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Mysterious Change In Trump’s Demeanor Since After The S..thole News Cycle… No One Knows Why

Allan Smith
US President Donald Trump              © Catalyst Images US President Donald Trump

 

President Donald Trump has been much more subdued since the “s***hole countries” news cycle.

  • He has delivered six speeches in the past couple of weeks without stepping on his intended message.
  • On Twitter, he’s been much more restrained.

President Donald Trump has been relatively subdued in recent weeks — and his poll numbers have spiked.

The trend can be traced back to the passing of the news cycle about his “s***hole countries” remark from the middle of last month. In the weeks that followed, he has only posted a handful of acerbic or unnecessary tweets — virtually unprecedented for such a length of time — and delivered a series of speeches that remained on message.

It’s a frequent occurrence for Trump to initiate a days- or weeks-long news cycle on a subject unrelated to the message he and his administration were trying to drive home.

And the trend has been noticed by observers.

“I have noticed,” Alex Conant, a Republican strategist and communications director for Sen. Marco Rubio’s 2016 presidential campaign, told Business Insider in an email. “The president’s shown more message discipline in the last month than he did in all of 2017. It’s directly correlated with general improvement in his poll numbers.”

Conant is right about the correlation between Trump’s weeks of relative calm and the improved polling. On Thursday, Trump’s approval rating reached its highest point in months, according to the RealClearPolitics aggregate of polls.

Trump began February with a 41.5% approval rating in RCP. It was his highest rating since he hit 41.7% on September 24, and it was just the second time his average rating was 41.5% or higher since mid-May.

Donald Trump        © Provided by Business Insider Donald Trump

‘It’s very clear that he’s cognizant of not stepping on himself and not stepping on his own news cycle’

The improved rating came on the heels of three polls published following Trump’s State of the Union address. Both an Economist/YouGov poll and a Monmouth University survey found Trump’s approval rating to be 44%, while a right-leaning Rasmussen poll put Trump’s approval rating at 45%.

The State of the Union address itself polled well among an audience that was skewed a bit more conservative than the voting populace at large and featured Trump touting his first-year accomplishments in addition to calling for revitalizing US infrastructure and overhauling the immigration system. In addition to that speech, which saw Trump stay firmly on message, the president has delivered five speeches since mid-January that have all remained on point.

US President Donald Trump                      © Catalyst Images US President Donald Trump  

They included remarks on tax cuts and the economy at H&K Equipment outside of Pittsburgh, his speech at the March for Life, the address he delivered at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, the swearing in of Alex Azar as Health and Human Services secretary, and his Thursday speech to House and Senate Republicans at their retreat in West Virginia.

“I think he has gotten a lot better at driving a message,” a former White House official told Business Insider. “He’s always been extremely talented at putting a message out there, but I think he’s gotten really good at letting something just stay out.”

“It’s very clear that he’s cognizant of not stepping on himself and not stepping on his own news cycle,” they added. “I think that’s what we’ve seen recently where he’s left a little bit of room for people to breathe. The State of the Union happened and I think after it, a lot of people were expecting some sort of tweet that would step on that news cycle. That didn’t happen.”

US President Donald Trump               © Catalyst Images US President Donald Trump  

Indeed, that wasn’t the only time the president decided to remain a bit calmer on Twitter during this time. Save for a couple of tweets about “Cryin” Chuck Schumer, responding to a comment from music mogul Jay-Z, and commenting on the text messages sent between FBI officials Peter Strzok and Lisa Page, the president hasn’t sparked much — if any — news with his tweets since the middle of last month. He even went three days without tweeting at all, save for one post that was clearly set up by a staffer.

Again, that’s virtually unheard of for a stretch of time that long. And it’s during a time when plenty is going on in the background.

The Russia investigation is seemingly reaching a climax, with officials such as FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe being shown the door, a potentially explosive Republican memo from the House Intelligence Committee causing tension between the White House and Justice Department, and reports that Trump himself has sought to push out Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein or even special counsel Robert Mueller.

