Image

China Begins Export Of Cocoa Beans Forcing African Exporters To Panic, Vying To Be Biggest Producer Of Yam |The Republican News


By  Elvis Adjetey

Cocoa beans are pictured in Ghana’s eastern cocoa town of Akim Akooko REUTERS/Kwasi Kpodo/File Photo.

Some Ghanaians are panicking over reports of the Chinese entry into the cocoa industry.

The Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences recently reported that the Chinese island of Hainan has exported cocoa beans to Belgium.

South China’s island province of Hainan was responsible for the exported cocoa beans.

The first batch of 500 kg of cocoa beans worth 3,044 euros (about $3,600), was produced in Xinglong, a township of Hainan with a tropical climate, China Daily reported.

“Cocoa is a raw material for making chocolate. With the increasing demand for chocolates, Hainan has been expanding its cocoa planting area and making breakthroughs in technological development,” said Hao Zhaoyun, a researcher with CATAS.

“As Belgium is dubbed ‘kingdom of chocolates,’ exports to the country indicate that our cocoa production standards have been recognized by the international community,” Hao added.

Panic in Ghana
Ghana’s COCOBOD, the agency that handles issues related to cocoa farming and export in Ghana is assessing the impact of the impact of cocoa beans by China.

Although COCOBOD appears concerned, it maintains that the quantity of the Chinese cocoa export is too small to affect Ghana as the second largest cocoa producer in the world.

But there are concerns about the impact on price of cocoa beans on the world market if there is no increase in production and consumption.

Ghana’s Agricultural Workers Union (GAWU) has cautioned the government not to panic but rather initiate steps to modernize agriculture to mitigate any impact.

According to the General Secretary of GAWU Edward Kareweh the government of Ghana must transform cultivation of cocoa, its harvesting and processing to generate more revenue from cocoa production.

“We have to immediately change how we produce cocoa in this country. For more than 100 years we have been using cutlasses and hoes on our cocoa farms.

If we look at how we even harvest and store the cocoa beans, it is also not the best. We must sit up looking at the capacity of China and what they can do when they enter a particular industry” he said.

A Ghanaian renowned businessman, Sam Jonah expressed worry at a public event saying “The Chinese having helped pollute our rivers through illegal mining activities and having, in connivance with some Ghanaians acquired large tracks of farmlands in the cocoa growing areas have started producing their own cocoa.”

On Social media many Africans are worried very soon, China could outdo the leading producers of Cocoa, all found in Africa.

Cocoa is mainly produced in tropical regions such as West Africa with Ghana and Ivory Coast the leading producers.

China has now exported cocoa to Europe. Apparently they have grown 2 billion trees over the last 6 years, using agronomists from Ghana, paying them $3800 or so per month.

Production of yam, garri

Meanwhile, China has also packaged garri like rice and exported to Europe. On the packages, the Chinese have boldly claimed in writing that “from cassava grown on uncontaminated soil”. This has psychological influence it places in minds of consumers out there and the financial damage this will do to the African exporters wanting to compete. African exports will be shunned outright very soon, if they do match the advertising war.

Thirdly, China have also turned her attention on the pona yam, which is indigenous to Brong-Ahafo and the Northern part of Ghana. According to the “leaked” document, it shows that China is vying to become the world’s biggest producer of yams in a matter of a few years – with pona as its “star” or most lucrative yam export.

Nigeria currently exports about 70% of the world’s yam market but not Pona. The problem here is China will again insinuate that our lands are all contaminated, and crush the African exporters. The Chinese are in Africa plotting to subjugate and finally eliminate Africans – because whoever is hungry and thirsty does not care about gold, land or property.

Food and water is next strategy in their war against Africa. That is, the first phase was the loans, followed by the contamination of the land with galamsay…. Look at Zambia and how the Chinese are ruining the land there extracting bauxite, or the Congo with the extraction of coltan, etc. It is not just in Ghana facing Galamsey or illegal mining by the Chinese, etc. Africans need to wake up the game is on, it is either they make it or perish…..one thing will happen.


Culled from Africafeeds.com

Continue reading
Image

“I Lost My Igbo Identity”, Igbo-Ghanaian, Gordon Chimso Seeks To Reconnect With Family In Aba |The Republican News

Igbo-Ghanaian seeking to reconnect with his Igbo root from Aba, Abia state: Mr Gordon Chimso

By The Republican News

This young man story is a heartbreaking one and a reminder of the usual narrative of the need to keep in contact with your root unless you have decided not to have anything to do with your root.

Also, it would be good for parents, especially the Igbo who are adventurous in nature that travel far and wide around the globe, to leave some kind of detailed note on how their offsprings could reconnect with family back home if anything happens to them.

The story of this man is obviously one out of many cases of this nature, where children born outside the shores even within the shores of Nigeria are unable to reconnect with their families.

