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South Africa Goes Into Recession, Against Predictions Of Growth |The Republican News

           South African president Cyril Ramaphosa

South Africa’s economy tipped into recession as it shrunk 0.7 percent in the second quarter, official data showed Tuesday, dealing a blow to President Cyril Ramaphosa who came to office in February.

The downturn, which was the second consecutive quarter of negative growth, was driven by contractions in agriculture, transport, trade and manufacturing industries.

StatsSA said agriculture was hit by a fall in field crops, drought in the Western Cape and severe hailstorms in Mpumalanga province that damaged production.

After a revised 2.6 percent contraction in the first quarter, the latest data piled pressure on Ramaphosa who has promised a “new dawn” after his predecessor Jacob Zuma’s scandal-tainted nine-year reign.

Micheal Power, an asset manager at Investec, said domestic and international events had combined to stall economic growth.

“We are getting no help from the outside with the strengthening dollar, the escalating trade war and issues that are now facing emerging markets,” he told AFP.

“In some respects, this can be seen as a good thing if it means that we are now not drinking to avoid the hangover.”

The recession is the first in South Africa since the 2008–2009 global financial crisis, when South Africa experienced three consecutive quarters of economic decline.

Before Tuesday’s data, Bloomberg said only one of 12 economists surveyed had predicted a contraction.

Independent analyst Daniel Silke said on Twitter that the figures reflected an “inability to create confidence-building measures to enhance work opportunities and uplift investor sentiment.”

Ramaphosa, who faces elections in 2019, has been on an investment drive to attract foreign investment and tackle unemployment of about 28 percent.

(AFP)

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How Nigerians Are Killed In South Africa In Tales Of Torture, Murder |RN

By Juliana Francis

 

On April 21, Nigerians woke up to hear the horrifying news of the murder of Clement Nwaogu in South Africa. Although Nwaogu was not the first Nigerian who had been killed by the xenophobic South Africans, the manner of his murder had people dashing to catch the vomiting bowl. According to horrified witnesses, Nwaogu was burnt alive by an angry mob. Incidentally, some South African policemen were said to have stood, watching as the mob made preparation and set Nwaogu on fire.

His screams of pains didn’t touch the frenzied crowd, let alone the policemen, who had sworn to protect lives and property as they received their commissions and police badges. The Publicity Secretary of the Nigeria Union in South Africa, Mr Habib Miller, told our correspondent on the phone that Nwaogu, from Anambra State, was attacked and killed by a mob in Rustenburg, North West Province. Miller said that the victim was murdered over his accent and habit, which the killers found offensive.

He added: “The mob descended on him with all sorts of dangerous weapons, as if he was a criminal, in the presence of South African police officers. Eyewitnesses said the victim beckoned for help from the police to intervene and help him, but they didn’t.

When Nwaogu could no longer persevere, he ran and the mob chased and caught him, poured petrol on him and set him ablaze.” Nwaogu was married to a South African and was blessed with two children; aged five and three.

Nwaogu’s murder followed the killing of ThankGod Okoro (30) by the South African Police Flying Squad. Okoro, from Enugu State, was shot dead at Hamburg, Florida West Rand, Johannesburg on April 9.

It appears that no month goes by without one Nigerian getting killed, attacked or tortured. Nigerians in South African were still mourning Nwaogu and Okoro when two more Nigerians were killed this month.

The murder of the two, Francis Ochuba and Chidi Ibebuike, brought the official number of those killed since February 2016 to 118. It is believed that many others had been murdered, which fellow Nigerians do not know about. They are Nigerians in South Africa, who had simply disappeared into thin air.

Till date, nobody knows their whereabouts. Ochuba, a property owner, was shot dead alongside his estate agent, a female South African on May 5. They were killed while visiting the tenant occupying Ochuba’s house to collect rent.

The incident occurred in Central Johannesburg. Ibebuike, on the other hand, was shot at the entrance to his house at Hazyview in Mpumalanga on May 13 and his car taken. In January, perturbed by the escalating cases of Nigerians being attacked and killed, some Nigerians in South Africa staged a peaceful protest.

South African police swooped on them. They have been in detention since then. Most times, when these killings are being carried out, the killers gleefully record them in video and later upload the videos to YouTube. Many reasons had been attributed to the continued murder of Nigerians in South Africa by the natives.

Nigerians have been accused of often being connected to drug trafficking, prostitution and human trafficking rings. Other absurd reasons are that Nigerians are picking the choice jobs, accommodation and women in South Africa.

