Image

Ex-President Zuma, 76 To Marry Lady, 24, As Seventh Wife |The Republican News

Jacob-Zuma'-Nonkanyiso-Conco
                     Zuma’s bride, Nonkanyiso Conco

Seventy-six-year-old former president of South Africa, Jacob Zuma, is set to marry for the seventh time.

His bride-to-be is 24-year-old Nonkanyiso Conco, who confirmed to TimesLIVE that she and the embattled former president are set to wed.

“Yes‚ we are getting married‚ but that is all I can say. I need to consult before I give any interviews‚” she told the South African website.

Conco is a director of the Pietermaritzburg-based Nomkhubulwane Culture and Youth Development Organisation‚ aimed at protecting the cultural practices of young Zulu women.

Conco reportedly resides in the plush Ballito Estate Hilltop‚ home to some of the city’s most well-heeled residents. She would be Zuma’s youngest bride‚ at 52 years his junior.

Zuma‚ who has always been a proponent of polygamy‚ is currently married to Gertrude Sizakele Khumalo‚ Thobeka Madiba-Zuma and Bongi Ngema-Zuma.

He is divorced from Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma and separated from Nompumelelo MaNtuli Zuma.  (Punch)

http://www.twitter.com/RNNetwork1

Continue reading

Advertisements
Image

New South African President, Ramaphosa, Vows To Fight Corruption |RN

• Pledges not to disappoint citizens

South Africa’s new president yesterday pledged to tackle endemic corruption and supervise mismanagement in state-owned enterprises

Cyril Ramaphosa, 65,  also promised to work hard “not to disappoint the people of South Africa.” He was elected president in a parliamentary vote yesterday after the resignation of scandal-ridden Jacob Zuma, 75,  on orders from the ruling African National Congress (ANC).

Ramaphosa will serve out the remainder of Zuma’s term until 2019 elections. Seen as an ally of Zuma, Ramaphosa was appointed deputy president in 2014. Zuma resigned on Wednesday after years of scandals that damaged the stature of the ruling African National Congress party.

Chief Justice Mogoeng Mogoeng presided over the swearing-in ceremony at the presidential office in Cape Town. Mogoeng congratulated Ramaphosa and shook his hand as onlookers applauded. Mogoeng had earlier read out the former president’s resignation letter.

Opposition leaders, however, said the ruling party protected Zuma for years despite scandals and would be unable to effectively root out corruption within its own ranks. Ramaphosa also said one of the first things he wants to do is have a meeting with the leaders of other political parties “so we can try and find a way of working together.” He said he will outline his policies in a state of the nation address tomorrow evening.

Ramaphosa was the only candidate nominated for election in the parliament after opposition parties said they would not participate. ANC has a majority in the 400-member parliament The opposition instead unsuccessfully called for the dissolution of the National Assembly and early elections. They said ANC party plan to elect a new president was “illegitimate.”

The Democratic Alliance said that the parliament should be dissolved and new national elections should be held because the ruling party-dominated assembly failed to hold Zuma to account for alleged corruption. Julius Malema, leader of the Economic Freedom Fighters party (EFFP) has made a similar statement.

Zuma said in a 30-minute farewell address to the nation he disagreed with the way the ANC had thrust him toward an early exit after Ramaphosa replaced him as party president, but would accept its orders. Observers said Zuma’s departure late on Wednesday provided evidence of the strength of South Africa’s democratic institutions, from the courts to the media and the constitution.

Zuma, a former member of the ANC’s military wing in the days of apartheid, rose through the ranks of the party to become president. He led the country for more than a third of its time after apartheid.

“Defiant in defeat” and “Going, Going, Gone” were among the newspaper headlines that captured Zuma’s unwillingness to leave. “South Africa’s long nightmare is over,” read the headline from online political news website Daily Maverick. The EFF, which has six percent of the seats in parliament, had sponsored a no-confidence motion in Zuma that would have gone ahead yesterday had Zuma not jumped.

The rand, which has gained ground whenever Zuma ran into political turbulence, soared to a near three-year high against the dollar on word of his resignation. South Africa’s main stock market index jumped nearly 4 percent and headed for its biggest one-day gain in more than two years as investors hailed Zuma’s exit after nine years in office rife with allegations of sleaze and mismanagement.

Ratings agency Moody’s said it was closely monitoring developments in South Africa, focusing on the policy implications of Zuma’s political demise.

The S&P Global agency said South Africa’s sovereign credit ratings and outlook will not be immediately affected by the change of the country’s leadership.