US President Donald Trump            © Catalyst Images US President Donald Trump  

Plus, there was a three-day government shutdown that occurred during this time. But Trump was able come out on top, at least in the short term, by staying on the sidelines.

The former White House official said they did not know if there was a specific triggering event that led to the sudden change in Trump’s demeanor, but added that the president is “reaping” the benefits of such a change.

“I think he figured out really quickly that a big important thing in politics is to not step on your own message, to not step on your own good news cycle,” the former official said. “I think he’s been very effective over the last couple days and weeks at doing that.”

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Trump’s State Of The Union Address: Winners And Losers |The Republican News

Aaron Blake
a man in a suit and tie: President Trump delivers the State of the Union address in the House chamber on Tuesday. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)       © Provided by WP Company LLC d/b/a The Washington Post

 

President Trump delivers the State of the Union address in the House chamber on Tuesday. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images) President Trump delivered his second address to Congress and his first official State of the Union address Tuesday night. And a year after that address earned plenty of praise, Trump did his best to re-create its aspirational, highflying tone. At least for most of the speech.

So what were the big takeaways? Below: some winners and losers.

WINNERS

Strength metaphors

Trump began by saying the state of the union was “strong because our people are strong.” He said of dealing with countries such as China and Russia: “Weakness is the surest path to conflict, and unmatched power is the surest means of our defense.” He said of dealing with the Islamic State: “Past experience has taught us that complacency and concessions only invite aggression and provocation.” He talked about the country being in the process of “regain[ing] its strength.” He pushed to “annihilate” terrorists. Trump was going for a muscular speech — quite literally.

Trump’s illusion of unity

a group of people posing for the camera: Rep. Steve Scalise (R-La.) acknowledges Trump's introduction during the State of the Union address. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)© Provided by WP Company LLC d/b/a The Washington Post Rep. Steve Scalise (R-La.) acknowledges Trump’s introduction during the State of the Union address. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

One of the biggest applause lines in Trump’s 2017 speech was when he declared, “The time for trivial fights is behind us.” Democrats and even many Republicans hoped it signaled a new day. It was false hope. Whatever you think of Trump, his M.O. is almost always to drive a wedge between the two sides of American politics, solidifying his base and causing his critics to become outraged. Trump alluded to the same mythical brand of unity Tuesday.

“Tonight, I call upon all of us to set aside our differences, to seek out common ground, and to summon the unity we need to deliver for . . . the people we were elected to serve,” he said. The past 11 months, though, have proven over and over that Trump has little interest in making such unification a reality. And even in his speech, Trump decided to raise highly divisive issues such as national anthem protests and crimes by undocumented immigrants.

Steve Scalise

In a speech that began with Trump praising heroes who had sacrificed for their country, the House majority whip got arguably the biggest ovation. Trump labeling him the “legend from Louisiana” was a particularly memorable tribute for the congressman who was shot at a congressional baseball practice and returned to Congress after months of rehab.

Tax cuts

Perhaps as was to be expected, Trump reserved a big chunk of his speech for the lone signature legislative accomplishment of his first year: tax cuts. He mentioned the word “tax” 16 times and painted a picture of a growing American economy that just got a shot in the arm. The tax cuts were severely unpopular when they passed, but Republicans have hitched their wagon to them. And after a long year, the Republicans in the room sure seemed happy to have the chance to brag about something.

LOSERS

The truth

Trump is no stranger to hyperbole and straight-up false claims, and his first State of the Union was no exception. He said the United States is “now an exporter of energy to the world.” Wrong. He said Congress passed and he signed “the biggest tax cuts and reform in American history.” Wrong. He said,“We have eliminated more regulations in our first year than any administration in history.” That might be true, but because available records don’t go back beyond a few decades, we simply don’t know. Trump even claimed that his tax cuts were leading to bonuses — many of which were “thousands and thousands of dollars per worker.” The most publicized bonuses, though, were generally $1,000. These are part of Trump’s everyday talking points, so hearing them in this speech wasn’t jarring. But it is notable that the White House uses bogus and unproven claims even on this stage.

