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Engaging Those Agitating For Biafra Is The Sure Means To Resolving The Issue

olusegunobasanjo1

Former President, Olusegun Obasanjo

Former President Olusegun Obasanjo says engaging in dialogue with those agitating for an independent state of Biafra is a sure way to resolving the issue.

Speaking at the Biafra conference in Abuja on Thursday, the former president said Nigerians must treat the country with care.

‎He said the country’s fundamental problem was that it had lacked national leaders.

“We never had a national leader. Our leaders at the beginning were mindful of their regions. That is our problem till today,” he said.

‎”I have maintained that the young officers who struck in 1966 were naive but there were some element of nationalism in some of them. Be that as it may, it set us back.”

He said the war showed the bad side of the country.

“The language used in the war did not help matters, the people on the Biafra side called us vandals and we called them rebels,” he said.

“We thought we would end the war in three months, but it took us 30 months, and the federal side nearly lost it.

‎”Civil war is more difficult than fighting in a foreign land because we are fighting to unite.

‎”‎Even a soldier of mine who tried to rape a woman… I had to chase him with a gun. He did not succeed in raping the woman, and I did not have to gun him down.”

Obasanjo said some of those agitating for Biafra today lacked an understanding of what it entails.

“Some of the people agitating for Biafra today were not even born then. They don’t know what it entails,” he said.

‎”But I think, we should even appeal to those saying they want to go, we should not tell them to go, we should make them understand that there is enough cake to share. We should massage Nigeria just like in a love relationship.”             (The Cable)

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Look At Genevieve Nnaji’s Multi-billion Naira Mansion In Ghana (VIDEO)

By Chibiko Ikenna Offor

She is a top Nollywood actress, one of the pioneers of the fast growing Nollywood film and entertainment industry.

Genevieve Nnaji is a household name in the movie industry that no one in Nigeria or Africa could think twice before remembering her name or one of her movies.

She was even once slated to stare alongside a world-renowned Pinewood Film legendary movie franchise know as James Bond, or 007, a licensed British royal secret agent and killer. She is definitely a success story in Nigeria as well as Africa.

She has had a stint in Hollywood but has gone recently silent in Nollywood movie industry films, but her name can still re-echo anytime it is mentioned.

Her wealth is also not very common and could be seen here in this video from DTS that she has accumulated some good assets for herself.

She should enjoy her life, she has worked hard for it.

Genevieve_Nnaji_in_Weekend_Getaway

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Igbo Will Fight Anyone Who Wants To Divide Nigeria, Says Iwuanyanwu

 

Chief-Emmanuel-Iwuanyanwu

Chief Emmanuel Iwuanyanwu

Omotayo Yusuf

– Emmanuel Iwuanyanwu called on the government to stop the marginaliation against Igbos

– He said they have invested a lot in the country than Yorubas and Hausas

– The businessman said the region would fight anyone who wants to divide the country

Prominent Igbo politician, Emmanuel Iwuanyanwu, has declared that the Igbos were not interested in leaving Nigeria and would fight anyone who wants to do so.

The Punch reports that Iwuanyanwu spoke at the National Unity summit organised by Arewa Ambassadors Congress of Nigeria in partnership with Youth Assembly of Nigeria.

The businessman said Igbos were major stakeholders in Nigeria and would therefore fight anyone who wants to divide the country including the Arewa and Oduduwa people.

He also spoke about the detention of Nnamdi Kanu describing it as unnecessary as he had not done anything wrong.

“He (Kanu) only expressed his view. No arm was found in his possession. We are Biafrans and we are not ashamed to say it. Igbo have invested more in Nigeria than Arewa and Oduduwa. We want to be one Nigeria in fairness.”

He said Igbo youths were only rebelling against the injustice happening against them in the country and not about leaving the country.

“Biafra is not about secession. It is a name of a particular people in Nigeria from the South East. Therefore, it is not an offense to say that I am a Biafran. There was no victor, no vanquished after the civil war.

I am impressed with Yakubu Gowon because he implemented all the agreements reached at the end of the Civil War. Igbo were not deprived at the end of the civil war.”

He called on Nigerian youths to “work for the growth of the country and shun tribal and religious sentiments” as “the country had the capacity to become one of the best countries in the world in the years to come.”

Iwuanyanwu accused the federal government of marginalising the Igbos because they voted for the Peoples Democratic Party during the last election.  (Naij.com)

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From West Africa To Baltimore: A Ghanaian Long Path To Education For A Hopkins Star

 

Tim Prudente
George Mwinnyaa                               © Amy Davis/Baltimore Sun/TNS George Mwinnyaa

 

The remote bushlands of West Africa are far from Johns Hopkins University, and the path was neither sure nor straight for the boy whose name meant “beloved by his ancestors.” They called him Kpimenongme Mwinnyaa.

Only now, as he prepares to graduate – having been baptized George, having earned semester after semester of straight A’s despite grades once too poor for college – does he dare believe it’s more than a dream.

George Mwinnyaa, 29, will receive a bachelor’s degree in public health with academic honors during Hopkins’ commencement Wednesday.

Mwinnyaa, who is from Ghana, says he slips on a woven African smock each morning to remember where his path began.

“If you don’t know where you come from, you will not know where you are going,” he says.

He comes from a remote village in Nandom-Guo, where a cobra bite kills fast and cholera even faster. Polygamy was the custom and his father had seven wives and 32 children. George was the youngest of them all. He was about five years old when his father died and his widowed mother was left to raise seven children. A slight woman, she held off starvation with her wits, boiling hot peppers into soup. A few spoonfuls would cause George to gulp water to ease his hunger.

Each morning he woke before sunrise to fetch water from the river and hoe the dry plot that never grew enough beans. Then he walked a path through the bush to cinder-block desks arranged beneath a shea tree, a place they called school.

He earned poor grades, C’s at best. When he led his class in the morning routine, he burned with shame from the holes in his pants; he had no underwear.

Somehow, his mother managed to pay his school fees. Monica Naaludong persuaded teachers to take him when his tuition was late. She sold her traditional beads and hand-woven cloths to afford his books. George held back his frustration when she insisted education was more important than a full belly.

“She knew that education was a way to change not only me, but my whole family’s destiny,” he said.

His grades were too poor for college, but Ghana’s health department offered to train traveling health workers. Two years later, he was riding a motorbike to rural villages, immunizing children against yellow fever and polio. He waded across rivers carrying vaccines on his head. He taught mothers breastfeeding methods and measured the heartbeats of their babies.

He earned less than $9 a day, a life-changing salary, and bought his mother the traditional cloths she once sold for his books.

In the coastal city of Esiama he met a Peace Corps worker from Alaska, and all his questions about America tumbled out. He saw a job opening online for a health worker in Haiti. What was a resume? he asked her.

“I was like, ‘He’ll never be able to save enough money for a plane ticket, but I’ll help with a resume,'” Leslie Lucas said.

When they walked along the beach, she told herself it was customary for friends to hold hands in Ghana. But they married in a local chapel in August 2012. One year later, the couple boarded an airplane and flew to America.

A surprise arrival

Dr. Henry Perry taught Hopkins students about Ghana’s health workers for nearly a decade before one showed up on his campus in Baltimore. It was spring 2016, and Perry heard of a transfer who had worked in the Ghana community health service.

“To have one of them end up coming here to our university is entirely unusual,” said Perry, a professor in the Bloomberg School of Public Health. “I don’t know if this has ever happened.”

He invited George Mwinnyaa to share his experience with a class. Later, he learned of the young man’s path.

George and Leslie Mwinnyaa had settled in the suburbs east of Reno, Nevada, where she worked as a school counselor. George walked the mile each day to Fernley Elementary School and his job as a janitor.

The admissions office at University of Nevada, Reno, turned him down. Nearby Truckee Meadows Community College requested his high school transcripts. George didn’t even have a birth certificate. He passed an exam to enter Western Nevada College and made the dean’s list.

American colleges had libraries and tutors, he discovered. Professors even held office hours. The young man who was raised without any advantages was now embracing every one.

“You have the Internet. You have light. How does somebody fail in America?” he said.

He watched college lectures on YouTube again and again, telling himself he must study twice as hard to compete. He transferred to Truckee Meadows and earned an associate’s degree in spring 2015, finishing with a 4.0 GPA. He was inducted in the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society. One day he burst into the office of his biology professor with news. Johns Hopkins University offered him a scholarship. Now his path led to the nation’s premier public health program.

“That was his ultimate dream,” said Laura Briggs, his biology professor at Truckee Meadows.

She threw a farewell party for George and Leslie Mwinnyaa and guests passed around a hat to collect money for the couple’s drive to Baltimore. They left the next day with their 3-week-old son, Yiri.

George Mwinnyaa entered Hopkins in fall of 2015 and began acing classes. By spring, he was enrolled in Professor Karen Masterson’s science writing class, where she presented a live video lecture by a Dutch expert. George asked if he might address the expert on the screen.

“George gave this eloquent, smart thank-you that was about a minute long,” Masterson said. “I didn’t even think to do that and I was the professor, right?”

She went to the academic adviser for public health students, asking, “Who is George?”

By then, the adviser, Lisa Folda, had befriended the young father. She gave him the old stroller and baby gate in her basement.

“We don’t take many transfers. We definitely take a very few from community college,” she said. “To know George’s origin story and how he wound up in Reno was to know he wasn’t going to take any opportunity for granted.”

He was selected last year from more than 100 applicants around the country who applied for about 15 prestigious undergraduate scholarships from the National Institutes of Health. He will work this summer at a lab in East Baltimore, testing blood samples from South Africans with HIV.

In boyhood, George Mwinnyaa walked barefoot on a dirt path to school from a house built of mud and cow dung. On Wednesday, he will walk his shortest yet longest path of all: across Hopkins’ graduation stage.    (Baltimore Sun)

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Teen Fulfills Wish To Receive High School Diploma Days Before Cancer Death

 

                                            © GoFundMe/jerome-singleton

The grieving family of a Louisiana teen who died on Sunday is grateful that he was given the chance to fulfill his final wish to receive his high school diploma. Jerome Singleton, 17, had been diagnosed with Rhabdomyosarcoma and after 47 rounds of chemotherapy, doctors said there was nothing more they could do.

With Scottlandville High School’s graduation planned for later this month, concerned family members worried that Singleton wouldn’t be able to achieve his dying wish, KTVU reported. But the school had other plans for the teen, and held a special ceremony for him at his home where he was receiving hospice care.

Relatives, friends, nurses and Singleton’s high school principal were on hand for the ceremony, and though he was too weak to stand he proudly donned a cap and gown. Attendees sang his favorite song, “Oh Happy Day,” and Singleton officially became a high school graduate.

He died on Sunday at home while holding his younger sister’s hand.

A GoFundMe page to help the family cover the costs of a funeral has asked for prayers for Singleton.

(FOX NEWS)

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Former Trump Campaign Adviser, Page To Testify In Russia Probe On June 6 – ABC News

 

FILE PHOTO: One-time advisor of U.S. president-elect Donald Trump Carter Page addresses the audience during a presentation in Moscow, Russia, December 12, 2016.© REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin/File Photo FILE PHOTO: One-time advisor of U.S. president-elect Donald Trump Carter Page addresses the audience during a presentation in Moscow, Russia, December 12, 2016.  

Carter Page, a former foreign policy adviser to Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, will testify on June 6 before a House committee investigating alleged efforts by Russia to influence the U.S. election, ABC News reported on Wednesday.

ABC News, which said Page had told it about the scheduled testimony, also cited a letter the former Trump adviser wrote to the leaders of the House Intelligence Committee’s investigation in which he said witnesses the panel had already heard from had presented “one biased viewpoint.”   (REUTERS)

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BREAKING: Estimated 23m Americans Would Lose Health Insurance Under Republican Bill: CBO

Yasmeen Abutaleb

FILE: President Donald Trump, flanked by House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Rep. Kevin Brady, R-Texas, and House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., are seen in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Thursday, May 4, 2017, after the House pushed through a health care bill.© AP Photo/Evan Vucci FILE: President Donald Trump, flanked by House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Rep. Kevin Brady, R-Texas, and House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., are seen in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington…WASHINGTON – An estimated 23 million people would lose health coverage by 2026 under Republican legislation aimed at repealing Obamacare, a nonpartisan congressional agency said on Wednesday in the first calculation of the new bill’s potential impact.

The report from the Congressional Budget Office also said federal deficits would fall by $119 billion between 2017 and 2026 under the bill, which was approved this month by the Republican-dominated House of Representatives. The CBO score raises the stakes for Republican senators now working on their own version of the legislation.

House Republicans came under sharp criticism for passing the bill before the CBO could make its assessment. The Trump administration already has relied on the House bill’s healthcare spending cuts in its proposed federal budget.

The bill is called the American Health Care Act and would fulfill a long-running Republican goal – repealing and replacing much of former President Barack Obama’s 2010 Affordable Care Act, commonly called Obamacare. President Donald Trump, who made replacing it a key campaign promise in 2016, and other Republicans say Obamacare is too costly and creates unwarranted government interference in healthcare decisions.

Congress is aiming to pass the bill under a process called reconciliation, which requires only a simple majority of votes in the Senate, where Republicans hold a 52-48 majority, instead of 60 votes. Under those rules, all elements of the bill must have a direct budgetary impact or else they must be stricken from the legislation.

A group of 13 Republican senators led by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell are expected to draft their own version of the healthcare bill in the coming months. McConnell, however, told Reuters on Wednesday he does not yet know how Republicans will have the necessary votes.

The CBO said federal deficits would fall by $119 billion between 2017 and 2026 under the Republican bill.

The bill would eliminate most Obamacare taxes that help subsidize private health coverage for individuals, roll back the government’s Medicaid health plan for the poor and disabled and replace the law’s income-based tax credits for buying medical coverage with credits based on age.

The new CBO score predicts the AHCA would cover 1 million more Americans than a previous version of the bill, which the agency estimated would have left 24 million more people uninsured than Obamacare in 2026.

In the weeks leading up to the House vote on May 4, two controversial amendments were added to the bill that ultimately helped secure its passage, including one that was added the day before the vote.

One amendment would allow states to opt out of a popular Obamacare provision that prevents insurers from charging people with pre-existing conditions higher rates, as well as one that required insurers to cover 10 essential health benefits such as maternity care and prescription drugs.

Another amendment allocates an additional $8 billion over five years to help people with pre-existing conditions cover medical costs.

Trump promised to repeal Obamacare immediately upon taking office in January but replacing the program that provided health insurance to 20 million people poses political risks.

Hospitals could lose significant revenue because far fewer people will have insurance and insurers are worried about the affordability of the tax structure and proposed major changes in Medicaid financing.

The Republicans’ first attempt at undoing Obamacare resulted in a setback for the Trump agenda in March. Conservative and moderate Republican factions in the House were opposed to the initial legislation and the leadership decided not to put it up for a vote.

They found a consensus through the opt-out amendments on pre-existing conditions, which adds $8 billion for sufferers, and the essential health benefits and passed it on May 4.

(REUTERS)

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