…Faces uphill task

President Cyril Ramaphosa raised the hope of South Africans when he vowed to steer the country from the turmoil that has hurt the economy and briefly sent it into recession last year.

However he faces an uphill task in three areas: Corruption has ruptured the economic structures of the country with both local and foreign investors losing confidence in the system; the 2019 general elections poses another major challenge with a divided ANC which lost key municipalities including Johannesburg and the capital, Pretoria in 2016; youth restiveness and xenophobia attacks on non South Africans is yet another challenge he may have inherited from the Zuma administration.

He knows this. He has said, he will be “walking a tightrope, balancing the competing priorities of holding his party together while avoiding economic disaster.” But how he intends to bring the turn around is what South Africans and indeed the world is eagerly waiting to see.

Ramaphosa-sworn-in

“Cyril Ramaphosa inherits an alarming mess from Jacob Zuma,” said Ben Payton, head of Africa research for Verisk Maplecroft told reporters. Restoring confidence in the troubled mining sector, ending the corruption around state-owned enterprises and winning over Zuma’s supporters within the ANC should be among his top priorities, Payton said.      (The Sun)

http://www.twitter.com/RNNetwork1

Continue reading

Image

South Africa: ANC Resolved To Remove Zuma As President |The Republican News

Jacob-Zuma                                                  President Jacob Zuma

South Africa’s ruling ANC party resolved Tuesday to oust scandal-tainted President Jacob Zuma from office after he refused to resign, local media reported following marathon closed-door talks.

The party’s powerful 107-member national executive committee (NEC) met for 13 hours at a hotel outside Pretoria, and decided it would “recall” Zuma from his post, several local media outlets said.

“It took a brutal 13 hours, but the ANC’s national executive committee has decided to recall President Jacob Zuma as head of state,” the Times Live news website said, citing unnamed sources in the talks.

Related: Date Scheduled For Motion Of No Confidence In President Jacob Zuma

Other media reported that the party would write to Zuma ordering him to stand down as president, after his request for a few more months in office was rejected.

State broadcaster SABC said the ANC had given Zuma 48 hours to turn in his resignation.

ANC officials were not reachable to confirm the reports, but the party called a press conference for 12:00 pm (1000 GMT) at its headquarters in Johannesburg.

The ANC can “recall” the head of state, essentially forcing him to step down, but the process is a party-level instruction and he is under no constitutional obligation to obey.

If he refuses, he would then likely be ousted via a parliamentary vote of no-confidence within days.

As the dramatic power struggle built to a climax, African National Congress chief Cyril Ramaphosa reportedly left the all-night meeting for a face-to-face conversation with Zuma at his official Pretoria residence.

Ramaphosa’s motorcade was seen returning to the meeting at midnight. Three hours later, the talks closed.

Ramaphosa, the de-facto president-in-waiting, has been in deadlocked negotiations with Zuma, who dismissed an earlier request from party leaders to step down more than a week ago.

The stalemate around Zuma’s future plunged South Africa into political uncertainty over who is running the country, with a series of public events cancelled including last Thursday’s annual State of the Nation address to parliament.

– ‘Want closure’ –

“We know you want this matter to be finalised,” Ramaphosa, 65, told a party rally in Cape Town on Sunday to rapturous cheering.

“We know you want closure… Because our people want this matter to be finalised, the NEC will be doing precisely that.”

South African opposition parties on Monday called for early elections as the ANC’s leadership battle ground on.

“We must proceed to the dissolution of parliament… subsequent to that, we move on to an early election,” Democratic Alliance (DA) party leader Mmusi Maimane told reporters, speaking alongside several opposition parties.

The parliamentary speaker announced that an opposition request for a no-confidence vote against Zuma on Tuesday was still being considered.

Zuma’s presidency has been marred by corruption scandals, slow economic growth and record unemployment that have fuelled public anger.

He was scheduled to stand down next year after serving the maximum two terms after coming to power in 2009.

Related: BREAKING: South Africa’s Credit Rating Downgraded, Yield On Gov’t Bond Up

Zuma’s hold over the ANC was shaken in December when his chosen successor — his former wife Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma — narrowly lost to Ramaphosa in a vote to be the new party leader.

The ANC has insisted there will be no delay to the budget speech, which is due on February 21.

Sunday’s rally was part of ANC celebrations marking 100 years since Nelson Mandela’s birth — as well as efforts by Ramaphosa to revive the party’s tainted reputation ahead of next year’s general election.

Zuma, 75, has not spoken publicly since February 4 when he was first asked by the party top leadership to step down.

In 2008, his supporters pushed out then-president Thabo Mbeki over allegations of abuse of power.

