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Angelina Jolie Reveals What Put Strain On Her And Brat Pitt’s Marriage |RN

Antoinette Bueno‍
Angelina Jolie is reflecting on her final movie with Brad Pitt.

The 42-year-old actress recently appeared on The Hollywood Reporter‘s podcast Awards Chatter, where she candidly discussed why she wanted to work with Pitt on their critically panned 2015 film, By the Sea. Jolie says she believed at the time that the film would improve their marriage.

In this May 28, 2014 file photo, Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt arrive at the world premiere of "Maleficent" in Los Angeles.© Matt Sayles/Invision/AP, File In this May 28, 2014 file photo, Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt arrive at the world premiere of “Maleficent” in Los Angeles.

 

“We had met working together and we worked together well,” she explains, referring to meeting on the set of 2005’s Mr. & Mrs. Smith.

“I wanted us to do some serious work together. I thought it would be a good way for us to communicate. In some ways it was, and in some ways we learned some things. But there was a heaviness probably during that situation that carried on and it wasn’t because of the film.”

FILE - In this Jan. 15, 2007 file photo, Brad Pitt, and actress Angelina Jolie arrive for the 64th Annual Golden Globe Awards in Beverly Hills, Calif.© Mark J. Terrill, File/ AP Photo FILE – In this Jan. 15, 2007 file photo, Brad Pitt, and actress Angelina Jolie arrive for the 64th Annual Golden Globe Awards in Beverly Hills, Calif.

Jolie acknowledges that outside factors definitely affected their relationship.

“Over the span of that decade, I did lose my mother,” she points out. “I did have my mastectomy, and I did then have an ovarian cancer scare and have that surgery as well, and other things of course that happened in life that you go through.”

“A piece of art can be something that’s healing or something that’s difficult,” she continues. “I don’t know. I’m glad we did that film because we did explore something together. Whatever it was maybe it didn’t solve certain things, but we did communicate something that needed to be communicated to each other.”

During the interview, Jolie also discusses her famously rocky relationship with her father, actor Jon Voight. Jolie acknowledges that she didn’t feel close to her father growing up, which she explains is part of the reason why she didn’t take his last name, but says they’ve begun a “new” relationship thanks to her kids –16-year-old Maddox, 14-year-old Pax, 12-year-old Zahara, 11-year-old Shiloh and 9-year-old twins Knox and Vivienne.

“Through grandchildren now we’re finding a new relationship and it’s very, very nice,” she shares. “We’ve had some difficulties. Through art is a way we’ve been able to talk. It’s a common language. We don’t really talk politics well.”

In October, Jolie brought daughters Shiloh and Zahara with her to the Los Angeles premiere of The Breadwinner, where they adorably held hands on the red carpet. (ETOnline)

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Divorce Harms Children’s Health For Decades – Study |The Republican News

School children showing thumbs up.

When children live through a contentious divorce or separation by their parents, the fallout appears to harm their health for decades, even into adulthood, researchers said Monday.

The study involved 201 healthy adults who agreed to be quarantined, exposed to a virus that causes the common cold, and monitored for five days.

Those whose parents had separated and had not spoken to each other for years were three times as likely to get sick, compared to those whose parents had separated but had stayed in touch as the children grew.

Previous research has shown that adults whose parents separated during childhood have an increased risk for poorer health.

The latest study showed that this higher risk of illness is due, at least in part, to heightened inflammation in response to a viral infection, the report said.

“Early life stressful experiences do something to our physiology and inflammatory processes that increase the risk for poorer health and chronic illness,” said Michael Murphy, a psychology postdoctoral research associate at Carnegie Mellon University.

“This work is a step forward in our understanding of how family stress during childhood may influence a child’s susceptibility to disease 20-40 years later.”

The study also showed that the adult children of parents who had separated but stayed in touch were no more likely to get sick than the adult children of intact families.

“Our results target the immune system as an important carrier of the long-term negative impact of early family conflict,” said Sheldon Cohen, a co-author and professor of psychology.

“They also suggest that all divorces are not equal, with continued communication between parents buffering deleterious effects of separation on the health trajectories of the children.”

The findings were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a peer-reviewed US journal.  (Punchng.com)

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