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Xenophobia: Fresh Wave Of Attack Looms As Armed South African Youths Hit Streets, Ask Foreigners To Leave

Armed South African youths protesters

A fresh round of violence is currently building up in the streets of Johannesburg, South Africa, as armed protesters are out again, demanding that foreigners should return to where they came from.

According to Sowetan Live, a South African newspaper, the protesters, who carried weapons such as knobkerries, are waiting to be addressed by Mangosuthu Buthelezi, a notable politician and Zulu tribe leader.

This is coming one week after attacks on foreigners sparked reactions across the continent.

Nigeria, Rwanda and Malawi had pulled out of the World Economic Forum which held in South Africa while Zambia cancelled an international friendly match with South Africa over the violence against foreigners.

In reprisal attacks in Nigeria, South African-owned businesses were targetted. An MTN office was burnt down in Ibadan, Oyo state, while another office of the telecoms giant was vandalised in Abuja.

MTN had to shut its offices nationwide. Shoprite outlets were also targetted in Lagos, forcing the company to halt its operations across the country.

The South Africa High Commission in Nigeria also suspended operations.

During an assessment tour of some of the affected places, Babajide Sanwo-Olu, governor of Lagos state, said 5,000 people were currently out of jobs as a result of the reprisal.

The police announced that 125 persons were arrested in connection with the violence while South African authorities said over 400 persons were arrested.

But amid the rift between Nigeria and South Africa, Naledi Pandor, South African minister of foreign affairs, said many Nigerians in her country are involved in drug trafficking. A comment which irked Geoffrey Onyeama, her Nigerian counterpart, who accused her of fuelling xenophobia.

In its report on Sunday, Sowetan Live said the leadership of hostel dwellers in Johannesburg has asked the government to engage the citizens about finding solutions to the clashes with foreign nationals.

Siphiwe Mhlongo, chairman of hostel headmen (izinduna) in Gauteng, was quoted as saying: “We are not happy with how government has tried to resolve the problems that the country is facing. The government must come speak to the people and explain what it is going to do with the foreign nationals who are here illegally.”

He said the residents were angry at jobs being take by foreign nationals, unhappy about drugs and RDP houses being owned by foreigners.

“Everyone who is in South Africa has that feeling that foreign nationals must go back home. But we don’t say foreign nationals must be beaten up; we are the leaders,” he said.

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(Video) Huge Crowds Turn Out For Winnie Madikizela Mandela’s Funeral |RN

Jason Burke Africa correspondent in Soweto

(Provided by Storyful)
Tens of thousands of South Africans filled a stadium in Soweto on Saturday for the funeral service of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, a hero of the anti-apartheid struggle but also one of its most controversial figures.

Shouts of “Long live Comrade Winnie” rang out around the stadium, at the beginning of a powerful and emotional service featuring prayers, tributes and the anthems that sustained those fighting for freedom in South Africa through decades of brutal repression against the racist regime.

Cyril Ramaphosa, who has been president since February, sat next to the two daughters of Madikizela-Mandela and Nelson Mandela, the Nobel prize winner and former president. Representatives from African states and political parties joined many of South Africa’s best-known political and cultural figures to pay tribute.

South African military personnel bring in the coffin at Orlando Stadium in Soweto for the funeral ceremony of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela.© AFP/Getty Images South African military personnel bring in the coffin at Orlando Stadium in Soweto for the funeral ceremony of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela.

The funeral is the highest level that South Africa accords for someone who was not head of state.

Madikizela-Mandela, who was married to Mandela for more than 30 years, had a sometimes negative image abroad that contrasted with a deep and long-lasting popularity in her homeland.

In a tribute at the funeral, her sister Zukiswa Madikizela said “Mam Winnie” was “fearless, courageous and loving”, and proof that women are capable of being revolutionaries and leaders.

Swati Dlamini-Mandela, a granddaughter, said Madikizela-Mandela was “ a proud black African woman who fought for …. the emancipation of her people”.

The stadium is situated little more than a mile from the streets where Madikizela-Mandela lived during the darkest days of apartheid and where she lived until her death.