Under Zuma, the ANC won less than 54 percent of the vote in local elections in 2016 — its worst electoral performance since coming to power with Mandela at the helm in 1994.

Ramaphosa is a former trade unionist who led talks to end apartheid rule in the early 1990s and then became a multi-millionaire businessman before returning to politics.

AFP

http://www.twitter.com/RNNetwork1

Continue reading

Image

Johannesburg South Townships Mobilise For Massive Protest On Friday

Protests over lack of housing continues in the south of Johannesburg despite government’s promise to residents that the plan will provided within two weeks.

The protests started in Eldorado Park on Monday and quickly spread to other neighboring areas, Ennerdale, Klipspruit, Finetown and Orange Farm.

According to EWN reporter, Mia Lindeque, Ennerdale residents say they do not want to speak to any government official.

The schooling has also been suspended for the past three days in Ennerdale and Eldorado Park.

 

EWN reports seeing a notice circulating in these communities inviting residents to join a massive protest on Friday.

Yesterday Police Minister Fikile Mbalula said these protests are led by drug kingpins and peddler.

Municipal IQ economist, Karen Heese, says though protests may provide an opportunity for criminal activity, they are are not planned by criminals.

 

Continue reading

Image

Date Scheduled For Motion Of No Confidence In President Jacob Zuma

by SAPeople

PRETORIA – Parliament has announced that the motion of no confidence will be scheduled for debate in the National Assembly on Tuesday, 18 April 2017, at 2pm.

Parliament, Cape Town, 2015. Source: GCIS

On 3 April 2017, the Speaker of the National Assembly Baleka Mbete confirmed the receipt of several letters from parliamentary political parties requesting an urgent scheduling of a motion of no confidence in President Jacob Zuma (in terms of Section 102 of the Constitution)… following his much-expected, but still controversial, late night Cabinet Reshuffle, which included – without consulting other top ANC members – the firing of Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan and his Deputy, Mcebisi Jonas (whose resignation as an ANC MP was announced today).

As per the National Assembly rules – Mbete engaged in a consultation process with Cyril Ramaphosa and Jackson Mthembu before today’s announcement.

“The Rules enjoin the Speaker to consult with the Leader of Government Business, who is the Deputy President of the Republic, and the Chief Whip of the Majority Party in her consideration of such Motion,” Parliament said in a statement on Wednesday.

The Assembly Rules direct that such a Motion must be scheduled within a reasonable time given the programme of the Assembly. The urgency of the matter was taken into consideration in scheduling a date, as well as the fact that Members of Parliament are currently working in their constituencies across the country.

Parliament said the parties concerned will be contacted accordingly. – SAnews.gov.za

Anti Zuma  protests in South Africa and Zuma must fall protests

http://www.twitter.com/RNNetwork1

Continue reading

Image

Jacob Zuma Refuses To Accept Memo From Anti-xenophobia Protest Group

South Africans and immigrants march together to Union Buildings

Photo of anti-xenophobia protest
About 300 people marched to the Union Buildings on Thursday. Photo: Ihsaan Haffejee
By Ihsaan Haffejee

Leaders of the Coalition of Civics Against Xenophobia have accused the South African government of bias and hypocrisy after the office of the Presidency refused to accept their memorandum upon their arrival at the Union Buildings.

On Thursday, a group of about 300 demonstrators consisting of citizens of other African countries, immigrants and people born in South Africa made their way from Burgers Park to the Union Buildings where protest leaders wanted to hand over a memorandum of demands.

A large police contingent watched over the protesters from behind the fence that separates the park from the Union Building entrance. Police informed protest leaders that no one from the Office of the Presidency was willing to accept the memorandum.

“This is a national crisis where in the past people have lost their lives, where people’s livelihoods have been destroyed. And for the South African government to refuse to accept our memorandum indicates to us that they are not a caring government. It shows us as foreigners exactly what the South African government thinks of us and it shows their lack of commitment to tackle this sensitive issue,” said Essie-Prince Mpinda a leader representing the Congolese community.

Earlier in the day, Themba Ncalo, the chairperson of the Coalition of Civics Against Xenophobia, said that the coalition is made up of South Africans as well as people from a number of countries. “Our main aim today will be to march to the Union Buildings and deliver our memorandum. We are going to show that South Africa is not a country which promotes xenophobia,” said Ncalo.

The organisers of the march also accused authorities of a lack of co-operation with the march organisers, after the protest was denied permission by metro police.

