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Biden Overturns Trump Ban On Many Green Card Applicants |The Republican News

■Trump-era measure restricting many visa applicants cited need to protect US jobs amid COVID-19 pandemic.

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US President Joe Biden signs an executive order at the White House on February 24, 2021 [Jonathan Ernst/Reuters]

US President Joe Biden has revoked a proclamation issued under the Trump administration that blocked many green card applicants from entering the United States.

The order by former President Donald Trump, known as Presidential Proclamation 100014, cited a need to protect US jobs amid high unemployment rates caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

In a statement on Wednesday, the White House announced that Biden overturned the measure through an executive order, saying Trump’s ban separated families and “does not advance the interests of the United States”.

“To the contrary, it harms the United States, including by preventing certain family members of United States citizens and lawful permanent residents from joining their families here,” the statement reads.

Human rights advocates have been calling on the Biden administration to overturn the measure, which was set to expire on March 31.

“I’m thrilled that Biden has cancelled this proclamation,” Curtis Morrison, an immigration lawyer based in California, told Al Jazeera.

“But I’m also worried,” said Morrison, explaining that the US is currently facing a backlog of hundreds of thousands of visa applicants.

“That backlog may take [Biden’s] entire first term to clear out, unless he is ambitious to doing something to solve that problem.”

Since taking office on January 20, Biden has overturned several of Trump’s anti-immigration policies, including the so-called Muslim ban and a policy that forced asylum seekers to wait in Mexico while their US asylum applications are processed.

But his efforts – including a bill unveiled this month that would create an eight-year pathway to citizenship for 11 million undocumented people who live in the US – are expected to be met with stiff resistance by Republicans in Congress.

SOURCE: AL JAZEERA AND NEWS AGENCIES
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Trump And Giuliani Sued By Democratic Congressman Over Capitol Riot |The Republican News

Former President: Donald Trump

Lawsuit brought by Bennie Thompson and NAACP argues ex-president and lawyer violated law known as Ku Klux Klan Act

By David Smith in Washington
@smithinamerica

Donald Trump and Rudy Giuliani, the former president’s personal lawyer, have been accused of conspiring to incite the violent riot at the US Capitol, in a legal action filed under a historic law known as the Ku Klux Klan Act.

The lawsuit was brought on Tuesday by the Democratic congressman Bennie Thompson of Mississippi and the eminent civil rights organisation the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

It comes three days after Trump was acquitted by the US Senate on a charge of inciting the 6 January insurrection, only for the minority leader, Mitch McConnell, who voted to acquit, to point out that presidents are “not immune” to being held accountable by criminal or civil litigation.

The suit alleges that Trump, Giuliani and the extremist groups the Proud Boys and Oath Keepers conspired to incite the attack on the Capitol with the goal of preventing Congress from certifying Joe Biden’s win in the presidential election.

It argues that they therefore violated a law often referred to as the Ku Klux Klan Act, passed in 1871 in response to Klan violence and intimidation preventing members of Congress in the Reconstruction south from carrying out their constitutional duties. The NAACP, founded in 1909, says the statute was designed to protect against conspiracies.

Joseph Sellers, who is with the Washington law firm Cohen Milstein and filed the lawsuit on Thompson’s behalf, told the Associated Press: “Fortunately, this hasn’t been used very much. But what we see here is so unprecedented that it’s really reminiscent of what gave rise to the enactment of this legislation right after the civil war.”

Thompson, who chairs the House homeland security committee, was among members of Congress who donned gas masks and were rushed to shelter in an office building during the mayhem of 6 January, in which five people died. Members of he Proud Boys and Oath Keepers have been charged with taking part in the riot.

Thompson said in a statement that Trump’s “gleeful support of violent white supremacists led to a breach of the Capitol that put my life, and that of my colleagues, in grave danger. It is by the slimmest of luck that the outcome was not deadlier.

“While the majority of Republicans in the Senate abdicated their responsibility to hold the President accountable, we must hold him accountable for the insurrection that he so blatantly planned. Failure to do so will only invite this type of authoritarianism for the anti-democratic forces on the far right that are so intent on destroying our country.”

