October 1. Any country that cannot boast of security for its citizens and property is not worthy of being called a country. We need to have state and local police to protect the lives of citizens and property. The ruling party has said voters should not vote for the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) in 2019 because of restructuring, so we are now watching to see whether the All Progressives Congress (APC) will restructure before 2019.”

A former Minister of Information, Labaran Maku, agreed with the consensus on restructuring. He said: “Nigeria needs restructuring. It offers Africa and Africans a great hope if we can reform the structure and its internal powers. The majority of us believe that restructuring will make Nigeria a great country, and these kinds of debates are needed to ensure that restructuring works.”

Ayo Adebanjo, a chieftain of Afenifere chastised northern leaders who are opposed to restructuring. “The military introduced this constitution which thrives on a unitary system of government, but you cannot run Nigeria on a military system of government because we have so many ethnic groups. We have passed that stage where people will try to make us think that restructuring is new. It is not. We must restructure now or the country may not survive. The North does not want to agree on restructuring because they are beneficiaries of the awkwardness of this 1999 constitution which was thrust on us by the military” he said.

General Alani Akinrinade condemned what he described as the deafening silence from most prominent northern elders over the quit notice given to the Igbo living the north before October 1 by northern youths.

He said: “Besides a few northern elders who criticised the northern youths for the quit notice given to the Igbo, I am sad that most of the elders I expected to have condemned it has maintained a deafening silence.”  (The Sun)

http://www.twitter.com/RNNetwork1

Continue reading

Image

Those Calling For Restructure Are Pursuing Hidden Agenda, Says Tanko Yakasi |RN

As the issue of the need to restructure Nigeria continues to dominate public discourse, Elder statesman, Alhaji Tanko Yakasai, has maintained his stand that the call was suspicious.

In this interview with VINCENT KALU, the Chairman of the Northern Elders Council (NEC), said those agitating for restructuring have hidden agenda. He challenged them to come up with a blueprint on what restructuring is all about.

In an interview with your co-elder statesman, Chief Ayo Adebanjo, he warned that if Nigeria is not restructured that there shouldn’t be 2019 general elections; that restructuring should precede 2019. What’s your view on this, do you subscribe to his position?

Both Adebanjo and I, fought for the independence of Nigeria, and I’m older than him about two years, but we joined politics about the same time, some 35 years ago.

At this age, you don’t negotiate with an ultimatum; you can’t give an issue an ultimatum. I’m not opposed to restructuring, and I have never heard that North was opposed to restructuring. However, my quarrel with those clamouring for restructuring is that they are yet to bring out the blueprint for it. What are the blueprints; why are those proponents of restructuring afraid of unfolding their agenda? They have a hidden agenda.

Everybody is afraid of a hidden agenda. Why hidden agenda on this matter?    

This is a matter that affects the lives of all Nigerians. They should put it in black and white and what it should look like.

Going back to regions, personally, I have no problem with that, because they started complaining that the North was so big and bigger than the two regions in the South put together.

This is the creation of God. When the British came and conquered Nigeria, they didn’t know which side was South and which was North, they just started conquering one after the other. After conquering the South, they moved to the North.

There is no issue, if you want us to go back to the three regions, so be it, but put it in black and white and let it be documented that this is what restructuring would look like.

I know what they have and I know why they are hiding it, but I want them to come out with their own plans of how Nigeria would look like in their own conception and then we come out with our own position. We are not one person, we are people, and we can’t react in the same way, but each individual will then evaluate the situation.

As long as Nigerians don’t understand what restructuring means, it cannot be meaningful to them. Even what Atiku and Babangida said is only in respect of devolution of powers, which is different from restructuring. Devolution of powers, there is no problem.

What they said amounts to the devolution of powers. Devolution of powers is transferring items from the Exclusive List to the Concurrent List.

There was a time the Kano State Government set up a committee during the constitutional amendment exercise, I presided over a subcommittee of that committee that dealt with the devolution, we also recommended some of the items that should be transferred to Concurrent List. Devolution of powers is a different thing from restructuring.

If you look at the time of the old constitutional conferences in Nigeria, there were two things that are put into no-go areas. The first is the unity of Nigeria and the second is the federal arrangement of Nigeria.

At the time of Sani Abacha, they didn’t say it black and white but at the time of Babangida, he put it there in black and white that you cannot discuss the issue of unity of Nigeria or the federal structure or arrangement of Nigeria. Those ones were the no-go area.

Do you mean since the talk of restructuring started, there is yet to be a paper on how it is going to be?

There are yet to come out with paper on how it is going to work. The clamour is suspicion and people are wondering why it is so difficult for them to come up with a blueprint on this matter that affects the future of every Nigerian.

So, if you are advocating for something that affects the lives of Nigerians, why can’t you bring it in black and white in writing for people to see.

Chief Adebanjo said Sardauna supported the Independent Constitution and queried whether you that are opposed to it, are more northerner than the late premier?

