Image

Man Catches Wife In Matrimonial Bed With His Younger Brother |RN

Africanmanandwoman

 

A 33-year-old Mason, Azizi Busara has caught his wife, Heshima on their matrimonial bed with his younger brother, Chagina.

The incident took place in Koita village, Kiplabotwa in Kenya.

Azizi arrived home unexpectedly only to find his 27-year-old wife fondling his younger brother in bed.

The Standard Kenya reports that the man had left home early in the morning, and gone to work at a construction site which is not very far from his house.

On getting to the site, the owner of the building under construction had not purchased cement and other materials that had run out the previous day and therefore dismissed the labourers.

Azizi was said to have returned home and found the door partially closed.

He tip-toed in and saw his younger brother engaged in an act of intimacy with his wife.

He told the newspaper, “The two lovebirds did not hear me walk in since they were totally immersed in their romantic bliss.

“I stood there in a trance not really believing that the two had decided to betray my trust in them.

“After I recovered, I picked my chebunyo (club) and hit my brother very hard in the back.

“The young man ran towards his home which is across the ridge while my wife fled to her parent’s home which is less than two kilometres from my house.”

As the news spread across the village, Azizi out of embarrassment, sent a message to his in-laws, asking that his wife should never return to his home again. (DailyPost)

http://www.twitter.com/RNNetwork1

Continue reading

Image

China Establishes First Military Base Overseas To Djibouti Military Base

Ships carrying personnel for China’s first overseas military base, in Djibouti in the Horn of Africa, have set sail to begin setting up the facility, as China’s rapidly modernising military extends its global reach.

Djibouti’s position on the northwestern edge of the Indian Ocean has fuelled worry in India that it would become another of China’s “string of pearls” of military alliances and assets ringing India, including Bangladesh, Myanmar and Sri Lanka.

China began construction of a logistics base in Djibouti last year. It will be used to resupply Navy ships taking part in peacekeeping and humanitarian missions off the coasts of Yemen and Somalia, in particular.

It will be China’s first overseas naval base, though Beijing officially describes it as a logistics facility.

State news agency Xinhua said late on Tuesday the ships had departed from Zhanjiang in southern China “to set up a support base in Djibouti”.

Navy commander Shen Jinlong “read an order on constructing the base in Djibouti”, but the news agency did not say when the base would begin operations.

Xinhua said the establishment of the base was a decision made by the two countries after “friendly negotiations and accords with the common interest of the people from both sides”.

“The base will ensure China’s performance of missions, such as escorting, peace-keeping and humanitarian aid in Africa and West Asia,” it said.

“The base will also be conducive to overseas tasks including military cooperation, joint exercises, evacuating and protecting overseas Chinese and emergency rescue, as well as jointly maintaining the security of international strategic seaways,” Xinhua said.

Foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang told a daily news briefing the base would enable China to make “new and greater contributions” to peace in Africa and the world and would benefit Djibouti’s economic development.

Djibouti, which is about the size of Wales, is at the southern entrance to the Red Sea on the route to the Suez Canal. The tiny, barren nation sandwiched between Ethiopia, Eritrea and Somalia also host U.S., Japanese and French bases.

(Source: Today)

Continue reading

Image

Africa Is Not Poor, We Are Stealing Its Wealth |The Republican News

It’s time to change the way we talk and think about Africa.

 Our climate crisis was not caused by Africa, but Africans will feel the effect more than most others, writes Dearden [Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters]Our climate crisis was not caused by Africa, but Africans will feel the effect more than most others, writes Dearden [Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters]

by Nick Dearden

Nick Dearden is the director of UK campaigning organisation Global Justice Now.

Africa is poor, but we can try to help its people.

It’s a simple statement, repeated through a thousand images, newspaper stories and charity appeals each year, so that it takes on the weight of truth. When we read it, we reinforce assumptions and stories about Africa that we’ve heard throughout our lives. We reconfirm our image of Africa.

 

That’s the essence of a report (pdf) from several campaign groups released today. Based on a set of new figures, it finds that sub-Saharan Africa is a net creditor to the rest of the world to the tune of more than $41bn. Sure, there’s money going in: around $161bn a year in the form of loans, remittances (those working outside Africa and sending money back home), and aid.

