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This Is What Happens When You Don’t Drink Enough Water |The Republican News

Dominique Michelle Astorino
Effects of Dehydration          © POPSUGAR Photography / Kat Borchart Effects of Dehydration  

Besides the fact that you’d literally die without it, there are many, MANY imperative reasons to drink water frequently, every single day. It starts out pretty mild – you might feel thirsty and have a dry mouth. But the long-term effects of not drinking enough water not only have an effect on your weight (in a bad way), but they’re also extremely dangerous and life-threatening.

Here’s what happens to your body.

Milder Symptoms

Even mild dehydration has strong effects. Here’s how you’ll feel with a lack of H2O (hint: it’s really not fun).

  • Fatigue, tiredness, sleepiness
  • A headache
  • Constipation
  • Dizziness
  • Mood change, irritability, increased anxiety
  • Sunken eyes
  • Shrivelled skin
  • Muscle cramps
  • Joint aches

 

Severe Symptoms

If things get worse, so do your symptoms. These are the “go to the hospital” signs.

  • Low blood pressure, with a rapid heartbeat
  • Fever
  • Delirium, unconsciousness
  • Severe diarrhoea and/or vomiting
  • Inability to keep fluids down

Latent Effects

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Consistently not drinking enough water for an extended period of time has its effect as well. Although you may brush off the milder side effects, your body is still suffering – and several of these have a significant bearing on weight gain.

  • Low water, slow metabolism. Your body’s ability to remove waste and detoxify is inhibited. In addition, your metabolism is slower without water. One study found that drinking 16 ounces of water daily increases your metabolic rate by 30 percent. Guys. That’s literally ONE standard-size water bottle. JUST DRINK IT.
  • Increased hunger. When you’re somewhat dehydrated, your body confuses it for hunger, causing you to eat when you don’t need to. Read: weight gain.
  • Slowed circulation, irregular temperature. Your CV system suffers, and your equilibrium is totally out of whack.
  • Digestion problems. That constipation we talked about becomes a regular thing. Not fun. Also not great for weight loss.
  • General fatigue. Same goes for your energy levels. You’ll constantly feel tired, unable (or unwilling) to exercise, and unable to concentrate.
  • Increased blood sugar. Your body needs water to break down sugar. If you’re diabetic, this is especially dangerous.

Severe Long-Term Effects

Now for the worst of it. Yes, it’s terrible that dehydration can make you gain weight (or keep you from losing it), but there are some bigger issues at hand. If you’re truly neglecting your water intake, this should likely help you get on track. Here’s what happens to your body when you don’t get enough water.

  • Heat injury
  • Brain swelling
  • Seizures
  • Hypovolemic shock
  • Kidney failure
  • Coma and death

Now go get yourself a water bottle and FILL. IT. UP.     (PopSugar)

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Why You Should Not Drink While On Antibiotics |The Republican News

Cory Stieg
Refinery29            © Photographed by Natalia Mantini. Refinery29
You were responsible enough to go to the doctor and get antibiotics for your pesky urinary tract infection, but you also have a happy hour tonight that you do not want to miss. Technically, you’re not “supposed to” drink when you’re taking antibiotics, but what’s the worst thing that could happen if you crack open a cold one tonight? You might have heard from a well-meaning friend that drinking on antibiotics just “makes you get drunker, faster,” but it’s actually more complex than that.There are two main reasons why you should avoid alcohol while on a course of antibiotics: There’s potential for increased side effects, and the alcohol could interact with the drug’s ability to do its job, explains Stephen Ferrara, RN, DNP, RNC-BC, associate dean for clinical affairs at Columbia University School of Nursing, who oversees its faculty practice, ColumbiaDoctors Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Group. And those side effects are way worse than just your typical hangover.

If you do decide to have a few drinks while on antibiotics, you could experience a slew of gorgeous symptoms, such as increased heart rate, changes in blood pressure, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, gastrointestinal pain and discomfort, headaches, redness of the skin, dizziness, drowsiness, and damage to the liver, Dr. Ferrara says. Yikes. There are certain antibiotics (such as Metronidazole, Ketoconazole, and Griseofulvin, for example) that will definitely cause an intense and significant reaction to alcohol, so you really shouldn’t drink, he says. “Outside of these medications, a drink or two should not cause significant reactions while on antibiotics, although the potential always exists.” So, it’s better to be safe than sorry.

Besides possibly making you feel terrible, if you drink alcohol on antibiotics it’ll take you longer to recover from whatever infection you’re treating, Dr. Ferrara says. “Moderate to heavy alcohol consumption increases liver enzymes released in the bloodstream,” he says. “Since the liver is responsible for metabolising antibiotics, the effects of antibiotics can be reduced.” So, while that carafe of wine might be calling your name at the end of a long week, you’ll just end up having to take your antibiotics longer, so it’s better to just wait until you’re recovered..

As for the whole “getting drunker, faster” thing? That’s somewhat true, according to Dr. Ferrara. Drinking alcohol causes dehydration, increasing the amount of alcohol in the bloodstream, he says. “When someone has an infection, they may already be partially dehydrated.” Alcohol is also a central nervous system depressant, so when it’s combined with antibiotics (or medications) that also affect the central nervous system, “the effects of both can be potentiated,” he says. “In other words, symptoms like poor coordination, dizziness, somnolence are increased since both are acting on the central nervous system.” And those are all symptoms associated with being drunk, so you can see how people assume that they’re just getting “drunker.”

Let’s be clear: Drinking on antibiotics to fast-track your buzz isn’t a good idea. While you’re treating an infection, whether it’s a UTI or bacterial infection, it’s extra-important to rest, stay hydrated, and take the entire course of the antibiotic as prescribed, Dr. Ferrara says. Even though you can’t get sloshed with your friends this weekend, you will be feeling better sooner — which is worth it, right?  (Refinery29)

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