Thousands have signed a condolence book outside her home on a modest street in the Orlando West neighbourhood. “This is history happening. I couldn’t miss this. I am from Soweto so this is very important to me. I am very proud of her,” said Aloma Thomo, 40.

An African National Congress (ANC) supporter arrives at a memorial service for Winnie Madikizela-Mandela at Orlando Stadium in Johannesburg's Soweto township, South Africa April 11, 2018. Memorials for Winnie Mandela Memorials for Winnie Mandela (Provided by Reuters)

Madikizela-Mandela’s remains will be buried in a cemetery in the north of Johannesburg on Saturday afternoon. Her death has prompted a fierce debate within South Africa between her many admirers and a smaller number of detractors.

Born in the poor Eastern Cape province, Madikizela-Mandela’s childhood was “a blistering inferno of racial hatred”, in the words of British biographer Emma Gilbey.

The young hospital social worker married Mandela shortly before the ANC leader was sentenced to life imprisonment for treason in 1962. During her husband’s 27-year incarceration, Madikizela-Mandela campaigned tirelessly for his release and for the rights of black South Africans, establishing a large personal following.

Tortured and subjected to repeated house arrest, she was kept under surveillance and, in 1977, banished to a remote town in another province.

Madikizela-Mandela said the experience of more than a year in solitary confinement changed her. “What brutalised me so much was that I knew what it is to hate,” she said.

The flag draped coffin carrying the remains of anti-apartheid icon Winnie Madikizela-Mandela arrives for the funeral ceremony in Soweto, South Africa's Orlando stadium Saturday, April 14, 2018. Madikizela-Mandela died April 2, 2018, at the age of 81. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)© AP The flag-draped coffin carrying the remains of anti-apartheid icon Winnie Madikizela-Mandela arrives for the funeral ceremony in Soweto, South Africa’s Orlando stadium Saturday, April 14, 2018…

As the violence of the apartheid authorities reached new intensity, Madikizela-Mandela was drawn into a world of internecine betrayal, reprisals and atrocity. Most notoriously, Madikizela-Mandela was found guilty of ordering the kidnapping of a 14-year-old boy, Stompie Seipei, also known as Stompie Moeketsi, who was beaten and killed by members of her personal bodyguard in 1989.

Within a year, she gave the clenched-fist salute of black power as she walked hand-in-hand with Mandela out of Cape Town’s Victor Verster prison on 11 February 1990.

The end of apartheid marked the start of a string of legal and political troubles. Appearing at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission set up to account for atrocities committed by both sides in the anti-apartheid struggle, Madikizela-Mandela refused to show remorse for abductions and murders carried out in her name.

Madikizela-Mandela separated from her husband in 1992. She was sacked from her ministerial post in 1995 after allegations of corruption and the couple divorced a year later. But her popular appeal remained strong.

FILE - In this Tuesday, Dec. 10, 2013 file photo Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, Nelson Mandela's former wife, listens to speakers during the memorial service for former South African president Nelson Mandela at the FNB Stadium in Soweto near Johannesburg. South African state broadcaster SABC said Monday April 2, 2018, that anti-apartheid activist Winnie Madikizela-Mandela has died. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)© AP FILE-In this Tuesday, Dec. 10, 2013 file photo Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, Nelson Mandela’s former wife, listens to speakers during the memorial service for former South African president Nelson Mandela…

In Soweto she was deeply involved in the community, always finding time to help those in need, neighbours said. “Her doors were open to everybody,” said Angela Msimang, 32, who lived nearby.

At a memorial service in New York on Friday, UN secretary general António Guterres described Madikizela-Mandela as “a strong and fearless woman. She had to fight patriarchy’s definitions of womanhood.”

South African military personnel bring in the coffin at Orlando Stadium in Soweto for the funeral ceremony of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela.

A new memorial outside her Soweto home bears the legend: “‘I am the product of the masses, of my country and the product of my enemy’, 1996, Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, Rest in Peace, Mother of the Nation.”   (The Guardian)

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“This Is Not About Land, It’s About Driving White Farmers Into Extinction – Katie Hopkins

Boer-Afrikaner-farm-murders

White farm murders in South Africa

 

South Africa is a land wrought with heartache.