Filed on Tuesday in federal district court in Washington, the suit charts an expansive effort by Trump and Giuliani to undermine the election result despite state officials and courts rejecting their false allegations of fraud. The two men portrayed the election as stolen while Trump “endorsed rather than discouraged” threats of violence from his supporters leading up to the attack on the Capitol, the suit says.

“The carefully orchestrated series of events that unfolded at the Save America rally and the storming of the Capitol was no accident or coincidence,” it continues. “It was the intended and foreseeable culmination of a carefully coordinated campaign to interfere with the legal process required to confirm the tally of votes cast in the Electoral College.”

Presidents are typically shielded from the courts for actions carried out in office but this one focuses on Trump in his personal rather than official capacity. Seeking unspecified punitive and compensatory damages, it alleges that none of the conduct at issue is related to Trump’s responsibilities as president.

Sellers explained: “Inciting a riot, or attempting to interfere with the congressional efforts to ratify the results of the election that are commended by the constitution, could not conceivably be within the scope of ordinary responsibilities of the president. In this respect, because of his conduct, he is just like any other private citizen.”

Trump faces a potential slew of lawsuits now he has lost the legal protections of office. Additional actions could be brought by other members of Congress or police officers injured in the riot, a prospect acknowledged by the White House on Tuesday.

Jen Psaki, the press secretary, told reporters Biden “certainly supports the rights of individuals, members of Congress and otherwise, to take steps through the judicial process but I don’t think we have a further comment on it than that”.

She added: “I am not going to speculate on criminal prosecution from the White House podium. The president has committed to having an independent justice department that will make their own decision about the path forward.”

Trump defence lawyers are expected to argue that his speech was protected by the first amendment to the constitution and point out that, in a speech on 6 January, he told supporters to behave “peacefully”.

Jason Miller, a Trump adviser, said in a statement Trump had not organised the rally that preceded the riot and “did not incite or conspire to incite any violence at the Capitol on 6 January”. (The Guardian)

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Donald Trump Acquitted Once Again In Second Impeachment Trial |The Republican News

■ Seven Republican Senators vote with Democrats to convict

■ The Senate found Trump not guilty of inciting insurrection after a majority of Republicans voted against convicting the former president.

45th President of the United States, Donald John Trump

By Dareh Gregorian

The Senate on Saturday voted to acquit former President Donald Trump on a charge of incitement of insurrection largely along party lines, bringing an end to the fourth impeachment trial in U.S. history and the second for Trump.

Only seven Republicans voted to convict Trump for allegedly inciting the deadly Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol, when a mob of pro-Trump supporters tried to disrupt the electoral vote count formalizing Joe Biden’s election win before a joint session of Congress. The final vote was 57 to 43, far short of the 67 votes needed to secure a conviction.

Republican Sens. Richard Burr of North Carolina, Susan Collins of Maine, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania all voted guilty.

The vote means the Senate cannot bar Trump from holding future federal offices.

Moments after the vote concluded, the former president issued a statement praising his legal team and thanking the senators and other members of Congress “who stood proudly for the Constitution we all revere and for the sacred legal principles at the heart of our country.”

With control of the Senate split 50-50, the House managers always had an uphill battle when it came to convincing enough Republicans to cross party lines and convict a former president who is still very popular with a large part of the GOP base.

In his closing argument, House manager Joe Neguse, D-Colo., argued, “The stakes could not be higher. Because the cold, hard truth is that what happened on January 6 can happen again. I fear, like many of you do, that the violence we saw on that terrible day may be just the beginning.”

Lead impeachment manager Jamie Raskin, D-Md., urged the senators to think of the future.

“Senators, this trial, in the final analysis, is not about Donald Trump. The country and the world know who Donald Trump is. This trial is about who we are, who we are,” Raskin said.

Trump lawyer Michael van der Veen, meanwhile, insisted his client did nothing wrong and maintained he was the victim of vengeful Democrats and a biased news media. He called the impeachment proceedings a “charade from beginning to end.”

