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Church Vigil Linked To Teenage Pregnancy, Town Bans It

Church-night-vigil

A Kenyan town, Narok County, has banned churches from holding vigils as authorities say churches are to blame for the rising statistics of early pregnancies among teenagers in the area.

The County Commissioner, George Natembeya, issued the ban on night prayers after linking them to early motherhood. He told Citizen TV that in March 2018, 17 girls from Suswa Girls Secondary School in Narok County were found to be pregnant. The same town, in 2004 suspended street preaching unless sanctioned by police.

Natembeya’s directive has led to mixed reactions from the people, while some believe the government was right to protect young girls,  others felt the directive infringed on their right to worship.

Samuel Nganga, a resident of Nairobi said: “This is ridiculous, I don’t understand how prayers at night can be related to immorality, I think the county commissioner has done no research. Do not provoke God in Narok, it might just bounce back on you. Don’t try.”

“Narok Pastors kindly plan a ‘Kesha’ (popular word used to refer to night prayers) at the Narok stadium and invite the county commissioner. This is one of the many ways of fighting Christ, but GOD is able in fighting his wars, have an eye on this, the one who banned ‘Kesha’ prayers will not be the one to uplift the ban,” Nicholas Muendo, a resident of Machakos who spoke with Uganda Christian News.

James Ndiga said, “I started attending night prayers in my teens and have never heard people getting babies in the morning, the only place Kenyans feel more secure is in the church.

This is the second country in Kenya to announce such a ban. In 2014, Police in Malindi, a town on Malindi Bay, in southeastern Kenya banned night prayers purporting they had become avenues for extortion, according to Daily Nation.  (Punch)

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Man Finds Suspected Thieves Are Police Officers As He Went To Report |RN

Kenyan-police

Kenyan Police

A Kenyan man, Jervason Musinga Kiendi, 33, who went to a police station to report a case of robbery was shocked to see the robbers behind the police reporting desk.

Kiendi accused the three policemen, who were in a saloon car of seizing him moments after he withdrew cash from a bank in Machakos town on Friday.

Kiendi, 33, said they robbed him of Sh390,000 (N139,978) and dumped him in a bush in Konza.

However, when he went to Machakos Police Station to report the incident, Kiendi claimed he found two of his attackers at the station, and they refused to record his statement.

He returned to the police station the next day and found the third man he claimed was part of the gang that robbed him manning the reporting desk. The policeman allegedly kept him waiting in the reports office.

He then went to Salama Police Station in Makueni County where he made the report.

In the statement he made in Salama, Kiendi said he withdrew Sh400,000 from Equity Bank in Machakos around midday on Friday and immediately spent Sh10,000. Later, as he walked from the bank to the local referral hospital, a saloon car with three male occupants stopped at the hospital gate. The men bundled him into the car, threatened to shoot him and took him to the Machakos-Konza road, where they dumped him after robbing him of the money.

Kiendi told police a good Samaritan offered him a lift from the robbery scene to Machakos Police Station. “He says he found two of the men who robbed him of the money at the office where he went to report in civilian clothes. He alleges he tried to make a report on the incident but was told to wait outside until late in the evening,” said an officer aware of the matter.

Machakos County police boss, Samuel Mukinda, said they had opened investigations into the claims. “We intend to visit the bank to confirm if he withdrew the money and conduct a thorough probe before we establish a way forward,” said Mr Mukinda.

He added that the victim’s allegations were serious and would be handled seriously. (Punch)

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Paul Kagame Closes 6000 Churches, Mosques In Rwanda |The Republican News

 

 

Rwanda’s government has closed thousands of churches and dozens of mosques as it seeks to assert more control over a vibrant religious community whose sometimes makeshift operations, authorities say, have threatened the lives of followers.

President Paul Kagame has said he was shocked by the high number of churches in this small East African country. “700 churches in Kigali?” he said of houses of worship in the nation’s capital in March. “Are these boreholes (deep wells) that give people water? I don’t think we have as many boreholes. Do we even have as many factories? This has been a mess!”

Kagame said Rwanda doesn’t need so many houses of worship, claiming that such a high number is only fit for bigger, more developed economies that have the means to sustain them.

The closings are bringing mixed reactions in Rwanda, where human rights groups have long accused Kagame’s government of clamping down on freedom of expression, which the president has denied. Six Pentecostal pastors who protested the church closures were arrested and accused of “illegal meetings with bad intentions,” and since then other critics have refused to discuss the issue with The Associated Press.