U.S. President Donald J. Trump arrives for the State of the Union address in the chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives January 30, 2018 in Washington, DC. U.S. President Donald J. Trump arrives for the State of the Union address in the chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives January 30, 2018 in Washington, DC. Brevity

The longest State of the Union on record since the 1960s was President Bill Clinton’s in 2000. It clocked in at just under one hour and 29 minutes. Trump’s speech Tuesday night didn’t exceed that, but for a time, it seemed it might. The final clock on Trump’s speech was more than one hour and 20 minutes, which was the third-longest on record, according to the American Presidency Project. He clearly wasn’t considering those of us with young children.

The deep state

This speech was hardly a screed against secret operators within the government trying to take him down, but Trump made several allusions to the idea that the American government hasn’t been on their side. “Americans love their country, and they deserve a government that shows them the same love and loyalty in return,” he said at one point. He added: “For the last year, we have sought to restore the bonds of trust between our citizens and their government.” He even at one point alluded to a proposal to allow Cabinet secretaries to remove government employees who “fail the American people.” At a time when he and his supporters are increasingly pointing to alleged bias in law enforcement and Trump is reported to want to get rid of Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein and special counsel Robert S. Mueller III, those words seemed thicker.

U.S. President Donald J. Trump claps during the State of the Union address in the chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives January 30, 2018 in Washington, DC. U.S. President Donald J. Trump claps during the State of the Union address in the chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives January 30, 2018 in Washington, DC. Bipartisanship

The speech began with dozens of Democratic members of Congress not even present because they were boycotting. And for much of the speech, it seemed as though the rest of them might as well have stayed home, too. Even as Trump hailed uncontroversial and nonpartisan things such as rising wages, millions of jobs created and a new low in the black unemployment rate, Democrats didn’t stand. When Trump made the above plea for unity, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi’s (D-Calif.) disbelief practically leaped out at you during a brief cutaway on CSPAN’s cameras.

Immigration reform

Before he got to the details of his immigration proposal, Trump spent a lengthy period of the speech focused on crime committed by illegal immigrants. He even spotlighted four parents of teenagers who were killed by MS-13 gang members. It seemed geared toward assuring immigration hawks that he isn’t going soft by allowing “dreamers” a path to citizenship. But Democrats view this as an effort to demonize all of the undocumented population, and by the time Trump talked about specific proposals, they were having basically none of it.  (The Washington Post)

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Mueller Will Never Indict Trump |The Republican News

Paul Rosenzweig
Donald Trump and Robert Mueller           © Catalyst Images Donald Trump and Robert Mueller
Editor’s note: The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author on behalf of our content partner and do not represent the views of MSN or Microsoft 

The latest revelations about President Trump have, once again excited the interest of the public, leading to speculation that Special Counsel Robert Mueller may have amassed sufficient evidence to charge the president with obstruction of justice. Trump’s attempt to fire Mueller (which happened last June, but is only now being publicly reported) is, under this line of thinking, the final straw.

Color me deeply skeptical.

Mueller will not indict Trump for obstruction of justice or for any other crime.  Period. Full stop. End of story. Speculations to the contrary are just fantasy.

He won’t do it for the good and sufficient reason that the Department of Justice has a long-standing legal opinion that sitting presidents may not be indicted. First issued in 1973 during the Nixon era, the policy was reaffirmed in 2000, during the Clinton era. These rules bind all Department of Justice employees and Mueller, in the end, is a Department of Justice employee. More to the point, if we know anything about Mueller, we think we know that he follows the rules—all of them. Even the ones that restrict him in ways he would prefer they not. And if he were to choose not to follow the rules, that, in turn, would be a reasonable justification for firing him. So … the special counsel will not indict the president.