The managers’ task became more difficult Saturday when Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell announced in an email to his colleagues that he would vote to acquit since Trump was already out of office.

“While a close call, I am persuaded that impeachments are a tool primarily of removal and we therefore lack jurisdiction,” the influential Kentucky Republican wrote in the email, which was obtained by NBC News.

McConnell, who’d rebuffed Democratic efforts to start the trial while Trump was still in office, had condemned Trump’s conduct after the riot and said he’d keep an open mind about voting to convict — something he’d ruled out entirely during Trump’s first impeachment trial last year.

McConnell suggested in the email that Trump could still face other penalties.

“The Constitution makes perfectly clear that Presidential criminal misconduct while in office can be prosecuted after the President has left office, which in my view alleviates the otherwise troubling ‘January exception’ argument raised by the House,” he wrote.

Opening arguments began on Wednesday, with House managers blaming the riot on Trump’s months-long campaign to cast doubt on the 2020 election, and his repeated assertions that the only way he would lose was if the election was “stolen.” They focused on his fiery speech on the morning of the Jan. 6 riot, where he urged his supporters to “fight like hell” — and his refusal to take action after they did.

Trump declined a request from managers to testify at the trial, and refused to even submit a statement for it, facts Raskin urged senators to keep in mind on Saturday.

“I ask any of you, if you were charged with inciting violent insurrection against our country, and you’re falsely accused, would you come and testify? I know I would,” Raskin said.

The trial was the fourth of an impeached president. No president has ever been convicted.

Credits |NBCNews

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President Biden Backs Okonjo-Iweala To Lead WTO |The Republican News

President Joe Biden and Dr Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala


By Kayode Oyero with Agency Report

President Joe Biden’s administration on Friday offered its “strong support” to Nigeria’s Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala to lead the World Trade Organisation, AFP reports.

The move marks another sharp split with former President Donald Trump who paralysed the organisation and opposed the former Nigerian finance minister who was backed by many other countries.

The US Trade Representative in a statement cited her “wealth of knowledge in economics and international diplomacy” and said she had “proven experience managing a large international organization.”

The PUNCH had reported early Friday that South Korean Trade Minister Yoo Myung-hee, Okonjo-Iweala’s sole opponent in the race for the top job, withdrew her bid to lead the WTO leaving the former Nigerian Finance Minister as the only remaining candidate for the job.

Yoo was said made the decision after discussions with the United States and other major nations, and took various issues into account “comprehensively” including the need to revitalize the multilateral organization, according to a statement from Korea’s trade ministry on Friday.

All along the selection process which started mid last year, the 66-year-old former minister had said she remained positive of becoming the first African and first female director-general in the 25-year history of the WTO despite ‘hiccups’.

Okonjo-Iweala serves on Twitter’s board of directors, as chair of the GAVI vaccine alliance as well as a special envoy for the World Health Organisation’s COVID-19 fight. (Punch)

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Twitter And Facebook Lost $51 Billion Of Combined Market Value Since Booting Trump From Their Platforms|RN

Phillip Faraone/Getty Images for WIRED25; Francois Mori/AP

By Ben Winck


Facebook and Twitter have collectively seen $51.2 billion erased from their market caps over the last two trading sessions as investors balk at their banning of President Trump.


Facebook saw $47.6 billion erased from its public valuation, while Twitter’s market cap dropped by $3.5 billion.


Both companies announced last week they would permanently ban the president, saying keeping him on their platforms posed too large a risk of additional violence.
The bans come as Trump faces blowback from the government and corporations for his role in inciting last week’s violent riots at the Capitol.


Facebook and Twitter, the two largest social media platforms to permanently ban President Donald Trump for his role in last week’s Capitol riots, saw $51.2 billion in combined market value erased over the last two trading sessions.


Companies across sectors have responded to the president’s rhetoric in recent days by pausing political donations, making statements decrying his inflammatory remarks, and pulling products with links to right-wing movements. Facebook and Twitter possibly took the biggest retaliatory steps when they indefinitely banned Trump from their platforms on Thursday and Friday, respectively.