While Rwanda’s government describes the closures as tackling churches that have failed to comply with building safety standards, it is taking other steps to oversee the religious community in the largely Christian nation of 12 million people.

Proposed legislation aims to regulate faith-based organisations separately from civil society organizations, said Alexis Nkurunziza, president of the private Rwanda Religious Leaders Forum. Suggestions from religious leaders soon will be forwarded to the Rwanda Law Reform Commission for scrutiny and later to parliament, he said. The legislation is expected to be passed as the ruling party holds a majority of parliamentary seats.

The new legislation would require pastors to have a theology degree before they start their own churches so that they teach correct doctrine, said those familiar with the discussions. The aim is to regulate the Pentecostal churches that often spring up under leaders who claim to have received a call to preach. Not everyone, however, has the money to such a degree, some observers have said.

The majority of churches that have been closed are said to be small Pentecostal prayer houses, with some preachers suspected of growing rich off often impoverished followers. Some churches meet in tents or houses that cannot accommodate crowds and noise pollution from nighttime gatherings is a concern, authorities said.

“The prayer houses were found in such poor physical conditions, and we are not targeting any religion,” Anastase Shyaka, the head of the Rwanda Governance Board that regulates faith-based organizations, told the AP. “We are closing prayer houses of all different denominations and asking them to meet existing health and safety standards for their followers.”

Local media in the capital have reported that over 6 000 churches have been closed so far across the country, but Shaka said the actual number was still being compiled.            (Times Africa)

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Ex-President Zuma, 76 To Marry Lady, 24, As Seventh Wife |The Republican News

Jacob-Zuma'-Nonkanyiso-Conco
                     Zuma’s bride, Nonkanyiso Conco

Seventy-six-year-old former president of South Africa, Jacob Zuma, is set to marry for the seventh time.

His bride-to-be is 24-year-old Nonkanyiso Conco, who confirmed to TimesLIVE that she and the embattled former president are set to wed.

“Yes‚ we are getting married‚ but that is all I can say. I need to consult before I give any interviews‚” she told the South African website.

Conco is a director of the Pietermaritzburg-based Nomkhubulwane Culture and Youth Development Organisation‚ aimed at protecting the cultural practices of young Zulu women.

Conco reportedly resides in the plush Ballito Estate Hilltop‚ home to some of the city’s most well-heeled residents. She would be Zuma’s youngest bride‚ at 52 years his junior.

Zuma‚ who has always been a proponent of polygamy‚ is currently married to Gertrude Sizakele Khumalo‚ Thobeka Madiba-Zuma and Bongi Ngema-Zuma.

He is divorced from Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma and separated from Nompumelelo MaNtuli Zuma.  (Punch)

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(Video) Huge Crowds Turn Out For Winnie Madikizela Mandela’s Funeral |RN

Jason Burke Africa correspondent in Soweto
(Provided by Storyful)
Tens of thousands of South Africans filled a stadium in Soweto on Saturday for the funeral service of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, a hero of the anti-apartheid struggle but also one of its most controversial figures.

Shouts of “Long live Comrade Winnie” rang out around the stadium, at the beginning of a powerful and emotional service featuring prayers, tributes and the anthems that sustained those fighting for freedom in South Africa through decades of brutal repression against the racist regime.

Cyril Ramaphosa, who has been president since February, sat next to the two daughters of Madikizela-Mandela and Nelson Mandela, the Nobel prize winner and former president. Representatives from African states and political parties joined many of South Africa’s best-known political and cultural figures to pay tribute.

South African military personnel bring in the coffin at Orlando Stadium in Soweto for the funeral ceremony of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela.© AFP/Getty Images South African military personnel bring in the coffin at Orlando Stadium in Soweto for the funeral ceremony of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela.

The funeral is the highest level that South Africa accords for someone who was not head of state.

Madikizela-Mandela, who was married to Mandela for more than 30 years, had a sometimes negative image abroad that contrasted with a deep and long-lasting popularity in her homeland.

In a tribute at the funeral, her sister Zukiswa Madikizela said “Mam Winnie” was “fearless, courageous and loving”, and proof that women are capable of being revolutionaries and leaders.

Swati Dlamini-Mandela, a granddaughter, said Madikizela-Mandela was “ a proud black African woman who fought for …. the emancipation of her people”.

The stadium is situated little more than a mile from the streets where Madikizela-Mandela lived during the darkest days of apartheid and where she lived until her death.

Thousands have signed a condolence book outside her home on a modest street in the Orlando West neighbourhood. “This is history happening. I couldn’t miss this. I am from Soweto so this is very important to me. I am very proud of her,” said Aloma Thomo, 40.

An African National Congress (ANC) supporter arrives at a memorial service for Winnie Madikizela-Mandela at Orlando Stadium in Johannesburg's Soweto township, South Africa April 11, 2018. Memorials for Winnie Mandela Memorials for Winnie Mandela (Provided by Reuters)

Madikizela-Mandela’s remains will be buried in a cemetery in the north of Johannesburg on Saturday afternoon. Her death has prompted a fierce debate within South Africa between her many admirers and a smaller number of detractors.

Born in the poor Eastern Cape province, Madikizela-Mandela’s childhood was “a blistering inferno of racial hatred”, in the words of British biographer Emma Gilbey.

The young hospital social worker married Mandela shortly before the ANC leader was sentenced to life imprisonment for treason in 1962. During her husband’s 27-year incarceration, Madikizela-Mandela campaigned tirelessly for his release and for the rights of black South Africans, establishing a large personal following.

Tortured and subjected to repeated house arrest, she was kept under surveillance and, in 1977, banished to a remote town in another province.

Madikizela-Mandela said the experience of more than a year in solitary confinement changed her. “What brutalised me so much was that I knew what it is to hate,” she said.

The flag draped coffin carrying the remains of anti-apartheid icon Winnie Madikizela-Mandela arrives for the funeral ceremony in Soweto, South Africa's Orlando stadium Saturday, April 14, 2018. Madikizela-Mandela died April 2, 2018, at the age of 81. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)© AP The flag-draped coffin carrying the remains of anti-apartheid icon Winnie Madikizela-Mandela arrives for the funeral ceremony in Soweto, South Africa’s Orlando stadium Saturday, April 14, 2018…

As the violence of the apartheid authorities reached new intensity, Madikizela-Mandela was drawn into a world of internecine betrayal, reprisals and atrocity. Most notoriously, Madikizela-Mandela was found guilty of ordering the kidnapping of a 14-year-old boy, Stompie Seipei, also known as Stompie Moeketsi, who was beaten and killed by members of her personal bodyguard in 1989.

Within a year, she gave the clenched-fist salute of black power as she walked hand-in-hand with Mandela out of Cape Town’s Victor Verster prison on 11 February 1990.

The end of apartheid marked the start of a string of legal and political troubles. Appearing at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission set up to account for atrocities committed by both sides in the anti-apartheid struggle, Madikizela-Mandela refused to show remorse for abductions and murders carried out in her name.

Madikizela-Mandela separated from her husband in 1992. She was sacked from her ministerial post in 1995 after allegations of corruption and the couple divorced a year later. But her popular appeal remained strong.

FILE - In this Tuesday, Dec. 10, 2013 file photo Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, Nelson Mandela's former wife, listens to speakers during the memorial service for former South African president Nelson Mandela at the FNB Stadium in Soweto near Johannesburg. South African state broadcaster SABC said Monday April 2, 2018, that anti-apartheid activist Winnie Madikizela-Mandela has died. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)© AP FILE-In this Tuesday, Dec. 10, 2013 file photo Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, Nelson Mandela’s former wife, listens to speakers during the memorial service for former South African president Nelson Mandela…

In Soweto she was deeply involved in the community, always finding time to help those in need, neighbours said. “Her doors were open to everybody,” said Angela Msimang, 32, who lived nearby.

At a memorial service in New York on Friday, UN secretary general António Guterres described Madikizela-Mandela as “a strong and fearless woman. She had to fight patriarchy’s definitions of womanhood.”

South African military personnel bring in the coffin at Orlando Stadium in Soweto for the funeral ceremony of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela.

A new memorial outside her Soweto home bears the legend: “‘I am the product of the masses, of my country and the product of my enemy’, 1996, Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, Rest in Peace, Mother of the Nation.”   (The Guardian)

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Woman Infected With HIV By Boss, Sacked Now Loses Case In Court |RN

blackwoman

A receptionist who accused her boss of infecting her with HIV and then sacking her has lost the 14-year court battle.

The woman told Kenya’s Employment and Labour Relations Court that she had a long-running affair with the man.

She said they met in September 2000 when both were employed at the man’s family business. Her lover was a supervisor in the firm.
The woman was fired in November of the same year on claims she was disrespectful to the managing director.

Later, the man, too, left the family business to set up his own company. He hired his lover as a receptionist and they continued their affair, according to court papers.