What can Mueller do if he finds evidence of criminality involving the president?  He can and will (as authorized by Department of Justice regulations) file a report on his findings with the attorney general (or, since Attorney General Sessions is, in this case, recused, with the deputy attorney general, Rod Rosenstein). Rosenstein will then be faced with the important decision of whether and how to make that report public—whether to convey it to Congress or not; whether to release it publicly or not. The regulations are so vague (they say only that he “may determine that public release of these reports would be in the public interest, to the extent that release would comply with applicable legal restrictions”) that they, in effect, give Rosenstein plenary discretion to do whatever he thinks is in the best interest of the country.

US President Donald Trump            © Catalyst Images US President Donald Trump

So, every time you read about the threat to fire Mueller, remember this—the critical actor in most future scenarios is not Mueller, but Rosenstein. Knowing Rosenstein personally, I have high confidence that he will make what he thinks is the best decision for the country—the same may not be true of his replacement (or of the replacement attorney general, should Sessions be fired). That, of course, is why the highly dubious “secret memo” prepared by House Republicans reportedly targets Rosenstein—even though he is a Trump appointee who advocated firing Comey, Trump supporters fear he will follow the rule of law.

But what of the substance of the obstruction charge? Are pundits right that the case against Trump is becoming stronger—even if as a legal matter the president may not be charged?

Collateral cases, like those involving obstruction and perjury, are ones that involve derivative offenses, not the principal charges under investigation. Proving them often turns on proof of intent. You have to show that the defendant acted with the purpose of obstructing an investigation. That means these cases tend to rise or fall on the strength of the case proving the underlying crime. It matters very much to juries and the public that we know exactly what it is that a defendant is covering up. If we don’t think it matters that much (as many in America seem to have concluded when confronted with President Clinton’s sexual conduct) or that it hasn’t been proven, then the cover up is often forgiven.

 In the Trump investigation, we have yet to determine whether the campaign was involved in an underlying crime of electoral manipulation involving Russia, much less how the broader American public thinks of it.  Many, like me, see strong evidence of Russian interference in the American election system and good evidence (though less strong) that some in the Trump campaign willingly accepted this and sought to take advantage of it. But candor compels the recognition that evidence of President Trump’s personal involvement is much thinner than, say, that of his son-in-law and other campaign staff.

Indeed, in many ways, the sheer numerosity and blatantness of the president’s interventions suggests that he really is sincere in thinking that he did nothing wrong. Were he truly concerned about the criminality of his former actions he might well have been more cautious in so openly attempting to subvert the investigation. Unless and until stronger evidence of the president’s personal involvement in contacts with Russian influence peddlers is developed, the derivative obstruction case will remain substantively problematic as well.

 All of which brings us to a final thought, admittedly far more speculative that what has gone before. Something concerns the president. That is clear. If it is not the alleged collusion with Russia, then what is it?

Wisps of information in the wind suggest a far different, deeper concern. The president’s finances have always been suspect. Some have thought them resting on shaky foundations. Ongoing investigations have looked to his banking and investments as well as those of his closest family. Several of the special counsel’s prosecutorial hires specialize in money laundering cases—an odd specialty for an election fraud/computer hacking case (which, basically, is what the Russia investigation amounts to). Perhaps, just perhaps, it is that investigation that has motivated the President’s response.

Special counsel Robert Mueller departs Capitol Hill following a closed door meeting in Washington. Mueller’s team of investigators has recently questioned a former British spy who compiled a dossier of allegations about President Donald Trump’s ties to Russia. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)© Catalyst Images Special counsel Robert Mueller departs Capitol Hill following a closed door meeting in Washington. Mueller’s team of investigators has recently questioned a former British spy who compiled a…

 

Donald Trump and Robert Mueller

But even here one should not repose too much hope in the Mueller investigation. Mueller will not indict the president, even for money laundering. The resolution of the current American crisis is going to be political, not criminal. The future lies with Congress and, ultimately, the electorate, not with prosecutors and the courts.      (The Atlantic)