Both companies cited the risk of additional violence for their bans, but investors largely balked at the action. Facebook tumbled 4% on Monday and another 2.2% on Tuesday as shareholders dumped the stock, likely fearing the ban could drive users off the platform. By the time markets closed on Tuesday, Facebook’s market cap sat $47.6 billion below its Friday level.

Twitter plunged 6.4% to start the week and dipped another 2.4% as the sell-off continued into Tuesday’s close. The declines saw Twitter’s market cap drop by $3.5 billion.


To be sure, Twitter rose as much as 2.9% on Wednesday while Facebook wavered at its previous closing level. And analysts haven’t lowered the stocks’ median price targets following the bans, signaling the slides were likely knee-jerk reactions that will reverse over time.


Other tech giants responding to last week’s insurrection have fared better through the week. Apple and Google have both climbed slightly since announcing after Friday’s close they would remove right-wing social network Parler from their app stores. Amazon shares are up 1.6% since announcing on Sunday that it kicked Parler off of its web hosting service.


Still, the actions could come back to bite tech companies in the final week of Trump’s presidency. CNN reported on Monday that Trump might retaliate against tech giants for their bans. It’s not yet clear what the president’s actions would look like and if they will materialize before President-elect Joe Biden is inaugurated.

Facebook traded at $251.70 per share as of 10:25 a.m. ET Wednesday, down roughly 8% year-to-date.

Twitter traded at $47.94 per share, down 12% year-to-date.

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Trump Declares State Of Emergency In Washington Ahead Of Biden’s Inauguration |The Republican News

By Olaotan Falade

United States (U.S.) President Donald Trump has declared a state of emergency in Washington D.C..

The declaration came on the heels of a revelation by the police of three plots to attack the Capitol Building ahead of Joe Biden’s inauguration, including the “largest armed protest in American history”.

It also came as the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) alerted its agents to possible uprisings at capitols in 50 states ahead of Inauguration Day, particularly if Trump is removed from office before Biden enters the White House.

Trump’s declaration allows the Department of Homeland Security and Federal Emergency Management Agency to coordinate with local authorities as Democrats had been furiously demanding.

On Monday night, the new chiefs of Capitol Police told House Democrats they were looking into three separate plans, including one described as “the largest armed protest ever to take place on American soil”.

The protesters plan to involve armed rioters encircling the Capitol and blocking Democrats from entering – killing them if necessary – so that Republicans can take command of government.

They also plan another protest in honor of Ashli Babbitt, the USAF veteran who was shot by a police officer as she tried to clamber into the Speaker’s Lobby during the Trump mob’s siege.

“It was pretty overwhelming,” one Democrat told Huffington Post of the police briefing.

The FBI’s internal memo warned of a group which was calling for the ‘storming’ of state, local and Federal Government buildings, as well as court houses if Trump is removed from office.

The bulletin came to light just as Speaker Nancy Pelosi introduced an article of impeachment accusing Trump of incitement to insurrection, five days after the mob of the president’s supporters stormed the Capitol, leaving five people dead in a futile bid to overturn the general election.

More than 6,000 members of the National Guard were deployed to Washington, DC, over the weekend, with dozens of them standing guard over the Capitol during Monday’s proceedings.

Capitol Police told Congress that it was preparing for up to tens of thousands of Trump supporters arriving in the days ahead, including possible violence to take control of the White House and the Supreme Court.

Working alongside their colleagues in the National Guard, the police are said to have told Democrats that they had agreed on rules of engagement in the eventuality of an armed demonstration.

They do not plan to shoot anyone unless fired at first, but they added that there were exceptions to the rule.

The police urged caution on lawmakers about leaking any specifics to the press because Big Tech had so successfully ‘cut off main communications’ that many could now only learn of plans through traditional media.

One member remarked that the Silicon Valley gagging order on Trump’s supporters “might ultimately save lives”.

But as the Capitol Police expressed confidence it was making sufficient plans to combat any violent uprisings, some lawmakers questioned whether this was the case given the lax security last week.