“It’s strange that a few weeks ago permission was granted to a group promoting violence and xenophobia, and now that we wish to stage a peaceful demonstration we are denied,” said Ncalo.

Despite not getting the relevant permission the march went ahead and was escorted by a contingent of SAPS members on foot and in police vehicles.

Ahmed Abdi, from Somali, who was in Pretoria West when violence broke out in a Somali neighbourhood during the anti-immigrant protest a few weeks ago, joined today’s protest with the aim of countering the anti-immigrant sentiment in his neighbourhood. He said that some Somalis have returned to their spaza shops in the townships after vacating them following the violence, but they are living in a constant state of fear and uncertainty.

Ali Tarar, the vice-president of the Pakistan South Africa Association, wanted to remind people who were looting shops and attacking owners that they were destroying families. “We are saying that when a shop is looted it is not just the owner who is affected. That man is supporting an entire family and in some cases two families. With this looting they have lost everything, including the ability to provide for their families,” he said.

Wrapped in the bright blue flag of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Mpinda appealed to the South African government to stop denying that xenophobia is a pressing issue which needs to be adequately handled. “You cannot paint an entire community with the same brush. If people are involved in crime, we urge the authorities to arrest these people,” said Prince Mpinda. “A lot of the Congolese in South Africa have fled the country because they are in opposition to the Kabila government and as such are fleeing violence and death. For them to seek safety here and still experience this xenophobia is truly regrettable. We are now a no-land people. We cannot return home and we are not wanted here.”

Metro police spokesperson Isaac Mahamba said a march to the Union Buildings needed security cluster approval and a letter from the presidency to say who will accept the memorandum. He said the protesters did not have this letter so permission was not granted.

The Presidency has not yet responded to a request for comment.

Source: GrounUp

http://www.twitter.com/RNNetwork1

Continue reading

Image

Xenophobic Attacks: Nigerians Vow To Stay Put In South Africa

 

…as foreigners confront anti-immigrant protesters in Pretoria

Gbenro Adeoye, Jesusegun Alagbe and Eric Dumo  with agency report

Despite repeated xenophobic attacks, some Nigerians in South Africa have said they would not return home.

Citing unemployment, insecurity, kidnappings, poor infrastructure and epileptic power supply, the Nigerians described returning to the country as returning to a “hardship zone.”

Some others said it would be difficult to leave South Africa as they had nothing to fall back on in Nigeria.

There are over 800,000 Nigerians living in South Africa, according to the Nigerian Union South Africa, with many of them based in Johannesburg.

However, those living in Pretoria, South Africa’s administrative capital, have in recent days witnessed violence reminiscent of the last major wave of xenophobic attacks that hit Johannesburg and Durban in 2015, in which about seven Nigerians died.

In the recent attacks which started early February 2017, at least 20 shops and homes — belonging to foreigners, mostly Nigerians — were looted and burned, as stated by the South African police.

In spite of the attacks, a Nigerian living in Pretoria, Muyiwa Adebola, said he would not return home.

Having worked as an auto-mechanic in the South African city for about five years, he said it would be “unwise” to leave now.

“This is where I have my source of livelihood. This is where I have been working for the past five years to take care of my family in Nigeria. I cannot leave now because of the attacks,” the 38-year-old said.

Making reference to unemployment, poor infrastructure, among others, Adebola said the only reason he would return to Nigeria is if things were working properly.

He said, “They have good roads here, potable water, constant power supply and you don’t often hear of kidnapping. As an auto mechanic, I’m also better paid here than when I was in Nigeria.

“Personally, I’m not deterred by the attacks, even though it’s worrying. I know things would calm down again and we could carry on with our normal businesses.”

Seun Komolafe, who has lived in the former apartheid colony for about nine years, said the reason for the attacks is that “South Africans see Nigerians as a threat to their survival because of our hardworking nature.”

He said, “The reason why many of us have decided to remain in South Africa is because things have yet to work properly in Nigeria. Getting a job with your academic qualification is easier here than in Nigeria.

“Over the last few days, I have spoken to many of our people here who would have loved to come back to Nigeria but can’t do so yet because they don’t know what to survive on if they return.

“The people here are very hostile to Nigerians. They see us as a threat in every way because we are hardworking and considerate to the feelings of others, while many of them are lazy and selfish.”

Meanwhile, Komolafe said he would love to return to Nigeria only if there were job opportunities.

Mr Gabriel Eze, a resident of Johannesburg for 10 years, is a luxury store owner in the city. Eze said since he had invested all his life in the business, it would be foolish to leave now.

He said, “My family is here, so there’s nothing to come and do at home. Where you succeed is where you call home. I was struggling in Nigeria before I came here in 2007.