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Melania Trump ‘Missing In Action’ From Davos As Stormy Scandal Brews |RN

Scott Bixby
First lady Melania Trump and U.S. President Donald Trump attend a Hanukkah Reception in the East Room of the White House, December 7, 2017 in Washington, DC. Hanukkah begins on the evening of Tuesday, December 12 this year. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)© Catalyst Images First lady Melania Trump and U.S. President Donald Trump attend a Hanukkah Reception in the East Room of the White House, December 7, 2017 in Washington, DC. Hanukkah begins…

 

In December, first lady Melania Trump told a group of infirm children that her Christmas wish would be to spend her holidays on a “deserted island.” One month later, Trump is one step closer to her dream.

Although the first family’s mansion on the Florida barrier island of Palm Beach, Mar-a-Lago, can hardly be described as deserted, the 110,000-square-foot “winter White House” does have one crucial vacancy: Melania’s husband, President Donald Trump. Although the first lady was originally scheduled to join the president at the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, spokesperson Stephanie Grisham told CNN on Monday that Melania would stay behind due to “scheduling and logistical issues.” CNN reported on Thursday that the first lady’s plane had been spotted in West Palm Beach.

First lady Melania Trump speaks Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, during a "Toys for Tots" event at Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)© Catalyst Images First lady Melania Trump speaks Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, during a “Toys for Tots” event at Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)  

A request for details of the first lady’s apparently unscheduled trip to Florida was not immediately returned by a spokesperson for the East Wing.

Melania, the least-unpopular member of the first family, has kept a reclusive public schedule since Jan. 12, when The Wall Street Journal published a report alleging that in the closing days of the 2016 presidential campaign, President Trump’s personal attorney paid $130,000 in hush money to porn star Stormy Daniels. The payment was made “as part of an agreement that precluded her from publicly discussing an alleged sexual encounter with Mr. Trump,” the Journal reported.

At the time of the alleged payment, Daniels had been in protracted talks with The Daily Beast, among other outlets, to discuss the nature of her relationship with Trump. In a 2011 interview with In Touch released in the wake of the Journal’s story, Daniels went into exhaustive (and, occasionally, exhausting) detail regarding an “ongoing relationship” she had with Trump in 2006, months after Melania had given birth to their son, Barron.

President Donald Trump with first lady Melania Trump waves as he returns to the White House in Washington, Monday, Jan. 15, 2018. Trump spent the holiday weekend at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)© Catalyst Images President Donald Trump with first lady Melania Trump waves as he returns to the White House in Washington, Monday, Jan. 15, 2018. Trump spent the holiday weekend at his Mar-a-Lago estate… 

“If I was his wife and I found out that my husband stuck his dick in a hundred girls, I would be less mad about that than the fact that he went to dinner and had like this ongoing relationship,“ Daniels said in the interview.

President Trump and Daniels have both denied any impropriety, financial or personal, although the latter has capitalized on her newly elevated notoriety with a “Make America Horny Again” strip-club tour.

The first lady has rarely been seen, in public or private, in the two weeks since the Journal story was published. The first couple’s 13th wedding anniversary came and went on Jan. 22 without public mention from either President Trump or Melania; the first anniversary of Trump’s inauguration was marked on Melania’s Instagram account with a post featuring the first lady linking arms not with her husband, but a Marine escort. (Daily Beast)

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Porn Star Allegedly Paid $130,000 For Silence On Trump Affair |The Republican News

DENIS SLATTERY

A former porn star was paid $130,000 by President Trump’s personal lawyer a month before the 2016 election — part of an agreement to keep her quiet about an extramarital affair she had with the President, according to a report Friday.

Attorney Michael Cohen arranged the payment to X-rated actress Stephanie Clifford after her lawyer negotiated a nondisclosure agreement, the Wall Street Journal reported.