One Democrat told the police chiefs that there was clear evidence that some in the police department could be ‘in league with the insurrectionists who love to carry their guns.’

“You can’t just let them bypass security and walk right up to Biden and Harris at inauguration,” this lawmaker told HuffPost.

A further area of Democrat speculation surrounded whether the Trump administration was preventing federal law enforcement from lending its expertise to the police.

The member told the HuffPost: “I don’t think anyone has confidence that the folks at the Pentagon, that may or may not even be needed for some of this, or the Department of Homeland Security, where we don’t even know who’s in charge, are going to be cooperative.”

The National Park Service said it would close the Washington Monument and other area facilities beginning today and lasting through January 24.

The Pentagon is also reportedly considering sending as many as 13,000 guardsmen to secure the area on Inauguration Day. Prior to last week’s breach, officials had planned to deploy roughly 7,000 guardsmen.

The hardened-up security plans came after the Department of Defence said it was aware of “further possible threats posed by would-be terrorists in the days up to and including Inauguration Day”, Congressman Jason Crow (D – Colorado) said in a statement Sunday after speaking with Secretary of the Army Ryan McCarthy about security preparations.

The Department of Homeland Security is working with the Defense Department, local DC authorities and inauguration officials to sharpen the law enforcement response in the coming days, including by erecting non-scalable fencing and security checkpoints around Capitol Hill.

“Now that it happened people will take it much more seriously,” a senior DHS official told CNN in reference to last week’s violence. “Now, the planners, they are all going to take it much more seriously.”

Federal and local authorities have faced fierce criticism for their perceived failure to crack down on Wednesday’s insurrection despite evidence that they knew it was coming.

Hundreds of people might face federal charges in the wake of last week’s Capitol breach, DC’s acting US attorney said in an interview with NPR over the weekend, saying a massive, 24-hour-a-day hunt was on to identify suspects and bring charges against them.

In the meantime, DC Mayor Muriel Bowser said she is ‘extremely concerned’ about security on Inauguration Day in a letter to acting DHS Secretary Chad Wolf over the weekend. She wrote that the event ‘will require a very different approach to previous inaugurations given the chaos, injury and death experienced at the US Capitol during the insurrection’.

Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris are set to be sworn in on the west front of the U.S. Capitol on January 20.

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Twitter Indefinitely Suspends President Donald Trump To Avoid Inciting Further Violence |The Republican News

President Donald Trump arrives to speak at the “Operation Warp Speed Vaccine Summit” on the White House complex, on Dec. 8, 2020.Evan Vucci / AP

“After close review of recent Tweets from the @realDonaldTrump account and the context around them we have permanently suspended the account due to the risk of further incitement of violence,” Twitter’s official “Safety” account tweeted.

By Ben Collins and Brandy Zadrozny

Twitter permanently suspended President Donald Trump’s account on Friday, citing “the risk of further incitement of violence.”

The president’s account was initially banned for 12 hours on Jan. 6 due to “severe violations of our Civic Integrity policy,” after he used the platform to tweet condemnation against Vice President Mike Pence as his supporters stormed the Capitol.

“After close review of recent Tweets from the @realDonaldTrump account and the context around them we have permanently suspended the account due to the risk of further incitement of violence,” the company said in a tweet.

The company banned the president’s account after years of public pressure and several attempts to limit the reach of his account in recent days. Hundreds of Twitter employees signed a letter urging Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey to ban the president for using the platform to incite violence in the wake of the Capitol siege.

“In the context of horrific events this week, we made it clear on Wednesday that additional violations of the Twitter Rules would potentially result in this very course of action,” Twitter said in a blog post. “Our public interest framework exists to enable the public to hear from elected officials and world leaders directly. It is built on a principle that the people have a right to hold power to account in the open.”

“However, we made it clear going back years that these accounts are not above our rules and cannot use Twitter to incite violence,” the post continued. “We will continue to be transparent around our policies and their enforcement.”

This was the second time in a week Twitter had taken action against the president’s account. Twitter removed three tweets that promoted conspiracy theories about the election and locked Trump’s account on Wednesday, citing “a risk of violence,” after a violent riot at the Capitol. Trump’s official @POTUS account is still active.

