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Arab Ministers Demand Trump Rescind Jerusalem Decision |The Republican News

Donald-Trump-Benjamin-Netanyahu
          President Donald Trump and Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu. 

 

Arab foreign ministers on Saturday called on the United States to rescind its recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and for the international community to recognise a Palestinian state.

In a resolution after an emergency meeting in Cairo, Arab League member ministers said that the United States had “withdrawn itself as a sponsor and broker” of the Israel Palestinian peace process with its controversial move.

The ministers met at the league’s headquarters in Cairo to formulate a response to the US decision, which has been roundly criticised in the Arab world and internationally.

The move by US President Donald Trump is “denounced and condemned,” Arab League chief Ahmed Abul Gheit told the ministers at the beginning of the meeting.

The ministers agreed on “demanding that the United States rescind its decision on Jerusalem…and the calling on the international community to recognise the state of Palestine…with east Jerusalem as its capital.”

They also said they would head to the United Nations Security Council for a resolution condemning the US decision as a violation of international law.

The decision has sparked protests and clashes in Palestinian territories since Trump announced the decision on Wednesday which drew criticism from every other member of the UN Security Council at an emergency meeting on Friday.

Palestinian Authority president Mahmud Abbas has cancelled a scheduled meeting the US Vice President Mike Pence in Ramallah later this month.

In Egypt, which Pence will also visit, the country’s top Muslim and Christian clerics have both cancelled scheduled meetings with Pence in protest at the decision.

There have been fears of a much larger escalation of violence after Hamas leader Ismail Haniya called for a new Palestinian intifada, or uprising.

Hamas and the smaller Islamic Jihad militant group both renewed that call on Saturday.

Abbas’s Fatah organisation urged Palestinians to “keep up confrontation and broaden it to all points where the Israeli army is present” in the West Bank.

Israel seized Arab east Jerusalem in the 1967 Six-Day War and later annexed it in a move never recognised by the international community.

The Palestinians want the eastern sector as the capital of their future state.

The international community does not recognise the ancient city as Israel’s capital, insisting the issue can only be resolved in negotiations.

AFP

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Protests Erupt In Middle East After Donald Trump Declares Jerusalem Capital Of Israel

Tom Powell

                           (Provided by: Reuters)
 

Protests have erupted across the Middle East after Donald Trump made the historic and highly controversial move to officially recognise Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.

In a ground-breaking speech at the White House, the president ended decades of US neutrality on Jerusalem and promised to relocate the US embassy there from Tel Aviv.

The move sparked fury among Palestinians, who immediately took to the streets in protest at a decision that they claim shatters hopes for peace in the war-torn region.

Jerusalem is regarded as a capital by both Israel and Palestine, making it the highly combustible centre of the decades-long Israeli-Arab conflict.

a group of people sitting at night: an136620567istanbul-turkey-.jpg   © Provided by Independent Print Limited an136620567istanbul-turkey-.jpg

Defying worldwide warnings, Mr Trump insisted that after repeated peace failures it was time for a new approach.

“We cannot solve our problems by making the same failed assumptions and repeating the same failed strategies of the past,” he said.

Following the speech, Palestinians in the West Bank and East Jerusalem – areas occupied by Israel – began protests by burning flags, pictures and chanting anti-American slogans.

In Gaza – the thin coastal strip cut off by Israel – groups were also pictured setting fire to American flags.

an136614787epa06372508-prot.jpg   © Provided by Independent Print Limited an136614787epa06372508-prot.jpg  

In the West Bank town of Bethlehem, Christmas tree lights were switched off in protest outside the Church of the Nativity, seen by Christians as the birthplace of Jesus.

Protesters also took to the streets in Amman, the capital of neighbouring Jordan, where Palestinian refugees in the Baqqa refugee camp denounced Mr Trump’s actions. Similar displays were seen in Egypt’s capital Cairo.

Meanwhile, Palestinian factions agreed to a general strike and midday rallies on Thursday.

a group of people standing around a fire                      © Provided by Independent Print Limited  

The Palestinian education ministry declared a day off and urged teachers as well as high school and university students to take part in the planned rallies in the Israeli-occupied West Bank, the Gaza Strip and Palestinian areas in Jerusalem.

Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu spoke out in praise of Mr Trump’s speech, but no other world government lent its support.

Palestinians burn an Israeli and a U.S. flag during a protest against the U.S. intention to move its embassy to Jerusalem and to recognize the city of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, in Gaza City.                        Protesters react to Trump’s Jerusalem decision  

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas said the US shift is a boost for extremist groups that want religious war and signals American withdrawal from being a peace mediator.