The woman said she had been tested before the affair and she was HIV-negative, but after their relationship, she was tested positive.

She claimed her lover became hostile when she broke the news to him. There were multiple claims of assault by both sides. The woman filed a case alleging unfair dismissal in 2004.

Last Thursday, the court threw out her case, with the judge terming it a case of sour grapes.

Justice Nduma Nderi found that the woman, named as BO to protect her identity, worked as a receptionist but did not prove her case against the man.

The judge, however, determined that the case before him was more than an employment case as it involved an affair between the two.

“What is without a doubt is that there was an emotional relationship between the plaintiff and the respondent which may not be fully explained by their having worked together for two different companies.

“The many criminal complaints by each of them against the other is a pointer to this untoward relationship. It is difficult to tell if any cause of action that may have arisen from this relationship falls or not within the jurisdiction of this court,” Nduma ruled.

(Sde)

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Belgian Student Association Protest Against Farm Murders In South Africa (Video) |RN

by Denis Bolosky

Farm-murders-in-South-Africa

Members of the Belgian Nationalist Student Association have organized a rally in Ghent against what they call the genocide of white farmers in South Africa. Over the past few years, there’s been an increase in murders and attacks on farmers, although neither the authorities nor mainstream media have viewed these attacks as being racially-motivated.

The march was attended by South African students and politicians, who arrived in Belgium to share the problems of their community with Belgians – citizens of the country, which many members of the South African Boer minority consider the land of their forefathers. Sputnik sat down with Pieter Groenewald – the leader of South Africa’s conservative Freedom Front Plus to talk about these issues.

Sputnik: As a representative of the Boer minority in South Africa, do you feel support from Belgians?

Pieter Groenewald: The people in South Africa, they feel in a certain sense that they sometimes stand alone. And events like this – especially when it comes to farm murders, is really big moral support for the people of South Africa, specifically for the farmers, who know that there are other people, specifically in Belgium, that also support them in trying to get the government to realize that farm murders in South Africa, and the brutality is totally unacceptable – not only in South Africa, but also all over the world, and specifically in Belgium.

 

Sputnik: Is there any reaction to farm murders from the government and mass media in South Africa?

Pieter Groenewald: They are quite aware of the problem. But the government of today, they only see it as normal criminality. They don’t want to see it as a specific crime, as far as the farmers are concerned, and I say it is not normal criminality, because, I mean, it cannot be just normal criminality if the perpetrators come at 9 o’clock in the morning, the farmer and his wife went to church, they, visit their friends, and when they return at 3 o’clock – they kill them. It is not just normal criminality, if they torture the victims, using electric drills, drilling through women’s legs and feet, and also if they rape the women. So, it is not normal criminality. We say that there is a political element, and it is also linked to the land, because the land issue in South Africa is becoming more prominent, and it is central for our general election next year – 2019.

Sputnik: What are the ways to deal with this problem? Is there a political solution?

Pieter Groenewald: Well, first, what has to be done is, political leaders in South Africa must stop saying that the land in South Africa has been stolen by white people. By that, they are creating a specific climate, where the masses and the majority of black people think that we are a group of thieves just because we’re white. Even president Zuma in 2016 said at the anniversary of the governing party that “you, you – masses are poor because you don’t have land, and you are unemployed because you don’t have land, and there is inequality in South Africa because you don’t have land, and we know who has stolen the land.” – I mean, you’re creating an atmosphere. So, political leaders must lead in a responsible way, to say that “we cannot allow them to say that white people are actually criminals,” because if you say that they have stolen the land, you’re actually calling them criminals. Secondly, the government must realize that these crimes against the farmers are not a normal crime, it’s not normal criminality, as I said. And we say that they should come forward with specialized units to combat these specific crimes in the rural areas because you need special units who understand what’s happening as far as the farmer is concerned, and if you do these three things – it will improve the situation.

 

Sputnik: South Africa is hosting the BRICS summit this summer. Do you see such events as a chance to attract international attention to the problems of the country’s minorities? 

Pieter Groenewald: I appeal to the world: please, also raise your voice against this atrocity which is actually taking place in South Africa regarding farm murders. By doing that you’re putting pressure on the South African government. And even the government hears from all over the world “listen, we’re not going to invest in South Africa because you don’t intend to do anything as far as farm murders are concerned.” By doing that they would start forcing the South African government to, for instance, understand that it’s not a normal crime, and to stop all the hate speech, because, that’s nothing else but hate speech by political leaders.   (Sputnik)

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