Vengeance for the Apartheid-era has culminated in an epidemic of reverse racism, farm attacks and murders, and if that were not enough, a new constitutional amendment calling for “land expropriation without compensation.”

That’s a lot of syllables to say:

We are going to take your land and without permission.

The amendment is being pushed by African National Congress (ANC) head Cyril Ramaphosa. The Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) will heed this not so subtle call from the ANC to step up their already blood-thirsty demonstrations, in which they chant:

“Kill the Boer, Kill the white farmer.”

Having spent time with the victims of farm attacks, I can tell you that the torture they and their children have endured is real, and bears lasting scars.

 

Make no mistake, “land expropriation without compensation” means that black gangs — the ones currently carrying out brutal farm attacks — now have political permission to carry out murder and torture.   (RebelSouthAfrica.com)

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“We’re Going To Take That Land, Whether They Like It Or Not” – Ramaphosa

Newly elected ANC President Cyril Ramaphosa has once again emphasised that he will follow through with land expropriation without compensation.

Ramaphosa land
SOWETO, SOUTH AFRICA – DECEMBER 18: New president of the ANC Cyril Ramaphosa during the announcement of new party leadership at the 5th African National Congress (ANC) national conference at the Nasrec Expo Centre on December 18, 2017 in Soweto, South Africa. As ANC delegates‚ supporters of the two presidential candidates were equally confident that their preferred choice will be announced as the new president of the ANC. The race was between Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma and Cyril Ramaphosa‚ the only two nominees for the party’s top position. (Photo by Gallo Images / Alet Pretorius)
On Monday, ANC President Cyril Ramaphosa was joined by the ANC top six and his former rival Nkosazana Dlaimini-Zuma. The party leadership are spending the week paying tribute to former ANC presidents.  After visiting graves in KZN, Ramaphosa addressed members of the media about a few of the ANC’s plans and goals.

With the ANC now turning 106, celebrations and party events will continue to flow across the country. On Sunday, Ramaphosa met Zulu King Goodwill Zwelithini, the king was gifted multiple cattle as a gift from the new president.

Ramaphosa reflected on the visit and once again discussed land expropriation without compensation. Mentioning and addressing the two has been described by some analysts as a good move for Ramaphosa.

While Ramaphosa recently said taking back the land will turn South Africa into the garden of Eden, he has also been adamant that it can be done in a way that does not hurt the economy or food security.

On Monday, Ramaphosa again echoed those calls, together with the insistence that land will be expropriated, regardless of whether “they” like it or not.

“20 years later, indeed we are saying we are taking back the land and giving it back to our people. The commitment made at last year’s conference is a promise that we are going to keep.”

Ramaphosa also again vowed to root out corruption from within the ranks of the ANC. The newly elected ANC president said corruption undermines “the interest of our people as a whole”               (The Southern Africa)

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10 Stages Of Genocide And South Africa Is At Stage 6 |The Republican News

By Aubrey O’Callaghan 
10 stages of GENOCIDE and SA at stage 6 

According to Dr. Stanton, the ten stages of genocide are:

 

1. Classification
This first stage is where a nation is divided into various groups for political reasons. This happened in South Africa under the apartheid regime, but it now also being sustained by the ANC government for their own political agendas.

 

2. Symbolization

The Jews, during Nazi Germany, were forced to wear the yellow Star of David so that they may be easily identified and stigmatized.

Today, in South Africa, the mere skin color and language (Afrikaans) are used as symbols to identify the particular ethnic groups that are being targeted for extermination.

 

3. Discrimination

During the apartheid years, racial discrimination was very intense, especially against blacks, coloreds and Indians.

Our South African society was much divided.

When the ANC was elected to power, promises were made to unite South Africa into one rainbow nation.

Our country is much more divided than before; apartheid laws are no longer on the statute book, but the nation remains deeply divided.

The unwise application of affirmative action is driving all our ‘born free’children to foreign Western and Asian countries to look for jobs and better prospects.