Clifford, who made dozens of dirty movies under the name Stormy Daniels, told friends the encounter with Trump took place after they met at a July 2006 celebrity golf tournament in Lake Tahoe, people familiar with the matter told the newspaper.

Another porn star, Alana Evans, told the Daily Beast that Daniels had told her “I ended up with Donald in his hotel room. Picture him chasing me around his hotel room in his tighty-whities.’”

“I was like, ‘Oh I really didn’t need to hear that!’” Evans told the website.

Trump has denied several allegations of sexual misconduct in the past and spokeswoman Hope Hicks said in 2016 that it was “absolutely, unequivocally” untrue that Clifford had a relationship with Trump.

Clifford, 27 at the time of the alleged consensual encounter, has appeared in films including “On Golden Blonde,” “Breast Side Story” and “Good Will Humping.”

Stephanie Clifford, who has made dozens of dirty movies under the name Stormy Daniels, privately alleged the encounter with Trump took place after they met at a July 2006 celebrity golf tournament in Lake Tahoe, people familiar with the matter told the newspaper.© TNS; Albert L. Ortega/Getty Images Stephanie Clifford, who has made dozens of dirty movies under the name Stormy Daniels, privately alleged the encounter with Trump took place after they met at a July 2006…  

“These are old, recycled reports, which were published and strongly denied prior to the election,” a White House official told the Journal on Friday.

Neither Clifford nor her lawyer returned requests for comment from the Daily News.

Cohen, a longtime Trump Organization lawyer, denied anything took place between the President and Clifford and sent a two-paragraph statement by email addressed “TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN” and signed by “Stormy Daniels” denying that she had a “sexual and/or romantic affair” with Trump.

“Rumors that I have received hush money from Donald Trump are completely false,” the statement said.

The report said Clifford, now 38, had complained after signing the agreement that the payment wasn’t coming quickly enough and threatened to can the deal and break her silence.

In 2016, the Journal reported that Clifford was set to appear on ABC’s “Good Morning America” to discuss her relationship with Trump in the wake of the paper’s story alleging the National Enquirer had paid a former Playboy centerfold $150,000 to keep quiet about her affair with Trump.

Trump is longtime friends with David Pecker, the chairman of American Media which owns the National Enquirer.

The Daily Beast reported it had been in talks with Daniels to tell her story, but she abruptly backed out just five days before the election. The site said it had three sources, including Evans, who told them Trump and Daniels had been involved.

The President has denied cheating on his third wife, First Lady Melania Trump, whom he married in 2005. She gave birth to their son Barron just months before the alleged tryst.

The alleged agreement with Clifford came around the same time that a recording of Trump bragging about grabbing women by their genitals was leaked.

Another adult film star, Jessica Drake, alleged that same month that Trump kissed her and two other women without permission in a hotel suite after the same 2006 golf event.

“I did not sign (a nondisclosure agreement), nor have I received any money for coming forward,” Drake told the Journal. “I spoke out because it was the right thing to do.”

Nearly two dozen women have come forward with accusations of sexual assault against Trump.

The women include former adult film stars, a contestant on “The Apprentice,” and several journalists.

The White House has maintained that the allegations are all false.

Trump’s public affair with actress Marla Maples brought about the end of his first marriage to Ivana Trump in 1990.   (New York Daily News)

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Trump Tower In Midtown Manhattan Is On Fire |The Republican News

Alex Lockie

Part of President Donald Trump’s 58-story Midtown Manhattan skyscraper, Trump Tower, caught fire on Monday morning, pictures circulating social media show.

A New York City Fire Department spokesperson said the fire was called in at 6:58 a.m., and that units are on the scene operating, according to CNN’s Kristen Holmes.

                                  © Provided by Business Insider Inc

The fire appears to be contianed to a small penthouse on one of the upper floors. Videos on social media show plumes of smoke rising during the early morning in New York City.

Though Trump’s wife Melania and young son Barron lived in Trump Tower through the first few months of Trump’s presidency, his family moved into the White House in June.