But whatever the reasons, Nigerians living in South Africa are today calling for the end of the xenophobic attacks and threats. According to them, their wives and children are now living in fear, with their lives being daily threatened.

This was even as they alleged that the Nigerian government was not doing enough to ensure their protection. Miller said that a violent group in Rustenburg had earlier given Nigerians notice to vacate the area or get killed. According to him, since the order was issued, there have been numerous cases of Nigerians being kidnapped with ransom paid to their abductors.

Miller said that the 14 Nigerians in custody protested the murder of a Nigerian by policemen on December 17 after they failed to extort money from the deceased. Miller noted that the police officers had since been released on bail while those who protested the killing were still languishing in detention.

He added: “We’re worried that nothing has been done by the Nigerian government to stop the killings. We once again call on the Nigerian mission in South Africa to do the needful urgently because things are getting out of hand.”

There have been allegations that so many Nigerians are arrested and abandoned in South African prisons. Miller said: “We are not sure of the number of Nigerians incarcerated in South Africa but we have intentions of finding out.” Worried by the increasing killings, he said: “It’s important to note that a violent group in Rustenburg has given Nigerians in the North West Province a quit or be killed without notice. Since January that the threat was issued, there have been numerous cases of Nigerians kidnapped and ransom remitted to abductors before they were liberated.

Mr Desmond, from Niger Delta, whose loved ones couldn’t afford to pay the ransom requested by his abductors, was inhumanely killed. Furthermore, there have been reports of eight cars belonging to Nigerians burnt.

Houses occupied by Nigerians are often ransacked and Nigerians are molested and injured. Looting of Nigerian-owned businesses and a threat to lives of Nigerians are occurring on a daily basis. Nigerians in Rustenburg still live in fear.”

He said that most of the men killed were breadwinners of their families in South Africa and Nigeria. Miller added: “The untold anguish, hardship, pain and disorientation they suffered were unimaginable and it calls for deeper reflections.

“Our government officials, who are supposed to pressurise their South African counterparts on these killings, harassment and looting of Nigerian businesses, claimed it was as a result of the illegalities our nationals are involved in. It’s unfortunate that such stance is taken to probably cover the government’s helplessness. South Africa is not the only country with Nigerian immigrants, but why so many killings?

The Nigerian Union of South Africa does not condone crime in any form, but we ask that whoever a suspect should be charged and dealt with. Our advice to the Nigerian government representatives in South Africa is to channel their energy towards eradicating the major complexities Nigerians face in South Africa, which include untimely termination of lives, harassment and business looting.”

The Senior Special Assistant to the President on Foreign Affairs and Diaspora, Mrs Abike Dabiri-Erewa, said that the Nigerian government was aware of the arrest and incarceration of the 14 Nigerians and was doing something about it. She said: “The residents of that community have threatened that if the Nigerians on trial are released on bail and return to that community, they would burn all the houses linked to Nigerians there.

They accuse Nigerians of being involved in drugs and prostitution. Nigerians were also accused of taking houses that belong to low-income South Africans and using them for crime-related activities.” Dabiri-Erewa explained that during the last hearing of the case of the 14 Nigerians, which took place a few weeks ago, the lawyer representing the suspects had to be escorted by diplomatic police. The trial was witnessed by officials of the Nigerian High Commission and Consulate.

The lawyer was escorted because the residents have also threatened to deal with anyone who made it possible for the suspects to be released on bail. She said: “Recall that in fulfilment of that threat, a Nigerian found in that area was burnt alive, three days after the last court hearing.

“While we appeal to Nigerians to stay away from crime and violence, South Africans’ killing of Nigerians is not the solution. “The embassy and consulate have been in talks with South African authorities on this. Embassy and consulate officials are meeting with local police, local communities and Nigerians in several communities. They are being proactive now to cement relations with the host communities.”

There are several solutions to check rising cases of Nigerians being killed in South Africa. There has to be more sensitisation and awareness between Nigerians and South Africans, in particularly hostile communities. And most importantly, Nigerians must stop committing a crime. A source said: “It was also alleged that the recent killing of three Nigerians, was actually by Nigerians.

They were cult killings. A cult member killed another, and there was retaliation. It was getting messier.”Speaking on ways to curtail killings of Nigerians, Dabiri-Erewa said: “South Africa should make efforts to arrest the criminals who are giving Nigerians a bad name.”  (New Telegraph)

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SAD: White South African Woman Tied To A Tree And Gang Raped By Three Men |RN

Raped-white-woman

 

A woman from Bloemfontein was tied to a tree and three men took turns to rape her, said the Free State police.

Const. Peter Kareli, the police spokesman, said on Wednesday the 24-year-old woman went on her way to her sister’s school along the N8 when she was stopped by three men The men threatened her with a knife and dragged her into nearby fields.

The men allegedly assaulted her after they took off her clothes and gang-raped her. A passerby apparently saw what happened and called the police. Two of the men had already fled when the police arrived on the scene. The other man was caught red-handed, where he was busy raping the woman.

The victim was tied naked to a tree and had bruises all over her body,” said Kareli. The suspect tried to flee and crept into a stormwater drain. Police officers chased him and arrested him. The other two suspects were arrested on Thursday.

The suspects will soon appear in the Bloemfontein Magistrate’s Court.  (Online Point)

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(Video) Huge Crowds Turn Out For Winnie Madikizela Mandela’s Funeral |RN

Jason Burke Africa correspondent in Soweto
(Provided by Storyful)
Tens of thousands of South Africans filled a stadium in Soweto on Saturday for the funeral service of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, a hero of the anti-apartheid struggle but also one of its most controversial figures.

Shouts of “Long live Comrade Winnie” rang out around the stadium, at the beginning of a powerful and emotional service featuring prayers, tributes and the anthems that sustained those fighting for freedom in South Africa through decades of brutal repression against the racist regime.

Cyril Ramaphosa, who has been president since February, sat next to the two daughters of Madikizela-Mandela and Nelson Mandela, the Nobel prize winner and former president. Representatives from African states and political parties joined many of South Africa’s best-known political and cultural figures to pay tribute.

South African military personnel bring in the coffin at Orlando Stadium in Soweto for the funeral ceremony of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela.© AFP/Getty Images South African military personnel bring in the coffin at Orlando Stadium in Soweto for the funeral ceremony of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela.

The funeral is the highest level that South Africa accords for someone who was not head of state.

Madikizela-Mandela, who was married to Mandela for more than 30 years, had a sometimes negative image abroad that contrasted with a deep and long-lasting popularity in her homeland.

In a tribute at the funeral, her sister Zukiswa Madikizela said “Mam Winnie” was “fearless, courageous and loving”, and proof that women are capable of being revolutionaries and leaders.

Swati Dlamini-Mandela, a granddaughter, said Madikizela-Mandela was “ a proud black African woman who fought for …. the emancipation of her people”.

The stadium is situated little more than a mile from the streets where Madikizela-Mandela lived during the darkest days of apartheid and where she lived until her death.

Thousands have signed a condolence book outside her home on a modest street in the Orlando West neighbourhood. “This is history happening. I couldn’t miss this. I am from Soweto so this is very important to me. I am very proud of her,” said Aloma Thomo, 40.

An African National Congress (ANC) supporter arrives at a memorial service for Winnie Madikizela-Mandela at Orlando Stadium in Johannesburg's Soweto township, South Africa April 11, 2018. Memorials for Winnie Mandela Memorials for Winnie Mandela (Provided by Reuters)

Madikizela-Mandela’s remains will be buried in a cemetery in the north of Johannesburg on Saturday afternoon. Her death has prompted a fierce debate within South Africa between her many admirers and a smaller number of detractors.

Born in the poor Eastern Cape province, Madikizela-Mandela’s childhood was “a blistering inferno of racial hatred”, in the words of British biographer Emma Gilbey.

The young hospital social worker married Mandela shortly before the ANC leader was sentenced to life imprisonment for treason in 1962. During her husband’s 27-year incarceration, Madikizela-Mandela campaigned tirelessly for his release and for the rights of black South Africans, establishing a large personal following.

Tortured and subjected to repeated house arrest, she was kept under surveillance and, in 1977, banished to a remote town in another province.

Madikizela-Mandela said the experience of more than a year in solitary confinement changed her. “What brutalised me so much was that I knew what it is to hate,” she said.

The flag draped coffin carrying the remains of anti-apartheid icon Winnie Madikizela-Mandela arrives for the funeral ceremony in Soweto, South Africa's Orlando stadium Saturday, April 14, 2018. Madikizela-Mandela died April 2, 2018, at the age of 81. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)© AP The flag-draped coffin carrying the remains of anti-apartheid icon Winnie Madikizela-Mandela arrives for the funeral ceremony in Soweto, South Africa’s Orlando stadium Saturday, April 14, 2018…

As the violence of the apartheid authorities reached new intensity, Madikizela-Mandela was drawn into a world of internecine betrayal, reprisals and atrocity. Most notoriously, Madikizela-Mandela was found guilty of ordering the kidnapping of a 14-year-old boy, Stompie Seipei, also known as Stompie Moeketsi, who was beaten and killed by members of her personal bodyguard in 1989.

Within a year, she gave the clenched-fist salute of black power as she walked hand-in-hand with Mandela out of Cape Town’s Victor Verster prison on 11 February 1990.

The end of apartheid marked the start of a string of legal and political troubles. Appearing at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission set up to account for atrocities committed by both sides in the anti-apartheid struggle, Madikizela-Mandela refused to show remorse for abductions and murders carried out in her name.

Madikizela-Mandela separated from her husband in 1992. She was sacked from her ministerial post in 1995 after allegations of corruption and the couple divorced a year later. But her popular appeal remained strong.

FILE - In this Tuesday, Dec. 10, 2013 file photo Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, Nelson Mandela's former wife, listens to speakers during the memorial service for former South African president Nelson Mandela at the FNB Stadium in Soweto near Johannesburg. South African state broadcaster SABC said Monday April 2, 2018, that anti-apartheid activist Winnie Madikizela-Mandela has died. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)© AP FILE-In this Tuesday, Dec. 10, 2013 file photo Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, Nelson Mandela’s former wife, listens to speakers during the memorial service for former South African president Nelson Mandela…

In Soweto she was deeply involved in the community, always finding time to help those in need, neighbours said. “Her doors were open to everybody,” said Angela Msimang, 32, who lived nearby.

At a memorial service in New York on Friday, UN secretary general António Guterres described Madikizela-Mandela as “a strong and fearless woman. She had to fight patriarchy’s definitions of womanhood.”

South African military personnel bring in the coffin at Orlando Stadium in Soweto for the funeral ceremony of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela.

A new memorial outside her Soweto home bears the legend: “‘I am the product of the masses, of my country and the product of my enemy’, 1996, Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, Rest in Peace, Mother of the Nation.”   (The Guardian)

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Belgian Student Association Protest Against Farm Murders In South Africa (Video) |RN

by Denis Bolosky

Farm-murders-in-South-Africa

Members of the Belgian Nationalist Student Association have organized a rally in Ghent against what they call the genocide of white farmers in South Africa. Over the past few years, there’s been an increase in murders and attacks on farmers, although neither the authorities nor mainstream media have viewed these attacks as being racially-motivated.

The march was attended by South African students and politicians, who arrived in Belgium to share the problems of their community with Belgians – citizens of the country, which many members of the South African Boer minority consider the land of their forefathers. Sputnik sat down with Pieter Groenewald – the leader of South Africa’s conservative Freedom Front Plus to talk about these issues.

Sputnik: As a representative of the Boer minority in South Africa, do you feel support from Belgians?

Pieter Groenewald: The people in South Africa, they feel in a certain sense that they sometimes stand alone. And events like this – especially when it comes to farm murders, is really big moral support for the people of South Africa, specifically for the farmers, who know that there are other people, specifically in Belgium, that also support them in trying to get the government to realize that farm murders in South Africa, and the brutality is totally unacceptable – not only in South Africa, but also all over the world, and specifically in Belgium.

 

Sputnik: Is there any reaction to farm murders from the government and mass media in South Africa?

Pieter Groenewald: They are quite aware of the problem. But the government of today, they only see it as normal criminality. They don’t want to see it as a specific crime, as far as the farmers are concerned, and I say it is not normal criminality, because, I mean, it cannot be just normal criminality if the perpetrators come at 9 o’clock in the morning, the farmer and his wife went to church, they, visit their friends, and when they return at 3 o’clock – they kill them. It is not just normal criminality, if they torture the victims, using electric drills, drilling through women’s legs and feet, and also if they rape the women. So, it is not normal criminality. We say that there is a political element, and it is also linked to the land, because the land issue in South Africa is becoming more prominent, and it is central for our general election next year – 2019.

Sputnik: What are the ways to deal with this problem? Is there a political solution?

Pieter Groenewald: Well, first, what has to be done is, political leaders in South Africa must stop saying that the land in South Africa has been stolen by white people. By that, they are creating a specific climate, where the masses and the majority of black people think that we are a group of thieves just because we’re white. Even president Zuma in 2016 said at the anniversary of the governing party that “you, you – masses are poor because you don’t have land, and you are unemployed because you don’t have land, and there is inequality in South Africa because you don’t have land, and we know who has stolen the land.” – I mean, you’re creating an atmosphere. So, political leaders must lead in a responsible way, to say that “we cannot allow them to say that white people are actually criminals,” because if you say that they have stolen the land, you’re actually calling them criminals. Secondly, the government must realize that these crimes against the farmers are not a normal crime, it’s not normal criminality, as I said. And we say that they should come forward with specialized units to combat these specific crimes in the rural areas because you need special units who understand what’s happening as far as the farmer is concerned, and if you do these three things – it will improve the situation.

 

Sputnik: South Africa is hosting the BRICS summit this summer. Do you see such events as a chance to attract international attention to the problems of the country’s minorities? 

Pieter Groenewald: I appeal to the world: please, also raise your voice against this atrocity which is actually taking place in South Africa regarding farm murders. By doing that you’re putting pressure on the South African government. And even the government hears from all over the world “listen, we’re not going to invest in South Africa because you don’t intend to do anything as far as farm murders are concerned.” By doing that they would start forcing the South African government to, for instance, understand that it’s not a normal crime, and to stop all the hate speech, because, that’s nothing else but hate speech by political leaders.   (Sputnik)

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FF+, AfriForum, DA Colluding Against Land Expropriation – Julius Malema |RN

Picture via: The Citizen Newspaper

               Picture via: The Citizen Newspaper

The EFF wants the government to be the primary custodian of all of the country’s land.

The Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) on Thursday claimed there was a deliberate counter movement forming in the country against parliament’s resolution to amend the constitution so as to allow for the expropriation of land without compensation.

“This movement brings together right-wing formations like Freedom Front Plus, AfriForum, and liberal, market-friendly formations like the DA and Cope,” EFF leader Julius Malema said at a media briefing in Johannesburg.

“We are also aware that there are European members of parliament who are trying to mobilise Europe into an imperialist neocolonial programme of undermining the sovereignty and democratic rights of South Africans,” he added.

Malema also accused the media of being party to the conspiracy after the EFF’s motion – supported by the ANC and smaller parties – to expropriate land without compensation in the National Assembly was successfully passed last month by 241 votes to 83.

The matter has been referred to the Constitutional Review Committee in parliament, which has been tasked with initiating a public participation process. The committee is expected to report back to the House on August 30.

The EFF wants the government to be the primary custodian of all of the country’s land and to start a process of equal distribution with a principle of “use it or lose it”.

Malema urged citizens to make their views known on land reform to the Constitutional Review Committee.

“[We] encourage all to stop the threats of war or civil conflict. Parliament has opened up space for engagement and we believe that all South Africans should democratically participate and be willing to accept the democratic outcome of the engagement.”

The firebrand leader said the EFF was also open to engagements with Zulu King Goodwill Zwelithini and other stakeholders on the Ingonyama Trust. The king has called on all Zulus to donate R5 each towards a legal bid to challenge recommendations made by a high-level parliamentary panel to dissolve the trust established in 1994.

King Zwelithini is legally the sole trustee of the Ingonyama Trust, which administers 2.8 million hectares of land on his behalf.

“Whilst the parliamentary process is ongoing, the EFF is willing to meet and engage with sensible and interested parties on the land question. We are particularly willing to meet and engage with King Goodwill Zwelithini, Ingonyama Trust, and all traditional leadership establishments and bodies that have an interest on the constitutional and policy issues that relate to land ownership, control and redistribution,” Malema said.

 

https://citizen.co.za/news/south-africa/1849331/da-takes-dd-mabuza-to-task-over-cabinet-ministers-bunking-parliament/embed/#?secret=tCiTpBgE3F

(The Citizen)

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“This Is Not About Land, It’s About Driving White Farmers Into Extinction – Katie Hopkins

Boer-Afrikaner-farm-murders

White farm murders in South Africa

 

South Africa is a land wrought with heartache.

Vengeance for the Apartheid-era has culminated in an epidemic of reverse racism, farm attacks and murders, and if that were not enough, a new constitutional amendment calling for “land expropriation without compensation.”

That’s a lot of syllables to say:

We are going to take your land and without permission.

The amendment is being pushed by African National Congress (ANC) head Cyril Ramaphosa. The Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) will heed this not so subtle call from the ANC to step up their already blood-thirsty demonstrations, in which they chant:

“Kill the Boer, Kill the white farmer.”

Having spent time with the victims of farm attacks, I can tell you that the torture they and their children have endured is real, and bears lasting scars.

 

Make no mistake, “land expropriation without compensation” means that black gangs — the ones currently carrying out brutal farm attacks — now have political permission to carry out murder and torture.   (RebelSouthAfrica.com)

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