In the post, the company cited Trump’s two most recent tweets as an explanation for the removal.

In one, Trump wrote: “The 75,000,000 great American Patriots who voted for me, AMERICA FIRST, and MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN, will have a GIANT VOICE long into the future. They will not be disrespected or treated unfairly in any way, shape or form!!!”

In the next, he tweeted, “To all of those who have asked, I will not be going to the Inauguration on January 20th.”

Taken together, the company determined, they were “likely to inspire others to replicate the violent acts that took place on January 6, 2021, and that there are multiple indicators that they are being received and understood as encouragement to do so.”

The suspension drew immediate praise from Democratic politicians.

“Thank you @twitter for taking this action,” tweeted Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.V. “We must come together as a country to heal and find a common path forward.”

This story is developing. Please check back for updates.

(Ben Collins covers disinformation, extremism and the internet for NBC News.
Brandy Zadrozny is an investigative reporter for NBC News.)

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Court Orders President Donald Trump’s Arrest |The Republican News

A Baghdad court has issued a warrant for the arrest of the President of the United States of America, Donald Trump, as part of its investigation into the killing of a top Iraqi paramilitary commander, Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis.

Al-Muhandis, who was the Deputy Head of Iraq’s largely pro-Iran Hashed al-Shaabi paramilitary network, was killed in the same US drone strike that took out Iranian general Qasem Soleimani at Baghdad airport on January 3 last year.

Trump, who ordered the strike, subsequently boasted that it had taken out “two (men) for the price of one”.

The UN special rapporteur for an extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, Agnes Callamard, has called the twin killings as “arbitrary” and “illegal”.

Iran already issued a warrant for the arrest of Trump in June and asked Interpol to relay it as a so-called red notice to other police forces around the world.

The court for east Baghdad has now issued the warrant for Trump’s arrest under Article 406 of the penal code, which provides for the death penalty in all cases of premeditated murder, the judiciary said.

The court said the preliminary inquiry had been completed but “investigations are continuing to unmask the other culprits in this crime, be they Iraqis or foreigners.”

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BREAKING NEWS: Donald Trump Finally Concedes Defeat, Appeals For Peace, Reconciliation|The Republican News

Donald Trump’s concession speech

By Ike A. Offor

President Donald Trump has finally conceded and announced to cooperate with the transition of power to the President-elect, Joseph Robin Biden. Trump in his live broadcast called for peace and reconciliation though he still maintained that he was calling for protection of democracy. He wants the election processes to sanitise eligibility of voters, via checking the process of voting, those who are allowed to vote.

Trump has since the election maintained that he will not concede because he believed he won the election by a landslide, something that is clear is only in his own head and not reflected in any facts and figures from the election so far.

The link below leads to the live broadcast by President Trump during his concession speech where he called for peace and reconciliation. Many now want him to pay for creating the scenario that led to desecration of the seat of democracy in the United States.

Donald Trump’s concession speech

Following the backlash from the rioters who invaded the Capitol building and the House of Representatives Chamber and offices, especially that of the House Speaker, Nancy Pelosi, many have called for impeachment and resignation of the President.

House Speaker, Nancy Pelosi office invaded

The House Speaker, Nancy Pelosi has called on Vice President, Mike Pence to invoke 45th Amendment, which will lead to impeachment of Trump. Though Mike Pence has maintained that he will not invoke 25th Amendment. Many have also said that there is no need for such process since there is only 13 days left for the inauguration of the President-elect, Joe Biden.

Though, the president claimed in his speech that he called on national guards but evidence points to vice-president for making such call that helped to restore order at the Capitol building.

One Congressman said that every day that Trump remains a president is a grave danger to democracy of the United States. Some have called for his resignation, something many would consider mission impossible judging from the character of a man who refused to accept the election and the outcome irrespective of his unsuccessful legal tussles.

Donald Trump’s concession speech

The good news is that the man has finally conceded and the process of handover will now commence and the fear of any escalation has now subsided. The institutions of the democracy have finally won.