Theresa May she disagreed with the move and described Mr Trump’s actions as “unhelpful”.

She said: “Our position on the status of Jerusalem is clear and long-standing: it should be determined in a negotiated settlement between the Israelis and the Palestinians, and Jerusalem should ultimately be the shared capital of the Israeli and Palestinian states.”

Jeremy Corbyn tweeted: “Trump’s recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, including occupied Palestinian territory, is a reckless threat to peace.

“The British Government must condemn this dangerous act and work for a just and viable settlement of the conflict.”   (Evening Standard)

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Trump To Move US Embassy In Tel Aviv To Jerusalem |The Republican News

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The official Palestinian news agency says President Donald Trump informed Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas of his plans to move the U.S. Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to contested Jerusalem.

The WAFA agency says Trump informed Abbas of his decision in a phone call Tuesday.

Abbas spokesman Nabil Abu Rdeneh says Abbas warned Trump of the dangers of such a decision to Mideast peace efforts as well as security and stability in the region and the world.

The statement did not say if Trump told Abbas when he plans to move the embassy.

The Palestinians seek east Jerusalem as the capital of a future state, and have warned they would halt contacts with Washington if Trump makes unilateral decisions about the status of the city.

Jerusalem, home to key Muslim, Christian and Jewish shrines, is the combustible centerpiece of the Arab-Israeli conflict.

(Source: AP)

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BREAKING NEWS: Supreme Court Allows Trump Travel Ban To Take Effect Pending Appeal |RN

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                                   United States President, Donald J. Trump

The US Supreme Court said Monday that the government could fully enforce a ban on travellers from six mainly Muslim countries pending appeal, backing President Donald Trump in the year-long battle over the controversial measure.

The court stayed a lower court’s October ruling that had blocked implementation of the ban on visitors from Chad, Syria, Yemen, Iran, Somalia and Libya, as a legal challenge to it continues in federal appeals court.
AFP

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Donald Trump: Vladimir Putin ‘Absolutely Did Not Meddle In Our Election’

Jonathan Lemire and Jill Colvin
a group of people standing in front of a crowd posing for the camera: U.S. President Donald Trump and Russia's President Vladimir Putin talk during the family photo session at the APEC Summit in Danang, Vietnam on Nov. 11, 2017© Jorge Silva—AP U.S. President Donald Trump and Russia’s President Vladimir Putin talk during the family photo session at the APEC Summit in Danang, Vietnam on Nov. 11, 2017 (HANOI) — President Donald Trump said Russia’s Vladimir Putin once again vehemently denied interfering in the 2016 U.S. elections during their discussions on the sidelines of an economic summit Saturday. Trump declined to say whether he believed Putin, but made clear he’s not interested in dwelling on the issue.

“He said he absolutely did not meddle in our election. He did not do what they are saying he did,” Trump said of Putin, speaking with reporters aboard Air Force One as he traveled to Hanoi, the second-last stop of his Asia trip.

“Every time he sees me, he said: ‘I didn’t do that.’ And I believe, I really believe that when he tells me that he means it,” Trump said, noting that Putin is “very insulted” by the accusation. Trump called the accusation an “artificial barrier” erected by Democrats — once again casting doubt on the U.S. intelligence community’s conclusion that Russia did try to interfere in the election to help Trump win.

Trump and Putin did not have a formal meeting while they were in Vietnam for the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit, but the two spoke informally several times on the event’s sidelines and reached an agreement on a number of principles for the future of war-torn Syria.

But Trump made clear that the issue of Russian meddling in the election hovers over the leaders’ relationship and said it jeopardized their ability to work together on issues including North Korea’s escalating nuclear program and the deadly conflict in Syria.

“Having a good relationship with Russia’s a great, great thing. And this artificial Democratic hit job gets in the way,” Trump told reporters. “People will die because of it.”

Trump danced around the question of whether he believed Trump’s denials, telling reporters that pressing the issue would have accomplished little.

“He said he didn’t meddle. I asked him again. You can only ask so many times,” said Trump.

“Well, look, I can’t stand there and argue with him,” he added later. “I’d rather have him get out of Syria, to be honest with you. I’d rather have him, you know, work with him on the Ukraine than standing and arguing about whether or not – cause that whole thing was set up by the Democrats.”

Slide 3 of 36: US President Donald Trump and Russia's President Vladimir Putin (L-R front) shake hands during a family photo ceremony at the 2017 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit.