 

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Donald Trump To Undergo Medical Check Amid Swirl of Allegations Over His Health

By Ben Riley-Smith, US Editor
Donald Trump                               © AP Donald Trump

Donald Trump will attempt to end speculation about his mental and physical suitability for the presidency next week by undergoing a formal health check.

The US president is to be examined by the same doctor as his predecessor Barack Obama and a summary of the results will be made public.

The physical test will last around two hours and include blood and urine tests, heart checks and even questions about his sleeping habits and sex life, according to medical experts.

It will be carried out at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on the edge of Washington DC, the country’s largest military hospital, on Friday.

By undergoing his first formal medical check since entering the White House, Mr Trump hopes to put to bed allegations about his mental state that emerged this week.

        Related: Trump Says He’s ‘A Very Stable Genius’ (Provided by: Wotchit)

A controversial new book by journalist Michael Wolff claimed Mr Trump was failing to recognise old friends and often repeated stories “word-for-word” .  The White House called questions about his mental suitability for office“disgraceful”.

However those hoping for a tell-all medical reveal may end up disappointed, according to Arthur Caplan, founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine.

“The president has the same right as any citizen in the United States to keep his medical information private,” he told The Sunday Telegraph. “There’s never been legislation requiring that he does otherwise.”

The examination is merely a custom that has become norm for presidents in recent years, rather than a constitutional or congressional requirement.

Nonetheless Mr Obama, the former president, set the bar of expectation pretty high.  His two-page medical summary released in March 2016 goes into remarkable details.

Mr Obama’s exact height (73.5 inches), weight (175 pounds), body mass index (22.8 kg/m2), resting heart rate (56 bpm) and blood pressure (110/68 mm Hg) are all listed.

Everything from alcohol drinking habits – “occasionally and in moderation” – to his use of nicotine gum and cholesterol levels were spelled out in the official release.

The specificity has raised hopes that some Trump mysteries can finally be solved. Is he really 6 feet 3 inches tall, as the president has claimed despite evidence to the contrary?

Has a diet known to lean towards cheeseburgers and KFC had any impact on the wellbeing of the oldest man ever elected US president?

But the president has the power to hold back any details he wishes – as did Mr Obama, whose clean bill of health came with barely a single negative point.

It will not be the first time Mr Trump, 71, has released medical records. Facing calls for transparency during the 2016 election campaign, the candidate’s personal physician put out a statement .

“Mr Trump has suffered no form of cancer, has never had a hip, knee or shoulder replacement or any other orthopedic surgery,” read a note from Harold N Bornstein, MD.

“If elected, Mr Trump, I can state unequivocally, will be the healthiest individual ever elected to the presidency.”

Reports of how the glowing assessment was procured – written in five minutes while a limo sent by Mr Trump waited outside, according to NBC News – dented its impact.

Dr Bornstein declined to comment on next week’s medical when contacted by this newspaper.

US history is littered with past presidents hiding illnesses.  Grover Cleveland used the cover of a fishing trip to have secret cancer surgery on a yacht in 1893, fearing the impact on the markets if the news got out.

Franklin Roosevelt was said to have hidden the fact he was at “death’s door” when he sought re-election in November 1944. He won, but passed away within six months.

And it is only recently that the full scale of John F Kennedy’s numerous medical problems, and the drugs he used to relieve the pain, have come to light.

The lack of legal requirement for presidents to publish medical examination results has led to calls for the custom to become a rule.

Barbara Perry, the director of Presidential Studies at the University of Virginia’s Miller Center, said: “Having come of age in the Watergate era, I am very keen on transparency in presidents.”

She added: “Just as I want to know the pilot of my airplane is physically and mentally fit for service, the American people have the right to known the condition of their candidates and presidents.”

On Friday, Mr Trump will follow a long line of presidents into the examination room. Critics and supporters alike will be carefully watching the results.   (The Telegragh)

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