“If you think of the attacks, you would do nothing. I have insured my business. So if anything happens, I’ll not be too sad. I may only think of returning to Nigeria if there is no kidnapping, epileptic power supply and poor infrastructure. To be sincere, these are the things that drove us out of Nigeria.”

Eze added that his interactions with fellow Nigerians in South Africa showed that many of them were not willing to come back to the country.

“Some of them have become established or they are about to, so it’s not easy to leave like that. I know of friends who have relocated from Pretoria to another county after the attacks. The hustle continues. To come home is like returning to a ‘hardship zone,’” he said.

Abdulrahman Abubakar, who has lived in Pretoria for 12 years, also cited poor infrastructure as a reason for not willing to return to Nigeria.

He said, “Some of us here were discussing in respect of the recent attacks. If there were infrastructural facilities in Nigeria, we would all come home. In fact, if it is only electricity that the government can fix, we will come. That’s why some of us came to South Africa.”

A Nigerian living in Johannesburg Central, Mr Ade Adesina, also said he was not planning on returning to Nigeria despite the xenophobic attacks.

He said, “The South African government has not asked us to leave so I will remain in the country.

“The things we take for granted here (in South Africa) are not in Nigeria. In Nigeria, such things as power supply, good infrastructure and so on are considered as a luxury, so what is there to return to?”

Also, in a conversation Saturday PUNCH had with the Public Relations Officer of NUSA, Mr Emeka Collins, he said that despite the attacks, most Nigerians were not willing to return to the country.

“My observation is that many Nigerians still want to remain in South Africa. Some of them are contented living here due to the hardship at home,” he said.

Collins said the Nigerian Consul General in South Africa, Ambassador (Mrs.) Uche Ajulu-Okeke, visited the victims of the latest attacks on Wednesday.

The Secretary General of NUSA, Mr Adetola Olubajo, also confirmed that “most” Nigerians he spoke with were not planning to return to Nigeria despite the attacks.

“The Consul General visited the police to report the attacks and I believe everything is normal now,” he said.

For Nigerians considering to return home but have no means of doing so, the Federal Government has asked them to contact the Nigerian High Commission in Johannesburg.

When asked whether the government would consider providing a free flight for them, the Senior Special Assistant to President Muhammadu Buhari on Foreign Affairs and Diaspora, Mrs Abike Dabiri-Erewa, said, “There is a procedure for that. Those willing to return home would have to go to the commission in Johannesburg to liaise with it first.”

Nigerians and other foreigners clashed with anti-immigrant protesters on Friday in Pretoria, South Africa.

A South African group called Mamelodi Concerned Residents, which led the anti-immigrant march, blamed foreign nationals, including Nigerians, for taking South African jobs and accused them of running prostitution rings and drugs.

The group had in recent weeks launched a series of attacks on migrants, particularly Nigerians, living in Pretoria.

However, Friday’s ‘xenophobic’ attacks were resisted by Nigerians and other foreigners, resulting into clashes between South Africans and foreigners, British Broadcasting Corporation reported.

Eyewitnesses reported that Nigerians were seen confronting their attackers with knives, sticks and guns.

During the anti-immigrant protest, there were reports of looting, violence and destruction of property belonging to foreigners.

A resident of Johannesburg, South Africa, via his twitter handle, @IdahPeterside, said, “It’s a stand-off in Pretoria. Nigerians have refused to hide. The South Africans are being confronted by Nigerians carrying guns.”

A Nigerian living in Pretoria, Mr Abdulraman Abubakar, confirmed the clashes to Saturday PUNCH.

He said, “There were clashes between South Africans and foreigners this morning in different parts of Pretoria. The police are firing rubber bullets as we speak.”

Meanwhile, the South African Police Force said on Friday that it had arrested over 136 people in Pretoria following an anti-immigrant protest which held in the city.

The South African National Police Chief, Khomotso Phahlane, said the protesters were arrested during operations that lasted for about 24 hours.

However, it was uncertain how many of those in custody were South Africans and how many were foreigners.

Be that as it may, Phahlane said anyone found to have been inciting violence would be prosecuted.

President Jacob Zuma had also condemned the acts of violence and intimidation directed at African immigrants living in the country.

“It is wrong to brandish all non-nationals as drug dealers or human traffickers. Let us isolate those who commit such crimes and work with the government to have them arrested, without stereotyping and causing harm to innocent people,” Zuma said in a statement.  (Punchng.com)

http://www.twitter.com/RNNetwork1

Continue reading