Trump’s suggestion that he may believe Putin over his own nation’s intelligence community is certain to re-ignite the firestorm over the issue of election meddling. Meanwhile, a special counsel investigation of potential collusion between Moscow and Trump campaign aides so far has resulted in two indictments for financial and other crimes unrelated to the campaign, as well as a guilty plea. Congressional committees have also been interviewing campaign and White House staff.

Earlier Saturday, the Kremlin issued a statement saying the leaders had reached agreement on a number of principles for the future of civil war-torn Syria now that the Islamic State group has largely been pushed out. Among the agreements’ key points, according to the Russians, were an affirmation of de-escalation zones, a system to prevent dangerous incidents between American and Russian forces, and a commitment to a peaceful solution governed by a Geneva peace process.

The Kremlin quickly promoted the agreement as the White House stayed silent. Trump told reporters that the deal was reached “very quickly” and that it would save “tremendous numbers of lives.” And he praised his relationship with Putin the two “seem to have a very good feeling for each other and a good relationship, considering we don’t know each other well.”

Presidents Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump          © AP Photo/Evan Vucci Presidents Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump

Snippets of video of from the summit in the sea-side city of Danang showed Trump and Putin shaking hands and chatting, including during the world leaders’ traditional group photo. The two walked together down a path to the photo site, conversing amiably, with Trump punctuating his thoughts with hand gestures and Putin smiling.

Journalists traveling with Trump were not granted access to any of the APEC events he participated in in the picturesque tropical seaside city Saturday.

White House officials had worked quietly behind the scenes negotiating with the Kremlin on the prospect of a formal meeting. The Russians raised expectations for such a session and Trump told reporters aboard Air Force One en route to Asia that it was “expected we’ll meet with Putin” to discuss issues including ramping up pressure on North Korea to halt its nuclear and ballistic weapons program.As speculation built, the two sides tried to craft the framework of a deal on the future of Syria that Trump and Putin could announce in a formal bilateral meeting, according to two administration officials not authorized to speak publicly about private discussions.

Though North Korea and the Ukraine had been discussed, the two sides focused on trying to strike an agreement about a path to resolve Syria’s civil war once the Islamic State group is defeated, according to officials. But the talks stalled and, minutes before Air Force One touched down in Vietnam, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders told reporters the meeting was off.

Trump will be attending a state dinner in Hanoi Saturday night. On Sunday, he’ll meet with the country’s president and prime minister before heading to his last stop: The Philippines.   (Time)

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U.S. Will Defend Allies From North Korea With ‘Full Range Of Unmatched Military Capability’ – Donald Trump

President Donald Trump gestures during a joint press conference with South Korea's President Moon Jae-in at the presidential Blue House in Seoul© AFP President Donald Trump gestures during a joint press conference with South Korea’s President Moon Jae-in at the presidential Blue House in Seoul  

Donald Trump has said the US will defend its allies against North Korea using the “full range of our unmatched military capabilities, if need be”.

The US President raised the spectre of nuclear war during a visit to Seoul, South Korea.

At a press conference alongside President Moon Jae-in, Mr Trump said Pyongyang’s nuclear and missile programmes were threatening “millions” of people.

Trump wants £3m to ‘detect, defeat, and defend’ against North Korea

“It’s time to act with urgency and great determination,” he said.

While the US was trying to talk Kim Jong-un down from his nuclear ambitions using “all available tools short of military action”, Mr Trump said that “the US stands prepared to defend itself and its allies using the full range of our unmatched military capabilities, if need be”.

He made similar comments earlier in his tour of the Asia-Pacific region, when he told troops at Yokota air base near Tokyo: “Together with our allies, America’s warriors are prepared to defend our nation using the full range of our unmatched capabilities.”

Mr Moon said he and Mr Trump had finalised an earlier agreement to allow South Korea to possess more powerful missiles in the face of growing North Korean threats.

He said the two had agreed to lift the warhead payload limits on South Korean ballistic missiles and that the allies are also cooperating on strengthening South Korea’s defence capabilities through the acquisition or development of advanced weapons systems.      (The Independent)

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Despite Tough Talk, Trump Follows Obama Footsteps On Terror Suspects |RN

By SADIE GURMAN
In this Nov. 1, 2017 photo, President Donald Trump speaks during a cabinet meeting at the White House in Washington. Trump on Thursday backed away from his threat to send the suspect in the New York bike path attack to Guantanamo Bay, acknowledging in an early morning tweet that the military judicial process at the Cuban detention center takes longer than the civilian federal court system. But Trump called again for the man to be executed. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)© The Associated Press In this Nov. 1, 2017 photo, President Donald Trump speaks during a cabinet meeting at the White House in Washington. Trump on Thursday backed away from his threat to send the…

 

WASHINGTON — Donald Trump promised he would fill the military prison at Guantanamo Bay with “bad dudes” and slammed the Obama administration for prosecuting terrorists in U.S. courts. But so far, Trump has treated terror suspects just as President Barack Obama did, passing on Guantanamo in favor of having his own Justice Department lawyers try them in federal court.