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All Over For Trump As Pence Reads Out Electoral College Votes, Congress Certifies It |The Republican News

Vice President Mike Pence

By Ike A. Offor

The waiting for the actual and final outcome of the United States presidential election is finally over as the Vice President has broken ranks with President Donald Trump to read out the electoral college votes results and the Congress certifies it.

The ball game has come to a total halt for Donald Trump, who has in a subtle manner asked Mike Pence to refuse the electoral college votes and refer it back for re-examination. This has caused many to call out the President for sedition.

Yesterday, Trump in a tweet has called Pence some bad names and it became clear that they are no more on the same page on the issue of election final results and purported election rigging, which has not produced any acceptable evidence whatsoever.

Trump had this to say about Pence in a tweet on Tuesday .

“Mike Pence didn’t have the courage to do what should have been done to protect our Country and our Constitution, giving States a chance to certify a corrected set of facts, not the fraudulent or inaccurate ones which they were asked to previously certify. USA demands the truth!”

The accusations of election rigging has been nothing but verbal but no tangible evidence has been found on ground to warrant successful court proceedings. This has been why almost all the cases have been thrown away in the court.

Mike Pence, House Chaplain and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi

Meanwhile, Pence’s chief of staff accuses Trump of locking him out of White House as was reported by Fox News.

Vice President Mike Pence’s chief of staff Marc Short on Wednesday accused President Trump of revoking his White House access as tensions between Pence and Trump continued to deteriorate. The president publicly and privately lobbied Pence in recent weeks to overturn President-elect Joe Biden’s Electoral College win.

In a precedent move, which may not be nice to the hearing of Donald Trump, Mike Pence condemned the violence and vandalism at the Capitol. The House chaplain during prayer session called it desecration of the House and condemned it in a strong term.

Vice President Mike Pence in addressing a session of the U.S. Senate on Wednesday evening, praised the resilience of American Democracy and condemned the rioters who stormed the Capitol building amidst the effort to certify the Electoral College vote.

Rioter seen occupying the seat of House Speaker

“Today was a dark day in the history of the United States Capitol, but thanks to the swift efforts of U.S. Capitol police, federal, state, and local law enforcement, the violence was quelled, the Capitol is secured, and the people’s work continues,” said Pence after the Senate reconvened for the evening.

Earlier in the day, lawmakers were escorted from the House and Senate chambers after a group of rioters pushed their way into the Capitol building. While it’s unclear how many of them entered, photos show apparent Trump supporters entering an empty Senate chamber, and Capitol security commenced in a stand-off at a barricaded House door. Others entered the offices of lawmakers, and broke windows and Capitol property.

Some rioters climbing the wall of the Capitol before gaining entrance to the House chamber, offices
Capitol police fire teargas at protesters

“We condemn the violence that took place here in the strongest possible terms,” Pence told the Senate in the evening. “We grieve the loss of life in these hallowed halls, as well as the injuries suffered by those who defended our Capitol today, and we will always be grateful to the men and women who stayed at their post to defend this historic place.”

Some of the casualties from the invasion
Some of casualties from the imvasion

“To those who wreaked havoc in our Capitol today: You did not win. Violence never wins. Freedom wins, and this is still the people’s House,” he continued. “As we reconvene in this chamber, the world will again witness the resilience and strength of our democracy, for even in the wake of unprecedented violence and vandalism at this Capitol, the elected representatives of the people of the United States have assembled again, on the very same day, to support and defend the Constitution of the United States.”

House Speaker’s office invaded while her computer email was still open.
Rioters take over the House chamber and snapping photos
Rioter seen stand on the statue of Gerald Ford

The vice president concluded his remarks: “May God bless the United States of America. Let’s get back to work.” He was met with applause from lawmakers in the Senate chamber, who promptly resumed Senate business.

He later read out the electoral college votes and declared the House dissolved, which attracted a big round of applause from the House members.

The question now for President Donald Trump is, where do he go from here, is he going to concede or wait to be escorted out of the White House on the inauguration day?

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