His story is heartbreaking and is seen below:

Good morning Sir, please help me to post this in your group, perhaps God may use this group to reconnect me to my Igbo root.

My name is Gordon Chimson; I am an Igbo man, born and bred in Ghana. I am now a full grown man, with wife and children. Though, God has blessed me with many things but I am yet to see myself as a successful man, my main goal is to trace my Igbo root, unite and rehabitate with my kinsmen—that will be my greatest achievement in life.

My father’s name is NDA OKOROJI, from Aba-ngwa Abia state. He married a Ghanaian woman (my mother) and resided in Ghana (Efiakuma, Takorad. Western part of Ghana—where I was born.) My father died when I was a year and 6months old while my mother died when I was 2yrs old, leaving me under the care of my uneducated grandmother–who could not provide me with detail informations on how to trace my family in the Igbo land.

According to the story, my father was brought to Ghana by his uncle but left Ghana during the Aliens compliancee Order in 1969 after all his efforts to take us to Nigeria failed as it was not permitted by Ghanaians. Whenever I remembered about my lost of Igbo identity, I became downcasted, depressed and unhappy, it gives me sleepless nights, making me to feel lonely, forlorn, , rejected and dejected. I wish God will use someone from this group, to help me unite with my kinsmen in the Igbo land. Thank you all, as I await your comments; advice and suggestions on what to do, to reunite with my kinsmen.

Continue reading
Image

BREAKING NEWS: Jerry Rawlings, Former President of Ghana Is Dead |The Republican News

Rawlings Funeral 20201
Former president of Ghana, Mr. Jerry Rawlings

Former President Jerry John Rawlings is dead, The Republican News can authoritatively confirm.

The former president The Republican News understands passed on, today, November 12, 2020, after a brief illness.

According to state-owned Daily Graphic, the former President had been on admission at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital for about a week for an undisclosed ailment. He was 73.

It will be recalled that Mr Rawlings recently lost and buried his mother last month.

Jerry John Rawlings was born in Accra on 22nd June 1947, to a Ghanaian mother from Dzelukope, near Keta, in the Volta Region, and a Scottish father.

Background of Rawlings

Jerry John Rawlings was born in Accra on 22nd June 1947, to a Ghanaian mother from Dzelukope, near Keta, in the Volta Region, and a Scottish father.

He was educated at Achimota School where he obtained his General Certificate of Education ‘O’ Level in 1966.

He enlisted as a Flight Cadet in the Ghana Air Force in August 1967, and was subsequently selected for officer cadet training at the Ghana Military Academy and Training School, Teshie, in Accra.

In March 1968, he was posted to Takoradi in the Western Region to continue his course.

He passed out in January 1969, as a commissioned Pilot Officer. He won the coveted “Speed Bird Trophy” as the best cadet in flying and airmanship.

He earned the rank of Flight-Lieutenant in April 1978. He was an efficient officer with a close rapport with his men.null

During his service with the Ghana Air Force, he witnessed the deterioration of discipline and morale, reflecting the corruption of the regime of the Supreme Military Council (SMC) at that time.

As promotion brought him into contact with the privileged classes and their social values, his awareness of the injustices in society was sharpened.

He was thus regarded with some unease by the SMC. He read widely and discussed social and political ideas with a growing circle of like-minded friends and colleagues.

On May 28, 1979, Flt.-Lt. Rawlings, together with six others, appeared before a General Court Martial in Accra, charged with leading a mutiny of junior officers and men of the Ghana Armed Forces on 15th May, 1979. There was strong public reaction, especially after his statement had been read in court, explaining the social injustices that had prompted him to act.

The ranks of the Armed Forces, in particular, expressed deep sympathy with his stated aims. When he was scheduled for another court appearance on 4th June, 1979, Flt.-Lt. Rawlings was sprung from custody. With the support of both military and civilians, he led a revolt, which decisively ousted the Supreme Military Council from office and brought the Armed Forces Revolutionary Council (AFRC) into being.null

The AFRC, under the chairmanship of Flt.Lt. Rawlings carried out a “house-cleaning exercise” aimed at purging the Armed Forces and society at large of corruption and graft as well as restoring a sense of moral responsibility and the principles of accountability and probity in public life.

Meanwhile, following the programme already set in motion before the 4th June Uprising for civilian administration, general elections were held.

On 24th September 1979, the AFRC handed over to the civilian Government of the People’s National Party (PNP) under President Hilla Limann.

On 31st December 1981, Flt. Lt. Rawlings led a section of the Armed Forces to overthrow the PNP administration. A Provisional National Defence Council (PNDC), composed of both civilian and military members, was established, with Flt-Lt. J.J. Rawlings as the Chairman.