The strongest sign yet that he is retreating from his earlier promise came Thursday, when Trump conceded that the civilian courts offer a swifter way to bring terror suspects to justice in the communities they attacked.

A day after he assailed the U.S. criminal justice system as a “joke” and a “laughingstock,” Trump backed off his threat to send the suspect in Tuesday’s New York bike path rampage to the troubled military commission system at Guantanamo.

“Statistically that process takes much longer than going through the Federal system,” Trump said in an early morning tweet, adding that there is “also something appropriate” about keeping him “in the home of the horrible crime he committed.”

It was legally questionable whether the Trump administration could have sent 29-year-old Sayfullo Saipov to Guantanamo, in part because the courts have not ruled whether the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force — which permits the government to detain enemy combatants for the duration of a military conflict — applies to the Islamic State and its followers. And no one held within the U.S. has been sent to Guantanamo since the detention center opened in January 2002 to hold suspected members of al-Qaida and the Taliban.

Trump has passed on other chances to send suspects there, including earlier this week, when the Justice Department said a militant captured in Libya and accused of playing an instrumental role in the 2012 Benghazi attacks would be prosecuted in federal court in Washington, where a trial for the alleged mastermind is already under way.

On Wednesday, the U.S. announced that a man arrested in Bosnia had been brought to New York to face charges that he abandoned the United States in 2013 to join the Islamic State group. And the administration this summer sent an al-Qaida suspect linked to a plot to kill a Swedish cartoonist from Spain to Philadelphia to face terrorism charges in federal court, another break from Trump’s tough-on-terror talk.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who has long argued that terror suspects should be prosecuted at the military prison, expressed confidence Thursday that the U.S. justice system can handle terror suspects like Saipov, an immigrant from Uzbekistan who authorities say was inspired by the Islamic State.

Sessions said the administration would “use all lawful tools at our disposal” in the fight against terror, leaving open the possibility of sending suspects to Guantanamo, but touting for the first time the hundreds of terrorism-related convictions the Justice Department has secured since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

Trump’s early record is a far cry from the rhetoric of his fellow Republicans who for years demanded terror suspects be held as enemy combatants.

Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said Thursday he was “dumbfounded as to why the Trump administration still follows the Obama playbook when it comes to dealing with terror suspects.” Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona made a similar call for Saipov to be interrogated as an enemy combatant, without some of the protections afforded under the American legal system.

Trump’s argument that Saipov should be tried in the same place where he committed his attack closely resembles the one Obama and former Attorney General Eric Holder made in trying to move the five men accused in the Sept. 11 attacks from Guantanamo to New York for trial in a civilian court. That effort that was derailed by political opposition. The men remain at Guantanamo and have yet to be tried. Their cases are likely years from resolution.

Holder expressed vindication after Trump changed course Thursday, writing on Twitter: “Those who criticized my decision to try 9/11 plotters in federal system take note. I was right. 16 years-no justice. Use courts-not Gitmo.”

Just seven men have been convicted at Guantanamo either by trial before military commission or through plea bargains, including four whose convictions were later overturned on appeal or invalidated.

Mary McCord, who oversaw the Justice Department’s National Security Division before her departure in April, said she hoped Trump and Sessions were beginning to recognize the long and successful track record of federal terrorism prosecutors.

“It’s a good sign that the president and the attorney general are listening to the advice of counterterrorism prosecutors, career professionals who have a lot to offer” when it comes making decisions about where to try such suspects.

But the Justice Department said only that such decisions are made on a case-by-case basis and wouldn’t say whether the recent cases are a sign of any formal policy. It remains to be seen how the administration will handle a U.S. citizen picked up on the Syrian battlefield in September for allegedly fighting with Islamic State militants.

In at least a physical sense, there are no practical reasons why the U.S. couldn’t hold someone at Guantanamo. The detention center, which reached a maximum population of about 680 in the summer of 2003, is now down to just 41.    (Associated Press)

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