But there’s also $203bn leaving the continent. Some of this is direct, such as $68bn in mainly dodged taxes. Essentially multinational corporations “steal” much of this – legally – by pretending they are really generating their wealth in tax havens. These so-called “illicit financial flows” amount to around 6.1 per cent of the continent’s entire gross domestic product (GDP) – or three times what Africa receives in aid.

Then there’s the $30bn that these corporations “repatriate” – profits they make in Africa but send back to their home country, or elsewhere, to enjoy their wealth. The City of London is awash with profits extracted from the land and labour of Africa.

OPINION: Africa’s natural resources – From curse to a blessing

There are also more indirect means by which we pull wealth out of Africa. Today’s report estimates that $29bn a year is being stolen from Africa in illegal logging, fishing and trade in wildlife. $36bn is owed to Africa as a result of the damage that climate changewill cause to their societies and economies as they are unable to use fossil fuels to develop in the way that Europe did. Our climate crisis was not caused by Africa, but Africans will feel the effect more than most others. Needless to say, the funds are not currently forthcoming.

If African countries are to benefit from foreign investment, they must be allowed to – even helped to – legally regulate that investment and the corporations that often bring it.

In fact, even this assessment is enormously generous, because it assumes that all of the wealth flowing into Africa is benefitting the people of that continent. But loans to governments and the private sector (at more than $50bn) can turn into unpayable and odious debt.

Ghana is losing 30 per cent of its government revenue to debt repayments, paying loans which were often made speculatively, based on high commodity prices, and carrying whopping rates of interest. One particularly odious aluminium smelter in Mozambique, built with loans and aid money, is currently costing the country £21 for every £1 that the Mozambique government received. British aid, which is used to set up private schools and health centres, can undermine the creation of decent public services, which is why such private schools are being closed down in Uganda and Kenya. Of course, some Africans have benefitted from this economy. There are now around 165,000 very rich Africans, with combined holdings of $860bn. But, given the way the economy works, where do these people mainly keep their wealth? In tax havens. A 2014 estimate suggests that rich Africans were holding a massive $500bn in tax havens. Africa’s people are effectively robbed of wealth by an economy that enables a tiny minority of Africans to get rich by allowing wealth to flow out of Africa.

So what is the answer? Western governments would like to be seen as generous beneficiaries, doing what they can to “help those unable to help themselves”. But the first task is to stop perpetuating the harm they are doing. Governments need to stop forcing African governments to open up their economy to privatisation, and their markets to unfair competition.

OPINION: Investment in Africa – There’s room for everyone

If African countries are to benefit from foreign investment, they must be allowed to – even helped to – legally regulate that investment and the corporations that often bring it. And they might want to think about not putting their faith in the extractives sector. With few exceptions, countries with abundant mineral wealth experience poorer democracy, weaker economic growth, and worse development. To prevent tax dodging, governments must stop prevaricating on action to address tax havens. No country should tolerate companies with subsidiaries based in tax havens operating in their country.

Aid is tiny, and the very least it can do, if spent well, is to return some of Africa’s looted wealth. We should see it both as a form of reparations and redistribution, just as the tax system allows us to redistribute wealth from the richest to the poorest within individual societies. The same should be expected from the global “society”.

To even begin to embark on such an ambitious programme, we must change the way we talk and think about Africa. It’s not about making people feel guilty, but correctly diagnosing a problem in order to provide a solution. We are not, currently, “helping” Africa. Africa is rich. Let’s stop making it poorer.

Nick Dearden is the director of UK campaigning organisation Global Justice Now. He was previously the director of Jubilee Debt Campaign.

The views expressed in this article are the author’s own

Source: Al Jezeera

http://www.twitter.com/RNNetwork1

Continue reading

Image

From West Africa To Baltimore: A Ghanaian Long Path To Education For A Hopkins Star

 

Tim Prudente
George Mwinnyaa                               © Amy Davis/Baltimore Sun/TNS George Mwinnyaa

 

The remote bushlands of West Africa are far from Johns Hopkins University, and the path was neither sure nor straight for the boy whose name meant “beloved by his ancestors.” They called him Kpimenongme Mwinnyaa.