His interests include reading, building model aircraft, horse-riding and swimming. He is married to Nana Konadu Agyeman-Rawlings with whom he has four children – three girls and a boy.null

Flt-Lt. Rawlings ceased to be a member of the Ghana Armed Forces with effect from September 14, 1992. He formed the National Democratic Congress, which contested and won the 1992 Presidential and Parliamentary elections. He and the party again won the 1996 elections.

His term of office ended in the year 2000.

He is the joint recipient of the 1993 World Hunger Prize. He holds an Honorary Doctor of Law Degree from Medgar Evers College, City University of New York and Lincoln University Doctorate Degree for Diplomacy and Development.

Culled from Ghanaweb

Continue reading
Image

Ex-Ghanaian President, Jerry Rawlings Slams Nigeria’s Romance With British, Recommends Restructuring As Way Forward |RN

Former military head of state and civilian president of Ghana, Mr Jerry Rawlings

The Former president and military head of state of Ghana, Mr Jerry Rawlings recently poured his heart on the failure of Nigeria and her romance with the former colonialist, Britain. He gave his piece of mind to the issue of Nigeria’s apparent poverty, conflict and lack of development.

He had these to sy about Nigeria:

“I can’t believe that despite the setback of Nigeria as a result of a failed British experiment on that country, Nigeria is still very much in Love with them.

He Further said that “Nigeria has everything it needs to be the greatest country not just in Africa but in the world the British knew about it”.

There are two things that can salvage Nigeria:

“The first is Nigeria must peacefully retire these old colonial leaders who are still servants to western imperialism,

“The second is Nigerians must restructure their country back to the days when it was regional system of government.

Let every region develop at its own pace, build its resources and people”.

“With this that country called NigerIia will be the greatest hub for the people of color in the world”.

Subscribe to The Republican News. Advertise with us. Call us for press release, enquiries. Email: RepublicanNewsNetwork1@gmail.com, phone: +32497220468, +23481819650279, +32466100102.

https://facebook.com/TheRepulicanNews, https://twitter.com/RNNetwork1, https://instagram.com/therepublicannews1

Continue reading
Image

Kofi Annan’s Body Arrives In Ghana For Funeral |The Republican News

                                                                   Kofi Annan

The remains of former United Nations Secretary-General, Kofi Annan, will arrive in Ghana on Monday, for the start of the three-day state funeral organised by the government of Ghana.

The Kofi Annan Funeral Committee in consultation with the family of the Former UN Secretary-General released details of his burial in Accra, reports Citinewsroom.

Kofi Annan, who was the 7th Secretary General of the UN, died in Switzerland on the 18th August, 2018.

Addressing the press in Accra, Information Minister-designate, Kojo Oppong-Nkrumah, said the body of the former UN boss will arrive on September 10 accompanied by his widow Nane Maria Annan, children, and some officials from the UN.

The remains will be received by the Ghana Armed forces and the President of the Republic, Nana Akufo-Addo before it is moved to the Accra International Conference Centre.

Annan’s body will be laid to rest on Thursday.   (Punch)

http://www.twitter.com/RNNetwork1

Continue reading

Image

Look At Genevieve Nnaji’s Multi-billion Naira Mansion In Ghana (VIDEO)

By Chibiko Ikenna Offor

She is a top Nollywood actress, one of the pioneers of the fast growing Nollywood film and entertainment industry.

Genevieve Nnaji is a household name in the movie industry that no one in Nigeria or Africa could think twice before remembering her name or one of her movies.

She was even once slated to stare alongside a world-renowned Pinewood Film legendary movie franchise know as James Bond, or 007, a licensed British royal secret agent and killer. She is definitely a success story in Nigeria as well as Africa.

She has had a stint in Hollywood but has gone recently silent in Nollywood movie industry films, but her name can still re-echo anytime it is mentioned.

Her wealth is also not very common and could be seen here in this video from DTS that she has accumulated some good assets for herself.

She should enjoy her life, she has worked hard for it.

Genevieve_Nnaji_in_Weekend_Getaway

http://www.twitter.com/RNNetwork1

Continue reading

Image

From West Africa To Baltimore: A Ghanaian Long Path To Education For A Hopkins Star

 

Tim Prudente
George Mwinnyaa                               © Amy Davis/Baltimore Sun/TNS George Mwinnyaa

 

The remote bushlands of West Africa are far from Johns Hopkins University, and the path was neither sure nor straight for the boy whose name meant “beloved by his ancestors.” They called him Kpimenongme Mwinnyaa.

Only now, as he prepares to graduate – having been baptized George, having earned semester after semester of straight A’s despite grades once too poor for college – does he dare believe it’s more than a dream.

George Mwinnyaa, 29, will receive a bachelor’s degree in public health with academic honors during Hopkins’ commencement Wednesday.

Mwinnyaa, who is from Ghana, says he slips on a woven African smock each morning to remember where his path began.