Thousands of our best young people (highly qualified) have left South Africa and are working in the UK, USA, Australia, New Zealand, Dubai, Qatar, Kuwait, the UAE and several other countries where the prospects are much better.

And that is why South Africa is suffering from an acute skills shortage and a brain drain.

 

4. Dehumanization

The early signs of the dehumanization of white South Africans are clearly visible in South Africa.

Many black politicians like Jacob Zuma and Julius Malema are referring to white citizens as ‘settlers’ or ‘colonialists’‘racists’, and many other negative words.

Anytime you are making these racial distinctions, you are dividing the humanity of the human race.

 

5. Organization

In South Africa, there are several radical, Marxist, black groups like the EFF and BLF that are being trained ideologically to hate whites, who are being labeled as ‘settlers’‘colonialists’‘racists’ and ‘counter-revolutionaries’.

This is exactly what the Hutus did to the Tutsis before the genocide; they labeled the Tutsis as ‘cockroaches’ and ‘vermin’ that needed to be exterminated in order to ‘save’ Rwanda.

 

6. Polarization

South Africa can be classified as a polarised society.

The dream of Nelson Mandela to build one united rainbow nation has been destroyed by incompetent and short-sighted political leaders like Jacob Zuma.

7. Preparation

As a society, South Africa is at this critical stage where radical, political groups like the EFF, BLF, and others, are meticulously planning the removal of white farmers from their farms in the name of ‘land redistribution’ and ‘taking back their land.

This, of course, is a pretext for violence, murder, and theft in the name of ‘freedom’ and ‘liberation’.

Singing ‘freedom’ songs like ‘Kill (kiss) the Boer, kill (kiss) the farmer’glorifies the killing of white people in South Africa.

Supporters of the EFF are encouraged to literally kill white South Africans in the name of ‘liberation’.

Mob psychology is used to instigate violence against white Afrikaans speaking farmers.

8. Persecution

The persecution of white, colored, Indian and foreign Africans have begun in our motherland by radical, black political groups like the EFF.

Whites are told to go back to Europe, Indians are told to go back to India, and foreign blacks (who are labeled as makwere kwere) are beaten and told to go back to their northern African countries.

The discrimination of foreign blacks by South African blacks are very severe and the intolerance is growing daily.

9. Extermination

The farm murders that are taking place in South Africa are meticulously planned by radically politicized groups to rid the country of white farmers under the pretext of ‘taking back the stolen land.’

The brutality of farm murders in our country is shocking.

Often, nothing is stolen and it becomes clear that many of these crimes are hate crimes, perpetrated by people who have been incited to commit murder.

It does not matter if many farmers have bought their land legally after 1994, the lie is still propagated that they stole the land from blacks.

The Marxist ideal is to take away all private ownership and to allow the state to own all the land.

This was done in Zimbabwe as well.

It also resulted in Robert Mugabe owning 13 farms personally, all ‘liberated’ from white farmers by ZANU-PF members.

Julius Malema does not have any original ideas; his political ideas are all stolen from failed Marxist despots who left their countries in ruins.

There is a clear political agenda to promote these populist views amongst uninformed, poor, black people mainly living in townships, in order to gain more votes in the 2019 national elections.

They are misled to believe that they will get previously white-owned land and farms if they vote for the EFF or ANC!

Of course, all blatant lies told by (once poor) politicians who once lived in RDP houses, but now drive in their expensive cars, dressed in designer clothing, living in multi-million rand mansions, sipping their twelve-year-old single malt whiskeys, having regular, expensive holidays in Dubai funded by corrupt businessmen thriving on multi-billion rand government tenders so generously given by our South African government.

10. Denial.

Our present government is denying that farm murders are being pre-planned by organized, politically connected groups.

The SAPS are also not keeping statistics of farm murders as a special crime.

The message the general public is getting is that the state do not want to know the truth about farm murders in South Africa, hence the need for other civil society organizations to keep a daily record of farm killings and attacks.

It is the opinion of MANY SOUTH AFRICANS that the new president of the ANC, Cyril Ramaphosa needs to answer the question.        (Uncaptured SA)

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