Only now, as he prepares to graduate – having been baptized George, having earned semester after semester of straight A’s despite grades once too poor for college – does he dare believe it’s more than a dream.

George Mwinnyaa, 29, will receive a bachelor’s degree in public health with academic honors during Hopkins’ commencement Wednesday.

Mwinnyaa, who is from Ghana, says he slips on a woven African smock each morning to remember where his path began.

“If you don’t know where you come from, you will not know where you are going,” he says.

He comes from a remote village in Nandom-Guo, where a cobra bite kills fast and cholera even faster. Polygamy was the custom and his father had seven wives and 32 children. George was the youngest of them all. He was about five years old when his father died and his widowed mother was left to raise seven children. A slight woman, she held off starvation with her wits, boiling hot peppers into soup. A few spoonfuls would cause George to gulp water to ease his hunger.

Each morning he woke before sunrise to fetch water from the river and hoe the dry plot that never grew enough beans. Then he walked a path through the bush to cinder-block desks arranged beneath a shea tree, a place they called school.

He earned poor grades, C’s at best. When he led his class in the morning routine, he burned with shame from the holes in his pants; he had no underwear.

Somehow, his mother managed to pay his school fees. Monica Naaludong persuaded teachers to take him when his tuition was late. She sold her traditional beads and hand-woven cloths to afford his books. George held back his frustration when she insisted education was more important than a full belly.

“She knew that education was a way to change not only me, but my whole family’s destiny,” he said.

His grades were too poor for college, but Ghana’s health department offered to train traveling health workers. Two years later, he was riding a motorbike to rural villages, immunizing children against yellow fever and polio. He waded across rivers carrying vaccines on his head. He taught mothers breastfeeding methods and measured the heartbeats of their babies.

He earned less than $9 a day, a life-changing salary, and bought his mother the traditional cloths she once sold for his books.

In the coastal city of Esiama he met a Peace Corps worker from Alaska, and all his questions about America tumbled out. He saw a job opening online for a health worker in Haiti. What was a resume? he asked her.

“I was like, ‘He’ll never be able to save enough money for a plane ticket, but I’ll help with a resume,'” Leslie Lucas said.

When they walked along the beach, she told herself it was customary for friends to hold hands in Ghana. But they married in a local chapel in August 2012. One year later, the couple boarded an airplane and flew to America.

A surprise arrival

Dr. Henry Perry taught Hopkins students about Ghana’s health workers for nearly a decade before one showed up on his campus in Baltimore. It was spring 2016, and Perry heard of a transfer who had worked in the Ghana community health service.

“To have one of them end up coming here to our university is entirely unusual,” said Perry, a professor in the Bloomberg School of Public Health. “I don’t know if this has ever happened.”

He invited George Mwinnyaa to share his experience with a class. Later, he learned of the young man’s path.

George and Leslie Mwinnyaa had settled in the suburbs east of Reno, Nevada, where she worked as a school counselor. George walked the mile each day to Fernley Elementary School and his job as a janitor.

The admissions office at University of Nevada, Reno, turned him down. Nearby Truckee Meadows Community College requested his high school transcripts. George didn’t even have a birth certificate. He passed an exam to enter Western Nevada College and made the dean’s list.

American colleges had libraries and tutors, he discovered. Professors even held office hours. The young man who was raised without any advantages was now embracing every one.

“You have the Internet. You have light. How does somebody fail in America?” he said.

He watched college lectures on YouTube again and again, telling himself he must study twice as hard to compete. He transferred to Truckee Meadows and earned an associate’s degree in spring 2015, finishing with a 4.0 GPA. He was inducted in the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society. One day he burst into the office of his biology professor with news. Johns Hopkins University offered him a scholarship. Now his path led to the nation’s premier public health program.

“That was his ultimate dream,” said Laura Briggs, his biology professor at Truckee Meadows.

She threw a farewell party for George and Leslie Mwinnyaa and guests passed around a hat to collect money for the couple’s drive to Baltimore. They left the next day with their 3-week-old son, Yiri.

George Mwinnyaa entered Hopkins in fall of 2015 and began acing classes. By spring, he was enrolled in Professor Karen Masterson’s science writing class, where she presented a live video lecture by a Dutch expert. George asked if he might address the expert on the screen.

“George gave this eloquent, smart thank-you that was about a minute long,” Masterson said. “I didn’t even think to do that and I was the professor, right?”

She went to the academic adviser for public health students, asking, “Who is George?”

By then, the adviser, Lisa Folda, had befriended the young father. She gave him the old stroller and baby gate in her basement.

“We don’t take many transfers. We definitely take a very few from community college,” she said. “To know George’s origin story and how he wound up in Reno was to know he wasn’t going to take any opportunity for granted.”

He was selected last year from more than 100 applicants around the country who applied for about 15 prestigious undergraduate scholarships from the National Institutes of Health. He will work this summer at a lab in East Baltimore, testing blood samples from South Africans with HIV.

In boyhood, George Mwinnyaa walked barefoot on a dirt path to school from a house built of mud and cow dung. On Wednesday, he will walk his shortest yet longest path of all: across Hopkins’ graduation stage.    (Baltimore Sun)

http://www.twitter.com/RNNetwork1

Continue reading

Image

A Car Hijacked Every 32 Minutes In South Africa |The Republican News

Top 10 most hijacked and stolen passenger vehicles
                     Top 10 most hijacked and stolen passenger vehicles

According to statistics released by the South African Police Service in March 2017, a total of 12 743 vehicles were hijacked in South Africa between April 2016 and December 2016 – that’s 14.9% more than in the 2015/16 financial year, Wheels24 has reported.

The SAPS says that 1 416 vehicles are hijacked in South Africa each month – one every 32 minutes.

Incidents reported to our control centre alone indicated that 34 vehicles were hijacked in the greater Durban area over the past 6 months, and 69 cars were stolen in the same period. National stats for the worst hijacking spots in 2016 showed that Chatsworth ranked 5th in the country with 175 incidents reported, and Pinetown was 7th on the list with 146.

These frightening statistics beg the question, which cars and car brands are the most hijacked in South Africa?

Vehicle company Ctrack released their hijacking and crime statistics from January to December 2016, detailing which passenger vehicles and SUV’s and vehicle manufacturers, are most targeted by criminals.

Businesstech compiled their findings and according the the report, the most hijacked passenger vehicle in South Africa is the Volkswagen Polo. Toyota’s Fortuner was the most hijacked SUV, making Toyota the SUV manufacturer most targeted by criminals in the country followed by Land Rover and Nissan.

Notably, this data is an almost exact mirror of the best-selling passenger vehicle in South Africa every month. The Volkswagen Polo and Polo Vivo are currently the first and second-bestselling cars with the Toyota Fortuner currently in third.

In order, the top 10 most hijacked and stolen passenger vehicles in South Africa are: Volkswagen, Toyota, Ford, Citroen, Kia, Hyundai, BMW, Audi, Renault, Chevrolet.

In order, the top 10 most hijacked and stolen SUV’s in South Africa are: Toyota, Land Rover, Nissan, Mahindra, Volkswagen, Jeep, Porsche, Renault, Ford, Daihatsu.

Most hijacked and stolen SUV's in South Africa

Sources:
Wheels24
Businesstech
Ctrack

South Africa Today – South Africa News

http://www.twitter.comRNNetwork1

Continue reading

Image

17 New Mummies Found In Egypt Desert

Image result for 17 mummies found in egypt desert
                     The mummies found by archeologists in Egypt

Archaeologists in Egypt have discovered 17 mummies in desert catacombs in Minya province, the antiquities ministry announced Saturday.

The mummies, yet to be dated, were the largest to be found in the area south of Cairo and may be a boost for tourism in the country.

Archaeologists found the non-royal mummies in a series of corridors after following the trail of burial shafts in the Touna-Gabal district of the central Egyptian province, the ministry said in a statement.

Along with the mummies, they found a golden sheet and two papyri in Demotic — an ancient Egyptian script — as well as a number of sarcophogi made of limestone and clay.

There were also animal and bird coffins, the ministry said.

The ministry said they belonged to the Late Period, which spanned almost 300 years up to Alexander the Great’s conquest of Egypt in 332 BC.

But a spokeswoman told AFP they could also date from the Ptolemaic Dynasty, founded by Alexander the Great’s general Ptolemy.

The discovery of the non-royal mummies is considered unprecedented because it is the first such find in the area, officials said at the site.

Egyptologist Salah al-Kholi told a news conference held near the desert site that the discovery was “the first human necropolis found in central Egypt with so many mummies”.

It could herald even more discoveries in the area, he said.

The discovery was “important, unprecedented,” Mohamed Hamza, director of excavations for Cairo University said.

The site is close to an ancient animal cemetery.

“The discovery is still at its beginning,” Antiquities Minister Khaled al-Enany told reporters.

It was the second discovery of mummies announced with much fanfare by the government in less than a month.

In April, the ministry invited reporters to the southern city of Luxor to unveil eight mummies discovered in a 3,500-year-old tomb belonging to a nobleman.

For the cash-strapped Egyptian government, the discoveries are a boon from the country’s glorious past as it struggles to attract tourists scared off by a series of Islamist militant attacks.

“Antiquities are the soft power that distinguishes Egypt,” Enany said. “News of antiquities are the things that attract the world to Egypt.”

Millions of tourists visited Egypt every year to see its Giza Pyramids — the only surviving monument of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World — and its ancient pharaonic temples and relics.

But a popular uprising in 2011 that overthrew veteran strongman Hosni Mubarak ushered in years of unrest that battered the economy and drove away tourists. (Punchng.com)

Image result for 17 mummies found in egypt desert

http://www.twitter.com/RNNetwork1

Continue reading

Image

Foreign Shop Onwers In Coligny, South Africa Left In Despair After Looting

Police patrol the streets of Coligny which has been rocked by violence. Picture: ANA

     Police patrol the streets of Coligny which has been rocked by violence. Picture: ANA

One of 30 Bangladeshi nationals who own shops said collectively, Bangladeshi business owners lost stock valued at more than R700k.

At least 30 shops owned by foreign nationals have been looted in Coligny, in North West, since the outbreak of community protests, a local businessman said on Wednesday.

“I am left with nothing, they took everything in my shop, they even took the cups I used to drink water,” said Mahammed Rubel.

“It is heartbreaking to see your neighbour looting your shop. They took everything, including my clothes. People do not have mercy, you give them credit and help them, yet they loot your shop. People you know …”

Rubel is one of 30 Bangladeshi nationals who own shops in Tlhabologang. He said collectively, Bangladeshi business owners lost stock valued at more than R700 000.

“We do not know whether we will be able to recover from this great loss, we do not have means to start. We are depending on donations from food to clothes. We have nowhere to go. We are now staying at the mosque and hope our brothers in Johannesburg will help us.”

Rubel said they would monitor the situation in Coligny before deciding on their next move.

Shops were looted on April 24 when violence erupted in Coligny following the death of a 16-year-old boy, Matlhomola Jonas Mosweu.

Motlhomola died after two farmers, Pieter Doorewaard, 26, and Phillip Schutte 34, alleged they caught him stealing sunflowers at their employer’s field in Rietfontein, near the Scotland informal settlement. They ordered him to climb onto the back of a van, intending to hand him over to the police, but according to them, he jumped out of the moving van. He suffered neck injuries and later died on his way to hospital.

But an eyewitness told the police Matlhomola was thrown out of a moving van.

His death triggered a mass protest that left several houses and vehicles burnt, shops looted and damaged as the community demanded that his alleged killers be arrested.

The protest stopped after the two handed themselves over to police on April 25. But renewed violence erupted on May 8 when Doorewaard and Schutte were released on R5 000 bail each.

Furious residents torched three houses and police were forced to fire teargas and rubber bullets to disperse a crowd that wanted to torch a house in Rietvlei.

Schools have been disrupted since the outbreak of the violence, but on Wednesday, pupils at one of the high schools returned to class.

The situation was calm on Wednesday. A police helicopter monitored the situation.

African News Agency (ANA)

http://www.twitter.com/RNNetwork1

Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: