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Samsung Set To Unveil A Foldable Smartphone This Year (VIDEO) |RN

 

Samsung will unveil a foldable smartphone later this year, the CEO of its mobile division told CNBC, amid rumors that such a device was in the works.

DJ Koh said that “it’s time to deliver” on a foldable device after consumer surveys carried out by Samsung showed that there is a market for that kind of handset.

Speaking to CNBC, Koh ran through the design thinking of the upcoming smartphone, particularly how Samsung is trying to differentiate the experience from a tablet once it is unfolded.

“You can use most of the uses … on foldable status. But when you need to browse or see something, then you may need to unfold it. But even unfolded, what kind of benefit does that give compared to the tablet? If the unfolded experience is the same as the tablet, why would they (consumers) buy it?,” Koh said at the IFA electronics show in Berlin last week.

Samsung Unveils New Galaxy Note Smart Phone   © Provided by CNBC Samsung Unveils New Galaxy Note Smart Phone  

 

“So every device, every feature, every innovation should have a meaningful message to our end customer. So when the end customer uses it, (they think) ‘wow, this is the reason Samsung made it’.”

Koh said the device could be unveiled this year at the Samsung Developer Conference in November in San Francisco. The mobile CEO admitted that while the development process is “complicated,” the company has “nearly concluded” it.

The move comes as Samsung looks to reinvigorate growth in its mobile division which saw sales fall 20 percent year-on-year in the second quarter of 2018. The South Korean technology giant is facing stiff competition from Apple and Huawei in the high-end of the market. A folding phone could differentiate it from its competitors and potentially allow it to charge a higher price for the unique device.

Koh also told CNBC that the company is changing its strategy in the mid-tier smartphone market to pack lower priced devices with new technology in order to appeal more to millennials.

CNBC

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Mobile Phone Use After 10pm Increases Chances Of Depression, Loneliness – Study

a person sitting in a chair talking on a cell phone    © Provided by Independent Digital News & Media Limited  

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It’s no secret that using your phone at before bed isn’t really conducive to a good night’s sleep.

However, now a study of more than 91,000 people has found that scrolling through your Instagram and Twitter feeds from the comfort of your pillow in the wee hours could increase the likelihood of developing a number of psychological problems such as depression, bipolar disorder and neuroticism.

Late night phone-usage is just one of the disruptive behaviours pointed out by the researchers, who attributed the links to the aforementioned symptoms to body clock disturbance.

Previous research has shown the detrimental effects of interruptions to the body’s natural 24-hour cycle of the body – known as the circadian rhythm – as the result of shift work that requires employees to work through the night.

However, this study, published in The Lancet Psychiatry by professors at The University of Glasgow, is the first to monitor body clock disruption on such a large scale.

Participants aged 37 to 73 had their activity levels monitored by wrist-work accelerometers, which they wore for a seven day period, enabling researchers to measure the extent at which their circadian rhythmicity was disturbed during this time.

However, there were caveats to the findings, given that participants were only monitored for a week and were exclusively middle-aged and above.

The researchers also conducted cross-sectional examinations to measure participants’ psychological well-being and found that roughly one in 25 had unusual activity habits whereby they weren’t that much more active during the day than the night.

These people were 11 per cent more likely to have bipolar disorder and six per cent more likely to be battling depression, they found.

Plus, they also reported lower happiness levels and greater rates of loneliness.

Such people suffer from “very poor sleep hygiene”, said lead author Daniel Smith of the University of Glasgow and would engage in late night activities such as playing on their mobile phones or making cups of tea.

The figures may seem small, however, Smith added they are no less significant:

“This is important because it seems to be across the board,” he said, “so it is a very consistent finding for these negative mental health and cognitive outcomes.”

While Smith advocated imposing a 10pm limit to phone usage to help combat this, he added that daytime activities have a part to play too, explaining that a healthy sleep pattern is often the result of being active during the day and inactive at night.

“I think this is important as a population health issue because so many of us are living with disrupted circadian rhythms,” he said.

“It’s unlikely that the way society is currently set up is good for your health. So many people are living in city environments flooded with light 24/7.”

(Independent)

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WhatsApp To Stop Working On Blackberry, Others Running On Window 8 On 1 Jan 2018

Aatif Sulleyman
a close up of a logo        © Provided by Independent Digital News & Media Limited

 

 

WhatsApp will stop working on a selection of smartphones and mobile platforms in the new year.

From 1 January 2018, the messenger service won’t be available on any handsets running Windows Phone 8.0 (or older versions of the operating system), BlackBerry OS or BlackBerry 10.

The company made the announcement in an update to a blog post that was originally published in February 2016.

“When we started WhatsApp in 2009, people’s use of mobile devices looked very different from today. The Apple App Store was only a few months old. About 70 percent of smartphones sold at the time had operating systems offered by BlackBerry and Nokia,” it reads.

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“Mobile operating systems offered by Google, Apple and Microsoft – which account for 99.5 percent of sales today – were on less than 25 percent of mobile devices sold at the time.”

The platforms that are being cut are unpopular, and have been for some time. The company ended support for Nokia Symbian S60 devices in June.

It is also planning to cut support for Nokia S40 devices on 31 December 2018 and phones running Android versions 2.3.7 and older on 1 February 2020.

Although these platforms are still supported, WhatsApp is no longer actively developing for them, which means some features could stop functioning at any moment.

“While these mobile devices have been an important part of our story, they don’t offer the kind of capabilities we need to expand our app’s features in the future,” the company’s blog post said..

“This was a tough decision for us to make, but the right one in order to give people better ways to keep in touch with friends, family, and loved ones using WhatsApp.

“If you use one of these affected mobile devices, we recommend upgrading to a newer Android, iPhone, or Windows Phone.”   (The Independent)

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