I think there is a mistake there. We had three national figures – Dr Nnamdi Azikiwe, Chief Awolowo and Sardauna.

At the 1953/54 Constitutional Conference, Zik went with the programme for a unitary form of government, which we were operating at that time. Even members of the National Assembly- House of Representatives were elected by state electoral college because it was unitary.

After the conference, we adopted a federal constitution, which we are operating till today.

The difference is that in those days, the regions had their own constitutions, but operated under a constitution that defined their certain powers in the national constitution. That is the difference.

The national constitution didn’t give any region the power to secede from Nigeria.

Secondly, it is not correct that 50 per cent of the revenue generated by the regions were given to them.

The 50 per cent revenue given to the originator regions were in respect of mineral. It was the elements of ground rents and royalty of which 50 per cent were given to the originating region, as against what is obtained now that we give 13 per cent of the total revenue to the bearing state.

The constitution we are operating now is the same constitution with the Independent and Republican Constitutions. If you go through those constitutions, you can see that the items on the Exclusive Lists now were the same then.

What happened is that they created more states, that is, instead of three or four regions; they created 36 states, which we have been operating for more than 20 years now.

In any case, that constitution he is talking about is what is in operation now.  It has not changed; the only thing that has changed is the number of regions that had been replaced by states, from three to four regions and to 36 states now.

Where do we go from here?

We should respect the structures created by democracy in Nigeria.

There is also the argument that the present constitution was forced down our throats by the military and does not represent the wishes of the people?

We have been obeying the military, and nobody revolted against the military.

Ayo is a lawyer, doesn’t he go to court? Who created the court, is it not the same constitution? Is it not the same military constitution that created the court?

The court was created by the constitution done by the military. Why did he recognize it? The same constitution he doesn’t approve is the same constitution he operates with. You can’t choose one and deny the other. Anybody who doesn’t want the constitution promulgated by the military shouldn’t go to the court created by the same constitution.

Rotimi Williams and Ben Nwabueze came up with the constitution that said, ‘we the people of Nigeria …’, and signed by Obasanjo.

When the constitution was promulgated, Nwabueze didn’t go to protest, Ayo kept quiet, and I kept quiet and others. Nobody in Nigeria protested.

Our leaders, Dr Nnamdi Azikiwe, Chief Awolowo, Malam Aminu Kano, and others accorded recognition to that constitution, they didn’t object to it because it was promulgated by the military, and therefore, they contested elections under the same constitution created by the military.

The 1979 Constitution, equally promulgated by the military in the same way Abdulsalami signed the 1999 Constitution, and elections were conducted, where Obasanjo emerged, Yar’Adua emerged, Jonathan emerged.

Why should we accept the result, why should we respect the National Assembly, states Assembly created by the same constitution promulgated by the military.

So, there is no reason whatsoever that you say that you would not recognise the 1999 Constitution because it was created by the military.  (The Sun)

http://www.twitter.com/RNNetwork1

Continue reading

Image

Can Restructuring Still Save Nigeria? – By Yinka Odumakin

Afenifere is a self-determination platform for the Yoruba.

Yinka Odumakin, an Afenifere Leader, was a delegate at the 2014 National Conference

A freelance American journalist, Brian Hall, was one of the last outsiders permitted to freely take a tour of Yugoslavia during the final days of its existence. From early May to mid-September 1991, he interacted with members of the various Balkan “tribes” in Zagreb, Belgrade, Sarajevo and points in-between, taking notes of their comments on their history, prejudices, superstitions, fears, aspirations and opinions of other ethnic and national groups. He wrote a book titled “The Impossible Country: A Journey Through the Last Days of Yugoslavia” in which he described the last days of peaceful coexistence among Yugoslavia’s religious and ethnic communities and highlighted conflicts that would trigger the horrors of “ethnic cleansing” and war.

In the gripping account of the former Yugoslavia’s decay and collapse in 1991, Hall’s powerful sense of location and mentality is expressed through a blend of close friendships, high-level interviews, and courageous questions. Hall moved comfortably among Serbs who perceived the nation as a “super personality”, Croats who remained ambivalent toward their World War II fascist regime, and Muslims like Bosnian president, Alijah Izetbegović, who claimed only the “freedom to define themselves as a people.” By January 1992, the Socialist Republic of Yugoslavia ceased to exist having dissolved into its constituent units.

Murderous Fulani Herdsmen

It is only those blinded by hegemonic desire for domination and control that cannot see today that Nigeria presently is wobbling through its last days regardless of whether a Brian Hall is travelling through it or not. Never in the history of this country (save for the civil war years) has there been the level of bloodletting currently going on along its fault lines. There is hardly any day one opens the newspapers now and don’t read of Fulani herdsmen dispatching innocent souls to the great beyond in the hapless Southern and Middle Belt communities of the country. Shorn of pretenses, these hitherto stick-wielding herdsmen who are now the only group “officially” sanctioned armed group in Nigeria (not one of them has been arrested for wielding AK 47 rifles in public) are out on an expansionist mission as the level of violence they are unleashing cannot be about cattle rearing.

Images of woes from Northern Nigeria, Waves of terror originating from Northern Region put tremendous stress on the pre-existing geopolitical fault lines that negate “unity” of Nigeria

As a child, I remember how we used to run after their forebears who grazed animals in our communities without any harm befalling us. The President of the Christian Association of Nigeria (CAN), Reverend Olasupo Ayokunle, a few days ago, was moved to deliver a timely warning to the Federal Government on the unhinged monstrosity of the Fulani herdsmen. In asking for the Federal Government to prosecute the herdsmen arrested in connection with the recent killings in Benue and Southern Kaduna to ease tension in the two states, he declared: “We also want the Federal Government to investigate, through intelligence gathering, those unpatriotic Nigerians supplying the herdsmen with weapons being used to perpetrate evil. “If the government fails to stop the provocation by the Fulani herdsmen militia, they should be prepared for war. No ethnic group has a monopoly of violence and no ethnic group should be a monster to others.”

The CAN President summed up the hopelessness and frustration in the country today as there is official indifference to the ruthlessness and criminality that is going on as the marauders have set evil loose on their host communities. Given the happenings in Nigeria presently, rational thinking dictates that those who think that the only possible means of survival is milking others would, at least, be interested in the continued corporate existence of Nigeria by cooperating with reforms that could extend the life span of the entity, but hail no. They would rather become much more insensitive and unfeeling. They have continued to task the long sufferings of patriots who stand in the gap between Nigeria and disintegration by campaigning for restructuring.

On May 2, I travelled in company of some compatriots from the Southwest to Abuja to join our former colleagues at the 2014 National Conference for some reunion. On the eve of the meeting, one Bashiru Dalhatu was circulating a text message to Northern delegates not to attend the meeting as his rebel group of Northern Delegates Forum (NDF) had met earlier to declare the reports dead and buried. Attendance from the North at the meeting, however, proved that Dalhatu was representing only his fraction of the country that he misnamed the “North”. He could not have been speaking for those communities in the North whose killers, instead of being arrested, are being compensated with taxpayers’ money. Neither could he have represented Southern Borno where Elder Paul Bassey told the meeting was still under heavy bombardment from Boko Haram despite official claim by government that it has been degraded.

Minders of the Sokoto Caliphate. Chairman of the Northern Elders Council, NEC, Alhaji Tanko Yakassai

Those who still engage their brains, of course, know that you cannot exchange commanders of a murderous group for innocent Chibok girls if indeed you are not claiming false victory. One poignant message from Elder Bassey to the meeting was that all the reconstruction the Federal Government is spending fortunes on is concentrated only in Northern Borno with total and virtual neglect of the Southern Borno communities, whereas the hegemonists talk of “one North” glibly. We left the Abuja meeting that faithful Tuesday with a beautiful communique signed insisting on the implementation of the 2014 National Conference recommendations under the chairmanship of Alhaji Tanko Yakkasai.

The following day saw the presentation of a book by General Alani Akinrinade in Lagos during which the need to restructure Nigeria came on the front burner from speaker after speaker. By Thursday, Alhaji Yakkasai was already telling The Sun Newspapers that Southwest leaders campaigning for restructuring are envious of the North and are unpatriotic. I had to check “envy” and “unpatriotic” in the dictionary again to be sure the elder statesman cannot be right. Any doubt about Taqqiya (deception) at play was put to rest when Alhaji Yakassai told The Guardian of May 12: “I have always suspected the motive behind such clamor (restructuring). The whole idea is to deny the North its God-given advantage of population and landmass which it has effectively used to earn appreciable allocation from the Federal Government. Those behind it are not interested in Nigeria’s unity and progress.”

This is the crux of the matter for the Yakassais of the North as exemplified also by the Northern Elders Forum (NEF) which met in Kano a few days back. And what it all says is that we are dealing with the deepest contradictions flowing from clash of civilizations which are nonnegotiable. It is like the notorious man, Leo Tolstoy, talked about who said he would do all humanly possible to ease the lot of the fellow he was riding on his back, except getting off it. It is clear at this point that the Nigerian contradiction has gone beyond restructuring.

I watched the President General of Ohanaeze Ndigbo on Channels TV years back showing his deep understanding of the Yoruba language as he waxed eloquent on the Nigerian situation. He said when something is damaged, the Yoruba would say “o ti ra” (it is rotten). And that when it is irretrievably damaged, they will say “o ti se din” (it is maggot-infested). Nigeria is already maggot-infested. Maybe, it’s about time campaigners for restructuring suspend this appeasement and see how long the hegemonists can run this contraption before it answers the call of nature.

Culled from Vanguard Newspaper

http://www.twitter.com/RNNetwork1

Continue reading