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Dismay At Prague National Museum As Curators Find ‘Priceless’ Diamonds Are Cut Glasses, Rubies Are Synthetic

Sarah D Malm

<span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:10px;">Liars: A diamond in the Prague National Museum's collection was found to be a worthless piece of cut glass during an inspection by curators</span><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:10px;"><br /><br />Read more:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5477647/Horror-Prague-National-Museum-finds-diamonds-fake.html#ixzz59DpoSzAj" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;min-height:1px;cursor:pointer;color:#003399;">http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5477647/Horror-Prague-National-Museum-finds-diamonds-fake.html#ixzz59DpoSzAj</a>&nbsp;<br />Follow us:&nbsp;<a href="http://ec.tynt.com/b/rw?id=bBOTTqvd0r3Pooab7jrHcU&u=MailOnline" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;min-height:1px;cursor:pointer;color:#003580;" target="_blank">@MailOnline on Twitter</a>&nbsp;|&nbsp;<a href="http://ec.tynt.com/b/rf?id=bBOTTqvd0r3Pooab7jrHcU&u=DailyMail" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;min-height:1px;cursor:pointer;color:#003580;" target="_blank">DailyMail on Facebook</a></span>© Daily Mail Liars: A diamond in the Prague National Museum’s collection was found to be a worthless piece of cut glass during an inspection by curators

Diamonds and sapphires kept at the Czech National Museum in Prague and thought to be worth millions have been found to be fake.

A 5-carat diamond acquired by the museum in 1968 has been revealed to be a worthless piece of cut glass during an audit by concerned curators.

Meanwhile, a 19-carat sapphire bought by the museum for 200,000 crowns (£7,000) in 1978 has been found to be a cheap imitation worth only a fraction of that sum.

Half of the museum’s collection of rubies are also thought to be fakes.

Liars: A diamond in the Prague National Museum’s collection was found to be a worthless piece of cut glass during an inspection by curators

 

a close up of a device: A sapphire bought by the museum for 200,000 crowns (£7,000) back in 1978 has been found to be synthetic, and worth only a fraction of that sum© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited A sapphire bought by the museum for 200,000 crowns (£7,000) back in 1978 has been found to be synthetic, and worth only a fraction of that sum  

A sapphire bought by the museum for 200,000 crowns  (£7,000) back in 1978 has been found to be synthetic, and worth only a fraction of that sum

It is not known how the fakes have come into the museum’s possession, and while it is possible that they were not properly checked at the time of acquisition, they may also have been swapped by criminals and the real gems stolen.

The discovery was made during an inspection of some of the museum’s 5,000 precious stones and minerals, kept under lock and key in the Czech Republic’s capital.

‘What we have here is still a sapphire, but it is not a natural stone as was documented when the museum gained it for its collection in the 1970s,’ Ivo Macek, head of the museum’s precious stones department, told Radio Praha.cz

‘It was artificially created so it does not have the value we thought it did. It was acquired for 200 thousand crowns and today it would have been worth tens of millions.

‘And what we thought to be a 5-carat diamond was in fact plain glass given a diamond cutting.’

a close up of a computer: The embarrassing discoveries were made during an inspection of some of the museum's 5,000 precious stones and minerals© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited The embarrassing discoveries were made during an inspection of some of the museum’s 5,000 precious stones and minerals  

The embarrassing discoveries were made during an inspection of some of the museum’s 5,000 precious stones and minerals

The museum says they do not know how the fakes ended up in their collection, and is carrying out an investigation.

It is not known if the stones were already fake when they were acquired by the Museum in the 60s and 70s.

It is also not known if staff at the time did not have the expertise to catch the fakery, or if real gems were in fact acquired, and these have since been replaced by thieves.

a large building: Scratching the surface: The discovery was made during an inspection of the Prague National Museum's 5,000 precious stones and minerals© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Scratching the surface: The discovery was made during an inspection of the Prague National Museum’s 5,000 precious stones and minerals  

The person in charge at the time has since passed away, and Radio Praha reports that the collection has been kept ‘under lock and key’ from the start.

So far, the museum has been able to check 400 of their 5,000 stones, with the full review of the collection expected to be completed by 2020.

The museum’s deputy director Michal Stehlík attempted to play down the issue when speaking to the radio station.

He said: ‘When you have a collection of 20 million artefacts then a certain fraction of that may prove to be problematic. These things happen.

‘So we will push ahead with the audit and I think we may even organize an exhibition of fakes in this and other world museums when it is concluded in 2020.’

BIRTH OF THE REPUBLIC: CZECH HISTORY

The Czech Republic can trace its roots back to the 9th century when it was founded as the Duchy of Bohemia under the Great Moravian Empire.

Following the collapse of that empire, it became part of the Holy Roman Empire and was then absorbed by the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

Czechoslovakia came into existence as an independent country in 1918 following the end of the First World War and the collapse of world empires.

During the Second World War, the Czech part of the country was occupied by the Nazis, with the Slovak party becoming the Slovak Republic.

In 1945 the entire country was liberated by the US and Russia before electing a communist government the following year.

A 1948 coup d’état established the country as a one-party state under Soviet influence and was occupied by the Soviets from 1968 after a failed uprising.

The country would remain under occupation until 1989 when the Velvet Revolution ended the one-party system and reinstated the market economy.

On 1 January 1993 Czechoslovakia peacefully dissolved, becoming the independent states of the Czech Republic and Slovakia.  (Daily Mail)

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