“If you don’t know where you come from, you will not know where you are going,” he says.

He comes from a remote village in Nandom-Guo, where a cobra bite kills fast and cholera even faster. Polygamy was the custom and his father had seven wives and 32 children. George was the youngest of them all. He was about five years old when his father died and his widowed mother was left to raise seven children. A slight woman, she held off starvation with her wits, boiling hot peppers into soup. A few spoonfuls would cause George to gulp water to ease his hunger.

Each morning he woke before sunrise to fetch water from the river and hoe the dry plot that never grew enough beans. Then he walked a path through the bush to cinder-block desks arranged beneath a shea tree, a place they called school.

He earned poor grades, C’s at best. When he led his class in the morning routine, he burned with shame from the holes in his pants; he had no underwear.

Somehow, his mother managed to pay his school fees. Monica Naaludong persuaded teachers to take him when his tuition was late. She sold her traditional beads and hand-woven cloths to afford his books. George held back his frustration when she insisted education was more important than a full belly.

“She knew that education was a way to change not only me, but my whole family’s destiny,” he said.

His grades were too poor for college, but Ghana’s health department offered to train traveling health workers. Two years later, he was riding a motorbike to rural villages, immunizing children against yellow fever and polio. He waded across rivers carrying vaccines on his head. He taught mothers breastfeeding methods and measured the heartbeats of their babies.

He earned less than $9 a day, a life-changing salary, and bought his mother the traditional cloths she once sold for his books.

In the coastal city of Esiama he met a Peace Corps worker from Alaska, and all his questions about America tumbled out. He saw a job opening online for a health worker in Haiti. What was a resume? he asked her.

“I was like, ‘He’ll never be able to save enough money for a plane ticket, but I’ll help with a resume,'” Leslie Lucas said.

When they walked along the beach, she told herself it was customary for friends to hold hands in Ghana. But they married in a local chapel in August 2012. One year later, the couple boarded an airplane and flew to America.

A surprise arrival

Dr. Henry Perry taught Hopkins students about Ghana’s health workers for nearly a decade before one showed up on his campus in Baltimore. It was spring 2016, and Perry heard of a transfer who had worked in the Ghana community health service.

“To have one of them end up coming here to our university is entirely unusual,” said Perry, a professor in the Bloomberg School of Public Health. “I don’t know if this has ever happened.”

He invited George Mwinnyaa to share his experience with a class. Later, he learned of the young man’s path.

George and Leslie Mwinnyaa had settled in the suburbs east of Reno, Nevada, where she worked as a school counselor. George walked the mile each day to Fernley Elementary School and his job as a janitor.

The admissions office at University of Nevada, Reno, turned him down. Nearby Truckee Meadows Community College requested his high school transcripts. George didn’t even have a birth certificate. He passed an exam to enter Western Nevada College and made the dean’s list.

American colleges had libraries and tutors, he discovered. Professors even held office hours. The young man who was raised without any advantages was now embracing every one.

“You have the Internet. You have light. How does somebody fail in America?” he said.

He watched college lectures on YouTube again and again, telling himself he must study twice as hard to compete. He transferred to Truckee Meadows and earned an associate’s degree in spring 2015, finishing with a 4.0 GPA. He was inducted in the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society. One day he burst into the office of his biology professor with news. Johns Hopkins University offered him a scholarship. Now his path led to the nation’s premier public health program.

“That was his ultimate dream,” said Laura Briggs, his biology professor at Truckee Meadows.

She threw a farewell party for George and Leslie Mwinnyaa and guests passed around a hat to collect money for the couple’s drive to Baltimore. They left the next day with their 3-week-old son, Yiri.

George Mwinnyaa entered Hopkins in fall of 2015 and began acing classes. By spring, he was enrolled in Professor Karen Masterson’s science writing class, where she presented a live video lecture by a Dutch expert. George asked if he might address the expert on the screen.

“George gave this eloquent, smart thank-you that was about a minute long,” Masterson said. “I didn’t even think to do that and I was the professor, right?”

She went to the academic adviser for public health students, asking, “Who is George?”

By then, the adviser, Lisa Folda, had befriended the young father. She gave him the old stroller and baby gate in her basement.

“We don’t take many transfers. We definitely take a very few from community college,” she said. “To know George’s origin story and how he wound up in Reno was to know he wasn’t going to take any opportunity for granted.”

He was selected last year from more than 100 applicants around the country who applied for about 15 prestigious undergraduate scholarships from the National Institutes of Health. He will work this summer at a lab in East Baltimore, testing blood samples from South Africans with HIV.

In boyhood, George Mwinnyaa walked barefoot on a dirt path to school from a house built of mud and cow dung. On Wednesday, he will walk his shortest yet longest path of all: across Hopkins’ graduation stage.    (Baltimore Sun)

http://www.twitter.com/RNNetwork1

Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: